AI and Automation’s Impact on the Workforce

For years now, human resources professionals have heard about artificial intelligence and automation with increasing frequency, and with good reason. The two closely-related technologies are being used for more and more tasks within organizations. Most are used to replace humans engaged in repetitive processes; things that are completed the same way over and over again. The implementation of one or both technologies can have positive impacts on the bottom lines of companies.

While that’s a positive point for employing the technology what is the impact to workers? Are they displaced, replaced, or repurposed within the organization?. During a presentation as part of the HR Exchange Network’s HR and Future of Work online event, Southern New Hampshire University’s vice president of research and insight, Dr. Jerome Rekart, took a look at Southern New Hampshire University research that not only explains the opinion landscape around the technologies, but looks at whether or not companies are prepared to handle the human impact of the continued proliferation of artificial intelligence and automation.

AI and Automation
Defining the Technologies
From a consumer perspective, artificial intelligence is already rampant in daily life. Apple users are using ‘Siri’ to answer simple questions and even conduct some tasks; dictating a text message or playing music. Amazon’s family of Echo devices are much the same. When put in the context of human resources, AI is a bit more focused in that the technology “replaces some type of cognitive path or makes [a job] easier.”

Automation is not much different. Through AI, automation occurs when a machine does “some kind of physical task” over and over again.

Employee and Employer Opinions
As mentioned earlier, there are mixed opinions on whether the adoption of these technologies is a good thing or a bad thing for the workforce. Dr. Rekart pointed to two separate pieces of research that draw a stark contrast between two significant groups: employees and employers.

Last year, Gallup, in a partnership with Northeastern, surveyed employees about their opinions regarding artificial intelligence and found that 70 percent believed AI would, in the long run, kill more jobs than it will create. Conversely, McKinsey’s research a year earlier focused on corporate leaders. They were asked whether or not AI would force a reduction in the workforce. Only six percent said it would; meaning 94 percent said they didn’t believe that it would necessitate a reduction at all.

Impact in Five Years
Given that most experts believe that AI and automation will have drastic effects on most – if not all – organizations, Dr. Rekart asked the question: how do HR leaders perceive AI and automation will impact their organizations over the next five years?

Consistent with expert opinion, Rekart’s research found that 68 percent of respondents said there will be some type of impact. Looking closer at the breakdown of that grouping, 32 percent of respondents expect to be affected by both AI and automation, while 20 percent expect to be only affected by AI and 16 percent only automation. That said, how do organizations feel about the impact of technology? Will it be of great benefit to the organization and its employees or will it be a detriment. Dr. Rekart’s research points to a beneficial impact.

The first question posed to respondents focused specifically on the company’s bottom line. Rekart says the results were overwhelmingly positive.

“Almost 80 percent said that it would be either somewhat or very positive.”

But the next question was even more intriguing.

“When we asked the next question,” Rekart continued, “we saw a slight reduction there… but almost the exact same numbers.”

But when asked whether they felt there would be a displacement of employees within their organization, many respondents indicated that they did anticipate such an effect. In fact, the average across all HR leaders shows that it is believed that almost one-third of labor will be displaced by AI or automation within the coming five years.

So where will most of the displacement come? According to Dr. Rekart’s research, most will come from

All of that said, it begs the question: how are HR leaders preparing for the impact of artificial intelligence and automation. According to Dr. Rekart – most aren’t.

When asked “have you or your organization begun to plan for employee displacement by AI or automation,” a little more than 58 percent said no.

Where to Begin
So how do companies begin to prepare their workforce? There are several different ways. Four Dr. Rekart suggested were:

Directing employees to seek employment outside the organization
Providing career counseling
Relocating displaced employees within the organization
Providing upskilling opportunities
In his research, Dr. Rekart put that question to HR professionals. Nearly 60 percent said they would provide some type of upskilling opportunity. Going deeper, Dr. Rekart wanted to know how, specifically, those organizations planned to deliver that upskilling.

Nearly 80 percent said they would provide professional development and/or training. Others pointed to providing tuition assistance/reimbursement for college coursework while others said they would provide opportunities to earn badges/non-degree credentials.

The Path Forward
Given that information, Dr. Rekart wanted to know what advice HR professionals would give employees whose job is likely in danger of being displaced by AI or automation? Nearly 35 percent pointed to getting new skills or training. In comments related to that finding, HR professionals pointed to the need for employees to “begin reading about AI” and trying to “outsmart the technology” by finding a job it will never be able to do. But for Dr. Rekart, all comments were summed up in the following statement:

So how do we move in that direction? Dr. Rekart said, “We all have to recognize AI and automation are going to affect off our jobs.” He also said things such as professional development, upskilling, and education/tuition assistance/reimbursement will have positive benefits including productivity, loyalty and return-on-investment. Finally, Dr. Rekart said, “Many organizations are trying to be responsive to the workforce, to its needs and to the changes that the organizations are feeling.”

Private Sector Tracker: How Asia’s Companies Are Responding To The COVID-19 Pandemic

With the global pandemic reaching more than 175 countries and territories, companies across the Asia-Pacific are responding to the crisis on several fronts. Some are donating funds for medical supplies, while those in biotech are ramping up production for testing kits or working to create a much-needed vaccine. Below, we’ve compiled a list of notable companies and the ways in which they are responding to the evolving pandemic.

This is a developing story—Forbes Asia will continue to track and update the contributions of Asia’s companies. This roster is sorted by two categories, first by the latest developments (and updates to previous efforts), followed by the overall list of contributions from Asia’s companies.

May 1 to May 14

Asia Coatings Enterprises: Its paint subsidiary Mowilex Indonesia has donated 26,000 face masks and 14,000 other personal protective equipment to frontline workers through the Indonesian Hospital Association (PERSI). In April Mowilex’s CEO, Niko Safavi, announced the company will continue to pay employees their full salaries despite a reduction in work schedules.

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MetroResidences: The Singapore-based hospitality startup launched the Safe Home Programme, which will provide free accommodation for frontline workers who wish to isolate themselves for up to 14 days. Workers looking to extend their stay will receive a 50% discount from standard monthly rates. In its Japan locations, discounts of 20% will be given to select apartments.

Suncity Group: Its Philippines’ subsidiary, SunTrust, together with the Resorts World Philippines Cultural Heritage Foundation and the Philippine Amusement Gaming Corporation, has donated 50 million Philippine pesos ($2 million) worth of personal protective equipment to 40 public hospitals in Luzon. Suncity is one of Macau’s largest junket operators.

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Yili Group: The Chinese dairy company Yili Group, together with its Thai subsidiary, donated 170,400 face masks and other protective products to several organizations in Thailand including the Thai Red Cross and the Pathum Thani Hospital. This follows similar donations by the company to Iraq, Uruguay, the Netherlands and Indonesia.

Asia’s Private Sector

Ansell: In April the Australian protective equipment maker announced expanding production capacity to meet higher demand for its biohazard suits and gloves.

Ascletis: In March the Hangzhou-based pharmaceutical company announced results of clinical trials of its antiviral drug danoprevir on Covid-19 patients in China; the small-scale study found that “danoprevir combined with ritonavir is safe and well tolerated in all patients.”

Biolidics: Singapore-based medtech firm created and started marketing of a Covid-19 test kit in March. The test kit is now approved for sale in the EU and the Philippines, and received provisional authorization from Singapore’s Health Sciences Authority. It is looking to gain approval for sale in the U.S. and elsewhere in Asia.

CanSino Biologics: Tianjin, China-based pharma company started clinical trials for its Covid-19 vaccine in March, using the vaccine technology deployed to develop the Ebola vaccine. On April 10, the firm entered phase II of testing.

DBS
DBS GETTY
DBS Bank: In April, the Singapore multinational bank, through its DBS Stronger Together Fund, announced it will donate S$10.5 million ($7.3 million) to help communities in Asia affected by the virus. The funds will be used to provide meals and care packets across Asia; as well as test kits, ventilators and protective gear for India and Indonesia, where medical supplies are lacking. The bank is also working with The Food Bank Singapore to provide meals for low-income individuals and the elderly.

Envision Group: In March, one of the world’s largest wind turbine makers set up a manufacturing center in China that can produce a daily output of 100,000 masks. In a televised interview, founder and CEO Lei Zhang said Envision’s automation technology can meet the growing demand for masks quickly. The Shanghai-based company says it will donate the masks to businesses, schools and communities in China and to other countries affected by the virus such as Japan and South Korea.

FPT Group: In February, technology firm FPT partnered with Vietnam’s Ministry of Health and launched a 24/7 chatbot that could handle 5,000 Covid-19 related inquires per day. The following month Hanoi-based FPT donated its 2,000-room university dorm for quarantine purposes and contributed $850,000 in medical equipment, such as ventilators and disinfectant supplies to the local government.

Fujifilm: At the end of March, the Tokyo-based company’s pharmaceutical arm, Fujifilm Toyama Chemical, started phase III clinical trials of its flu drug Favipiravir on Covid-19 patients in Japan and is accelerating production.

GeneOne Life Science: Announced in March, South Korean vaccine maker is collaborating with researchers at Houston Methodist Hospital to develop an RNA vaccine for Covid-19.

Green Cross: South Korean biopharma company’s subsidiary GC Lab Cell has been developing cell therapy-based treatments for Covid-19 since March, with plans to begin human trials in the second half of the year.

HDFC Bank: The Indian bank announced in May that it has donated $20 million to the national PM-Cares fund and released a music video titled “ We Won’t Accept Defeat” by Oscar and Grammy-Award winning composer AR Rahman. The bank says it will donate $7 to the fund each time the video is shared on social media.

Healthmatch: The Australian startup, which facilities clinical trials for medical firms, has set up a global Covid-19 clinical trial tracker in March and is also providing firms with free access to its platform to recruit trial patients for research in Australia. Healthmatch is headed by Forbes Asia’s Under 30 honoree Manuri Gunawardena.

I-Mab Biopharma: Shanghai-based biopharma outfit announced in March it would begin clinical trials of its TJM2 antibody treatment on Covid-19 patients in the U.S., with plans to expand to other countries affected by the pandemic.

JN Medsys: Following a provisional approval in April, the Singapore-based company is ramping up production of its “ProTect” test kit, which detects three target genes, as recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; according the firm, results can be obtained in two hours and has an accuracy rate of more than 95%.

Mesoblast: Since March the Australian medical firm has been working with authorities in Australia, China, Europe and the U.S. to evaluate the use of its Remestemcel-L drug to treat Covid-19.

Pan Brothers: In April the garment manufacturer responded to Indonesia’s call for help by converting their manufacturing lines to create hazmat suits and face masks for front line workers. The company —whose clients include Prada and Adidas— has reportedly produced 10 million masks and 100,000 jumpsuits, with plans to raise production to 100 million masks, 10 million disposable jump suits and one million washable jumpsuits.

Ping An: The Chinese insurance firm announced on April 3 that it is donating £1.1 million ($1.2 million) worth of medical supplies to the U.K. government such as test kits, protective clothing and ventilators.

Seegene: Since February the South Korean biotech firm has ramped up production of its innovative Covid-19 test kits, which helped with the country’s rapid testing measures. The firm has sent test kits to countries in Europe and Asia; and is awaiting approval from the U.S. FDA.

Shiseido: In April the cosmetics giant announced it will be shifting some of its production lines in Japan to make hand sanitizers for the country’s medical facilities; two of its factories will reach a capacity of 200,000 bottles per month. Its subsidiaries in France and the U.S. will also produce disinfectant solutions, which will be supplied to medical centers in the respective countries. The company says it will share its sanitizing formula with other companies.

Takeda: Japanese medical firm started working on hyperimmune therapy in March, using blood plasma from previously infected patients.

Yuchengco Group: In March the group’s chairperson Helen Yuchengco Dee stated that employees of the conglomerate will continue to have their jobs and will receive their full monthly salaries during Philippines’ quarantine period. In a Facebook post, Mapúa University, which is partly owned by Yuchengoco, said the company has also taken part in Project Ugnayan, an initiative that provides grocery vouchers for needy families in Manila.

Zhejiang Hisun Pharmaceuticals: Chinese pharmaceutical company announced positive results from trials of its flu drug Favipiravir on Covid-19 patients in Shenzhen and Wuhan in March; the company is supplying the drug to authorities in China and several other countries.

With additional reporting by Pamela Ambler, Justin Doebele, Naazneen Karmali, Atika Lim and Giacomo Tognini.

Source : https://www.forbes.com/sites/gracechung/2020/05/14/private-sector-tracker-how-asias-companies-are-responding-to-the-covid-19-pandemic/#784576e46741

Short-time working model should be adopted for furlough scheme

Think tank Reform has called on the government to change the coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (JRS) to include a short-time working model.

Currently, employers must choose between furloughing staff to access state support and thus reducing their own ability to function, or to carry on as usual and miss out on state support during a difficult economic period.

Reform advised replacing the current furloughing system with a short-time working scheme where the government can top up the salaries of employees working shorter hours.

The think tank suggested the move would give employers greater flexibility and help avoid mass redundancies when the JRS ends in June.

This echoed a CIPD report published earlier this week which warned the JRS could be a ‘waiting room for unemployment’.

Reform advised the government to introduce a ‘clawback’ mechanism under this new scheme to ensure money gets to those who really need it where companies who reported profits over a certain set threshold during this period would need to pay back some or all of their funding.

It also suggested that the government needs to do more to combat fraud within the system by launching a marketing campaign to publicise the penalties and setting up the promised coronavirus hotline and online portal to report abuse.

Yet Rachel Collins, employment law expert at Stevens & Bolton, said the proposals could help prevent future redundancies.

“A key lesson has been learnt from the financial crisis of 2008: economic recovery will be faster if businesses retain a skilled workforce. As such, maintaining the majority of the workforce on ‘short-time working’ could be key to the UK securing economic stability in the long-run.

“Many new challenges will arise as lockdown restrictions are gradually lifted and existing cash flow problems will not go away overnight. Reform’s proposals to amend the JRS to allow for short-term working would therefore provide much needed support and may help to avoid mass redundancies and unemployment.”

Yet Collins acknowledged the proposal could be open to abuse and difficult to police.

“Businesses could see it as an opportunity to operate normally whilst using government grants to support their wage bill.

“In practice, employers will be required to manage daily/weekly fluctuations in demand and capacity, and, if employees’ hours are fixed under such a scheme, they may not have sufficient flexibility to quickly react to changing demands.

“Employers may therefore wish to look at implementing schemes tailored to their own requirements to achieve the required flexibility.”

Collins advised employers should always use a “fair selection process” to reduce the risks of discrimination claims being brought by employees.

Source : https://www.hrmagazine.co.uk/article-details/short-time-working-model-should-be-adopted-for-furlough-scheme

The Future of Work after COVID: Turning Crisis into Positive Change

As the dust begins to settle and employers gain confidence in current routines, now is the time for business leaders to begin developing comprehensive people strategies that will work for the future of work after COVID.
55% of employers expect that their work-from-home policies will remain in effect after the pandemic ends, and 49% expect to continue offering flexible work arrangements.
While remote and flexible opportunities are often viewed as an employee-facing benefit, employers can benefit from significant cost reductions and improved retention, productivity, and engagement.
In approximately 60-some days, nearly every organization has completely reimagined how they are managing workforce operations and their bottom lines. As the dust begins to settle and both employers and employees gain confidence in current routines, it’s time for business leaders to look forward. The long-term impact of the pandemic on government policies and financial projections remains uncertain, but now is the time to begin developing comprehensive people strategies that will work for the future of work after COVID.

(If you’ve been struggling with how to plan for what’s next for your workplace and the future of work after COVID, don’t miss tomorrow’s achieve Engagement webcast with industry expert Jason Lauritsen and futurist Rebecca Ryan as they discuss how to use the tools of strategic foresight and scenario planning to prepare for the next year and beyond.)

Despite the many inherent challenges our world is facing due to the pandemic, it has also pressure-tested and accelerated potentially positive changes in many areas of our society. Every period of rapid transformation brings progress. As we wait to see the long-term impact of the pandemic on our country, economy, and organizations, I anticipate both business leaders and their people will take this opportunity to re-evaluate conventional ways of working and how the lessons we’re learning today can help us reimagine tomorrow.

The role of flexibility in the future of work after COVID
Many organizations—those who were even able to transition the majority of their people to remote work—faced initial challenges in doing so. But thanks to enhanced technology, collaboration, and communication, the majority have found success and settled into a routine. As a result, according to a recent study by Willis Towers Watson, 55% of employers expect that their work-from-home policies will remain in effect after the pandemic ends, and 49% expect to continue offering flexible work arrangements. Some organizations—such as Twitter—have even announced that they will allow eligible employees to work from home permanently.

Operationally, the fundamental need for this is likely to remain for some time: Many schools and daycare centers will remain closed until the fall, making it simply impossible for many employees to to return to the office. Even employees without dependents may be afraid to return to work (or actively participate in their communities, for that matter) until it’s been demonstrated safe to do so.

What’s more, employees have been clamoring for more flexible arrangements for years. Before the pandemic, several surveys suggested that 80% of employees (or more) wanted the ability to work from home at least some of the time. More than a third would be willing to take a pay cut in exchange for the option. And many organizations were already supporting flexible schedules; back in 2016, Gallup revealed that 43% of the workforce was already working from home at least part-time.

I think it’s likely that, once employers are able to fully reopen their doors, many employees who wanted to work from home (but were previously unable to) will desire the option even more after experiencing it firsthand.

Last year, our State of Remote Work research revealed that, on average, virtual employees are not just surviving—they’re thriving. In fact, remote workers reported feeling more productive than their in-office peers and were actually 40% more likely to have been promoted in the past year.

Cost-savings, retention, and engagement: Benefits for employers
While remote and flexible opportunities are often viewed as an employee-facing benefit, there’s incredible value here for employers, too. Recently, remote work has been touted as a powerful recruitment and engagement tool, but many employers encouraged remote work back in 2008 as a way to cut costs during the Great Recession. (On average, employers can save about $11,000/year for each person who works remotely half of the time.)

Hopefully, this experience has also reduced fears for employers and managers about their teams’ ability to perform well remotely. The outdated concept that in-seat-equals-productivity has been disproven many times over, but concerns about managing a remote workforce were still very prevalent for many employers. As organizations have seen the efficacy of working from home—during a pandemic, with significantly heightened levels of stress, lack of childcare, and other unusual considerations likely to negatively impact productivity—they will likely find more creative and effective ways to measure output, productivity, and results.

Looking to a more flexible future
Now is the time for companies to step back and reevaluate how they can best meet the needs of their customers and their people. There has been a decades-long push for reevaluating longstanding norms about how work gets done, and we may find that traditional conventions, such as rewarding a longer workday over a more productive one, doesn’t fit in the future of work.

I am extremely grateful to work for a company who is (and has always been) a Best Place to Work, supporting flexibility, work-life balance, and so, so much more. I hope that as we begin to emerge from the immediate crisis of this pandemic, more organizations will apply these lessons, giving employees greater choices in how their work and families fit together and ultimately resulting in healthier, happier, more productive employees and better-performing organizations.

Source : https://www.humanresourcestoday.com/?open-article-id=13704231&article-title=the-future-of-work-after-covid–turning-crisis-into-positive-change&blog-domain=ultimatesoftware.com&blog-title=ultimate-software

The future of business and people strategy includes Freelancers

Technology brought speed and cost efficiency into work life, changing the focus of our attention.

Economic crises drilled into us the importance of agile and prudent management when the going is good.

But, medical emergencies like COVID-19 underscore the plethora of work engagements we have in the market. The highlight of so many conversations has been people costs versus output. For many companies, the COVID-19 crisis has presented an opportunity to change how we work – a way to manage costs without compromising on effectiveness.

It’s natural that those functions that obviously fall on the side of cost rather than revenue are the first to be targeted for cost management considerations. Minimum Full Time Employee (FTE) headcount has always been the easiest way to control cost. But the question is, is that the most efficient way of doing business. A lower headcount doesn’t mean that key business functions or services won’t suffer for it.

In my experience of running primary and secondary healthcare business, the solution is obvious – a combination of FTE, outsourcing and freelancing. They were the norm. In a business as socially integral as healthcare, FTEs provide necessary continuity, consistency, culture and brand building; but freelancers and outsourcing provided continuity, cost efficiency and convenience. Together they form the people strategy for business efficiency.

So having understood the value of FTEs, the real debate for me has been between outsourcing and engaging freelancers. From a cost perspective, outsourcing is often a matter of convenience rather than real savings. Legal compliance, cost of management time and effort, and convenience considerations generally tipped the balance towards outsourcing for me. Outsourcing offers continuity without the cost and hassle of attrition and re-hiring. On the other hand, it entails employing the outsource provider’s ‘person’ so it doesn’t necessarily provide the same flexibility as a freelancer.

Then, at some point, it becomes a challenge to distinguish between an outsourced contractor and an FTE. Simply because of daily proximity in the workplace, and the sense of belonging achieved, managing human expectations of reward and inclusion becomes difficult. It’s one thing to invite the contractor to a team dinner, it’s quite another to deal with the disappointment of not receiving a special holiday or gift granted to an FTE but not a contractor just by virtue of the ‘company’ being on the payroll not the person. And terminating the services of an outsourced consultant group or technical services company can have an impact similar to the retrenchment of your FTE!

Instead, freelancers are independent contractors – entrepreneurs, beholden only to themselves. Though not without its concerns, freelancing permits flexibility and the freedom to choose what you need done, when, and by whom, without commitments or remunerations outside of that job. The advantage of hiring freelancers for those functions where investment can in fact be scaled down is obvious – domain specialists, accountants, legal, finance and HR specialists are not always roles that require permanent resources.

Larger organizations and the healthcare industry have practiced this for so long that there are now systems in place, and processes to contract, manage, govern, and measure effective freelance performance and delivery.

With more and more members of the workforce, from Boomers to Gen Z, opting to contribute to the economy through freelance consulting and flexi-work, either out of choice or necessity, even small enterprises are able to utilize the available skills and talent freely. To harness this, the employment eco-system has intelligent deep technology platforms whose matchmaking abilities go beyond simply listing, allowing even SMEs to access valuable talent in a structured and trusting way.

COVID-19 has shown that working from home no longer needs to be an afterthought option for employees – in fact it has the potential to be of strategic advantage to business. So much so that with a combination of offsite-onsite working, it’s clear that freelance hiring is here to stay.

And let’s face it, the enterprises that have stood the test of time are those who have demonstrated prudence and adaptability in their business strategy. It’s time for Start Ups and SMEs to emulate them, build new ways of working into their business and people strategy, and benefit from the changing employment landscape.

“This article first appeared on solvecubehr blog              (https://solvecubehr.com/blog/)”

Tips For Managing Performance During The Coronavirus Crisis

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citizens, immigrants and visitors are
to move about the new international
barrier. The world was given a
hint on February 19, when the U.K.
government issued a statement on
its forthcoming revised immigration
policy. Within what some are calling
the ‘ambiguous’ brief, one change
is clear: the end of freedom of
movement. Read Jurga McClusky
and Ian Robinson’s article, Brexit:
What Talent Managers Must Know
Now, for answers to the frequently
asked questions that will help global
talent managers navigate these new
waters with confidence.
Apart from these articles, we
also have a few other informative
articles in this edition that focuses
on various aspects of talent
management. We hope you enjoy
reading all articles and look forward
to receiving your feedback.
Stay Safe!
EDITOR’S NOTE
The coronavirus has badly
affected our daily life. For the
workforce, the uncertainty over
remote working and job security has
caused an unwelcome and stressful
situation. Employee engagement,
performance and productivity have
dipped. How to help employees
thrive in the midst of such a crisis?
Not everyone can enjoy remote
working. It can lead to isolation
and loneliness, especially for those
extroverts. A recent survey by HBR
has found that two-thirds of remote
workers are not engaged and only
5% see themselves working at their
company long-term. While these
numbers reflect full-time remote
employees, they give us insights
into the importance of creating
the positive working environment
you typically have in the office
while employees are remote. Read
Rachel Ernst’s article, Tips For
Managing Performance During The
Coronavirus Crisis, to know how
to build a solid foundation to align
on key priorities, stay connected,
and build healthy behaviors during
this time.
In these unprecedented times,
when most businesses are
immobilized, business leaders
face the challenge of becoming
disconnected from customers,
suppliers and employees
sequestered in their homes. Market
opportunities have frozen. To
survive, leaders must change their
way of thinking. Instead of finding
opportunities in what were formally
viable business channels, they
must investigate new, unchartered
territory. Their employees can
help. Julia Ivy’s article, Mobilizing
Edgy Expertise In Times Of
Market Disruption, discusses the
step-by-step process of doing
it right.
Workplace stability has given way
to a wide variety of options about
where we work, when we work, how
we work, and with whom we work.
In the next decade, we’ll continue to
see technology fueling the power
to be selective about our work
lives. Read Marcus Mossberger’s
article, The 2030 Workplace, for
more insights.

Coronavirus is top of mind for company leaders,
managers, and employees. Many employees
are working remotely as a safety precaution. Now,
HR teams are asking us: how do we drive employee
performance during this time of uncertainty?
Not only is the barrage of bad news unsettling to
employees, but working remotely can feel isolated
and lonely, particularly for those extroverts. HBR
found that two-thirds of remote workers are not
engaged and only 5% see themselves working at their
company long-term. While these numbers reflect
full-time remote employees, they give us insights
into the importance of creating the positive working
environment you typically have in the office while
employees are remote.
Based on Reflektive’s best practices and insights from
HR experts, we’ve crafted recommendations to boost
employee success and help them thrive in the midst
of uncertainty. Whether you’re part of an HR team, a
manager, or an employee, these tips and tricks aim
to build a solid foundation to align on key priorities,
stay connected, and build healthy behaviors during
this time.

employees. We recommend questions on current
employee sentiment, and how employees feel about
the changes that your company made during the
coronavirus pandemic. Some questions you may want
to ask:
● I feel that employee needs were addressed by my
company during this time
● I have the resources I need to do my job well during
this time
● I know who to talk to if I have questions and
concerns during this time
● I feel confident in my company’s ability to handle
the impact of the coronavirus going forward
● I receive a good cadence of updates about what
my company is doing to address the situation
Remember to include a comments section for every
question — this enables you to gather more nuanced
information from employees. For more best practices
on using surveys to boost engagement, check out
some great Reflektive resources.
Have the right tools in place to boost remote
collaboration. Ensure that all employees have access
to email, a messaging platform such as Slack or
Microsoft Teams, and a video tool to communicate
effectively while working remotely. Ideally, employees
can provide recognition and plan for 1:1s on these
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 7 Submit Your Articles
platforms too. Team syncs, 1:1s, and all-hands
meetings should ideally take place over the video
to foster connection and enable employees to read
body language.
Establish norms for working remotely. By setting
guidelines early on, employees are more likely to
stay connected and productive during this time. We
recommend the following remote work best practices
for all employees:
● Adhere to expected daily working hours to
drive consistency
● Use project planning tools such as Wrike or Asana
to clearly define and communicate roles, responsibilities, and timelines
● Ask peers how they like to communicate, such as
their preferred channels, level of detail, and level
of informality
● Instill your workplace culture by celebrating
work anniversaries, business milestones, and
other accomplishments
Be a resource for your managers. Regularly check in
with managers to see how they are doing, and if they
need additional support or resources to manage their
teams remotely. We recommend biweekly manager
meetings to share best practices on driving employee
accountability, engagement and performance while
they’re remote.
For Managers
To the HR team, we recommend that you share recommendations with managers – ideally in a recurring
manager meeting – for further discussion and
reinforcement! Here’s a start:
Proactively check on employee stress. Fear and
anxiety are common reactions to this global pandemic.
Office and school closures can impact employees’
daily work environment. News and conversation
create more cause for concern among some of your
employees. By addressing employee stress early on,
you can help to alleviate it and accelerate the return to
normalcy. Some tips include:
● Sharing helpful resources to manage stress, such
as this NPR article and these CDC recommendations
● Asking what accommodations you can make to
alleviate stress
● Reminding employees that they can use sick leave
when they need it
● Encouraging employees to leverage the wellness
programs that your company offers
● Recommending walks and other activities that are
good for the mind and body
Keep your team connected. Fostering inclusivity,
visibility and engagement are very important for your
remote employees. Here are some ways you can
maintain team connectivity:
● Add 2-3 team virtual standups each week to
provide support, alignment and visibility for your
team. Use video, chat or the phone to help people
check-in on what they accomplished and what’s
new they’re working on.
● Create a virtual “watercooler” space: Ask
employees to increase their engagement on Slack
or MS Teams. Have employees hold peer 1:1s
or virtual coffee breaks to maintain socialization
and human interaction. Suggest some of these
ice-breaker questions to get them started:
● What did you have for breakfast this morning?
● Do you have any pets?
● What is your work from home
morning routine?
● What is your favorite thing to do on a Saturday
afternoon?
● Always having your camera on
● Staying muted when you’re not talking
● Rotating meeting facilitators to keep everyone
involved and visible
Tips For Managing Performance During The Coronavirus Crisis
● Set expectations for conference calls: Establish
communication norms, such as:
● Celebrate & recognize! Birthdays and
workversaries should continue to be celebrated,
and hard work and wins should be recognized,
now more than ever! Use Slack / MS Teams or
other chat channels, email and your Reflektive
Recognition Wall to make those exciting moments
visible to everyone.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 8 Submit Your Articles
● Have fun! Get creative with how to engage
your team. For example: ask everyone to pick
a Slack emoji that best represents them, or
have a song competition for the song title that
best summarizes your team (e.g., “Takin’ Care
of Business”).
Stick with your regular 1:1s. Communication and
transparency don’t come as naturally when we’re
working remotely, so they need to be prioritized. 1:1s
with your employees are extremely important for
creating alignment, setting expectations, and making
your employees feel heard and valued. If you have
time to meet more than once per week with your
employees, even if just for a quick 10-minute sync, we
recommend you do so. More best practices on 1:1s
are available in Reflektive’s Ultimate Guide to 1:1s.
Over-communicate and recognize the wins! No
longer can you simply share “good job” at the end
of a meeting as you’re exiting the conference room.
Instead, find ways to share praise publicly with
your company’s recognition tool. We recommend
increasing your feedback during this time, and
encouraging the behaviors you want and need.
Recognize exemplary remote collaboration, cheer
small projects, and appreciate adjustments your
team is making in their everyday work schedules.
This positive reinforcement delivered early and
regularly should help keep your team engaged and
motivated. Check out some recognition best practices
from Reflektive.
Clarify (or simply reinforce) goals and priorities.
Working on one’s own means that each direct report
will need to be good at self-management. For this to
work, each person will need to know what success
looks like for their projects, and accountability should
be created via regularly-scheduled check ins. We
recommend creating your own template that direct
reports can fill in, and aligning on expectations at the
beginning and end of every project. In some cases,
now may be a good time to step back and see if your
employees’ goals still make sense. For instance, if
one of your Customer Success Managers set a goal
to “Visit 4 customers per quarter”, he may decide to
change his goal to: “Improve implementation project
plans and share with all customers.” Set new goals
with your employee, and comment on the revised
goals to track progress. Some other great goals best
practices during the coronavirus are available in this
HBR article.
For Employees
Share the below strategies with all employees to
help them acclimate and succeed while they’re
working remotely.
Ask for feedback, often. Remember that you’re still
working on important initiatives for your company,
even while you’re remote. In fact, you may be learning
new skills and driving new projects during this time
of change. Now more than ever, we recommend that
you request feedback from your manager, peers, and
cross-functional stakeholders. The best times to ask
for this feedback are after major project milestones,
or when you complete projects. These insights will
help you learn and improve your performance in future
projects.
Use technology to feel more connected. We
recommend using video when you can — it also
helps you observe your coworkers’ body language
and better read cues! On your first video meetings as
a newly remote employee, we recommend that you
share your workspace. Introduce your peers to your
kids and pets too! Some other best practices include:
● Overcommunicate with Slack/ MSTeams and
email. When people are remote, it’s easier for
messages to get lost. Helpful tip: at the start
of the workday, share what you did yesterday
and what you are going to do that day. Another
great tip: share in channels rather than direct
message individuals so everyone can benefit from
the conversation
● Document everything and make it easily shareable
– so your peers can easily get caught up on your
projects
Revisit your work goals. Take a look at your current
goals, and determine if they still make sense given
the changes at your company. Perhaps there are
other projects that you’ve been postponing, but would
Tips For Managing Performance During The Coronavirus Crisis

add value to your peers, managers, or customers.
We also recommend using this time to invest in your
career by developing new skills or taking on different
projects. Your company is looking for employees to
be successful in this time of transition. Proving you
can thrive under stress builds your personal brand and
leadership’s confidence in your growth.
Dress for success. “If you look the part, you’ll feel the
part” says our Chief Sales Officer, David Laszewski.
Dress as if you’re going into the office, to stay in a
work mindset during working hours.
Get some fresh air! It’s finally springtime — take
advantage of it. Make time in your calendar to take
a walk and get some exercise. Some other wellness
recommendations when working from home are:
● Stay attuned to your mental health. Ask your
manager or HR representative about the resources
and programs available for employees to stay well
during this time.
● Be present. While it is important to see what’s
happening in the world, you don’t need to check
your phone or turn on the news every few minutes.
When you’re engaged in an activity or talking to a
family member, stay in the moment — and enjoy it!
● Stick to your regular schedule to help you feel
normalcy during this uncertain time. Take a shower
in the morning and get ready to start the day just
as you would to go into the office.
● Use technology to keep in touch with your family
and friends too!
If you’re interested in learning more about how to
boost performance for your newly remote workforce,
contact us here.
Would you like to comment?
Rachel Ernst is the VP of Employee
Success at Reflektive, a leading
performance management platform.
Tips For Managing Performance During The Coronavirus Crisis
Click here for a high-resolution Infographic
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 10 Submit Your Articles
The average person chalks up 90,000 hours at
work before they retire. Put into perspective,
that’s a third of our lives; work is our number one
activity after sleeping. Considering how much of our
lives we devote to it, it’s no wonder we expect our
work environments to reflect changing personal and
cultural priorities.
By 2030, the U.S. workforce will be dominated by
Millennials and Generation Z, about 136 million
individuals who prioritize work-life balance and
demand greater choice and control at work than
any generation before them. The most recent
Mercer Global Talent Trends study showed 54% of
respondents saying prioritizing work-life balance is
one of the top five things their company can do to
help them thrive. The cultural tide is turning, and the
employers that will attract the best and brightest of
the 2030 workforce are already adapting. They know
that technology will play a starring role when striking
The 2030 Workplace
By Marcus Mossberger
Balancing choice and control
the right balance between choice and control for
their employees.
A study by Mars Drinks reviewed the attitudes of
4,000 workers across North America and found that
participants who report they “have control over the
things that are important to me” were also highly likely
to have a sense of well-being at work. A sense of
control also correlated with better performance, with
these workers 57% more likely to be engaged, 55%
more likely to be collaborative, and 53% more likely to
be productive than those lacking a sense of control.
As the baby boomer generation continues its exodus
from the workforce, there are fewer workers who
remember that once-upon-a-time workers spent the
majority of their career with just one employer. This
notion of lifetime employment is not only a relic of the
past, it has less appeal than ever before, especially
for millennials who embrace not only changing
employers, but also careers.
FEATURE
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 11 Submit Your Articles
This is partly a reflection of the times we live in; the
pace and degree of change driven by technological
advancements, evolving social norms, and disruptive
business models, have nurtured change agility in
younger generations. The nature of work is also
increasingly temporary and project-based, enabling
workers’ desire for more choice. The time is right for
employers to reimagine the workplace.
Support for greater employee choice and control
is now frequently happening before the employee
has even signed a contract. When a job candidate
reaches the offer stage, more organizations are using
a “choose your own adventure” format to determine
work arrangements that were previously rigid and
austere. Some members of younger generations
are coming to work with expectations such as being
able to work four days a week, with two of them from
home. In other cases, employers are even allowing
new employees to choose their project and their
manager.
There can be more troubling outcomes from
flexible scheduling. Erratic and uncontrollable work
schedules pose a significant risk to lower-income,
part-time workers, especially as more people adopt
the practice of working multiple jobs at the same
time. Considering that Generation Z will be the first
workforce that can’t remember a world without
smartphones, organizations should consider how
mobile technology can help feel workers feel more
in control. For example, mobile scheduling apps can
let employees select their own schedule or swap
shifts with a colleague. The same can be said for
professional development and training. According
to The Center for Generational Kinetics, 85% of
Generation Z watched at least one video online
in the past week to learn a new skill, a trend that
future-looking organizations should consider when
onboarding and upskilling workers.
The 2030 workforce is also likely to see new attitudes
towards compensation and payment. According to
Doug Politi, President of Compliance Solutions at ADP,
“The way millennials are interacting with tech and
money, the expectation of immediacy will ultimately
change the way we get paid.” Some organizations are
exploring the idea of giving people options related to
how and when they are paid. Wal-Mart, the biggest
employer in the U.S., is utilizing an app called Even to
provide employees with instant access to their wages,
and we might predict similar technologies will be
rolled out to more organizations as workforce demand
for choice continues to increase.
This could also translate into employee demand to
“pick your perks.” For instance, if you are comfortable
with the risk, you may decide to take the bulk of your
compensation in the form of stock options, potentially
double a traditional salary. Or if you’re risk-averse you
may choose the lower salary paired with a Cadillac
benefit plan that will ensure complete coverage of
your health-related needs. Approximately 32% of
payroll is now spent on benefits (a 19% increase
in the last eight years) and the wellbeing market
is growing (currently estimated to be a $46 billion
industry) so we are likely to see more options and
flexibility as we move toward 2030. In addition, the
2030s could see artificial intelligence (AI) platforms
introduced to organizations to help employees pick
the right benefits for them. Employees could chat with
AI-powered virtual assistants about their personal
lifestyles, goals, and requirements and receive
tailored, data-driven advice on their benefits plans.
Workplace stability has given way to a wide variety
of options about where we work, when we work,
how we work, and with whom we work. In the next
decade, we’ll continue to see technology fueling the
power to be selective about our work lives. A gold
watch in return for forty years of loyal service may
not be available to the next generation, but a newly
empowering structure of work may prove to be much
more valuable in the long run.
The 2030 Workplace
Would you like to comment?
Marcus Mossberger is Senior Director,
Industry and Solution Strategy at Infor.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 12 Submit Your Articles
Some people are work-from-home champions.
For them, working from home means fewer
distractions, more flexibility, and greater productivity.
They have the perfect home-office setup, they stick
to a careful routine, and they crank out high-quality
work day in and day out. But not everyone falls into
this category. For some, remote work can be quite
a challenge, full of countless distractions, grueling
hours, and high stress.
If you are in this second category, don’t worry—you
aren’t alone, especially as so many employees are
now being asked to work from home for the first
time. We’ve put together this guide with the five most
important tips for working remotely to help you do
great work no matter where you are.
#1 Overcommunicate
When team members and managers can’t see
each other sitting at their desks hard at work, it’s
dangerously easy to assume the worst: “Why didn’t
they answer my chat message?” “Are they even
5 Essential Tips For
Working Remotely
By Tori Fica
Transform your work-from-home experience
working right now?” “Working from home doesn’t
mean vacation time.”
Trust is imperative for remote teams to work well
together, and without proper communication, that
trust breaks down. Here’s how you can keep up
effective communication while working remotely:
● Set a regular time to check in on chat in the
morning or throughout the day.
● Don’t hesitate to schedule a video call (cameras
on) to discuss things when email and chat don’t
cut it.
● Consider scheduling video check-ins that aren’t
focused on work. These social meetups can help
you stay connected and feel supported.
● If you need to step away from your computer now
and then (which we all do), drop a note in your
team chat to let them know you’re taking a break
and when you’ll be back online. A quick sign-off at
lunch and the end of the day is a good idea, too.
● If you need some help or support to be more
effective, let your manager know. On that same
note, reach out to your teammates to see if there’s
any way you can help them while remote.
One of the best quotes about communication is from
writer George Bernard Shaw: “The single biggest
problem in communication is the illusion that it has
taken place.” When working from home, it’s easy for
people to withdraw into their own silos and assume
everyone is on the same page—only to discover that’s
not the case at all. Both employees and managers
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 13 Submit Your Articles
can help their teams (and themselves) become
better remote workers by communicating early and
often. Create a great company culture even with
remote employees.
#2 Develop a Routine
When you work from home, your commute time
shrinks to zero, your housemates become your
officemates, and your breakroom is your kitchen.
Because of the convenience of working from home,
it’s tempting to slide out of your normal routine and
stop waking up early or changing out of your pajamas.
Don’t give in!
You may not be able to stick to your old routine
exactly as it was, but you should still structure
your day. Here’s how you can do that while working
from home:
● Wake up on time, giving yourself enough time to
get ready in the morning before the workday starts.
● You don’t have to put on a blouse or tie, but do
the basics to get ready for the day ahead, like
showering, brushing your teeth, and getting
dressed. You may even want to put on shoes to
help get into the mentality of going to work.
● Start the workday by deciding what you want to
focus on that day. You can use a traditional to-do
list or something more sophisticated like project
management software.
● Organize your calendar so it includes all your
meetings and appointments. You can block
out time for focused work as well as breaktime
activities like walking your dog or doing
the laundry.
● You don’t have to map out every minute of every
day to be an effective remote worker, but it helps
to establish a clear, consistent routine. Not only
can this make you more productive, but it also
helps those living with you (like kids and significant
others) know when you’re available and when they
need to let you focus.
#3 Take Care of Yourself
While you’re working from home, especially in
emergency situations like a pandemic, you may feel
pressure to squeeze every ounce of productivity out
of your day. And many of us measure our productivity
by how many tasks we check off our to-do lists. When
things are left undone at the end of the day, we feel
guilty, like we should be doing more.
That may not be the best approach, particularly if
you’re still transitioning to remote work and settling
into a new way of doing things. Often, slowing down
and taking time for yourself are the keys to unlocking
greater productivity. Here are some self-care tips for
working remotely:
● Schedule regular breaks to stand, move around, get
away from your computer, or eat a meal. Breaks
can help you recharge and refocus, making you
more effective in your work.
● Exercise and get outside regularly. Even a simple
walk around the block can do wonders for your
health both physically and mentally.
● Practice mindfulness to lower stress and build your
focus. This can be especially helpful in turbulent
times while you’re adjusting to new circumstances
like working remotely.
● Be patient with yourself as you transition to
working from home. Instead of focusing on how
much you accomplish each day, ask yourself how
you contributed. Not everything of value ends up
on a to-do list.
● Set a cut-off time at the end of the day when you
disconnect and “go home.” This is important for
maintaining a healthy work-life balance as you
work remotely.
Doing the basics to take care of yourself will make
you a healthier, happier, and more effective worker
whether you’re in an office or at home. Not only will
you be more productive, but you’ll also avoid burning
out over time despite the stress and other challenges.
#4 Create the Right Environment
If you’ve never worked from home before, or if you
only do it occasionally, you probably don’t have an
ideal home-office setup. Maybe your “home office” is
actually the kitchen table or a desk in your unfinished
basement. When you don’t have a proper workspace,
5 Essential Tips For Working Remotely
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 14 Submit Your Articles
5 Essential Tips For Working Remotely
it can be tricky to focus on your work. Here are some
strategies for creating the best home-office setup for
productivity without remodeling the house:
● Designate a workspace for yourself, however
small, where only work takes place. It can be one
side of the kitchen table, or a lap desk and the
sofa. The important thing is to set clear boundaries
for yourself and others: When you’re there,
you’re working.
● Communicate with others in your home to let them
know you need focus time. You could even set up
a sign to indicate when you’re working and when
you’re taking a break.
● Make sure your space is clean with minimal
distractions. The last thing you need while trying
to focus on work is a constant reminder of
housework that needs to be done.
● Schedule uninterrupted focus time. Eliminating
distractions from your home environment won’t
do much good if your email, chat, and phone
notifications won’t leave you alone. Set aside time
to put everything on mute (informing your team
first, of course) and work without interruptions.
If you have the budget and space, it’s certainly worth
investing in a more permanent home office. However,
even without an immaculate home office, you can be
productive and focused while working remotely if you
set the right boundaries.
#5 Use the Right Tools
The previous tips for creating the right environment
become even easier if you have the right tools for
working remotely. There are numerous resources,
both online and offline, you can use to set yourself up
for success while working at home, but these are a
few of our favorites:
● Get noise-canceling headphones to help you shut
out distractions and concentrate, especially if you
find yourself trying to work while your children or
roommates are home.
● Use a standing desk or standing desk converter
to get your blood flowing and relieve the strain of
sitting all day.
● A comfortable chair can make or break your
work-from-home experience. If you’re limited on
budget or space, a seat cushion and back pad can
also help.
● Try an egg timer to help you focus for stretches of
time. You can also use a timer on your computer or
phone if it won’t be too distracting.
These are just a few tools you can use at home to
help work effectively, but there are plenty more online.
And at an organizational level, your company can
invest in additional tools like a chat platform or project
management software to keep everyone connected
while working remotely.
Conclusion
Learning to work from home effectively is tricky for
anyone, let alone employees who have been asked
to do so suddenly and unexpectedly. If you’re feeling
overwhelmed by the unique challenges of remote
work, cut yourself some slack. You don’t have to
perfect these five areas right away. Instead, focus on
what you can do today to improve step by step while
working from home. Wake up 30 minutes earlier and
go on a walk. Make a list of priorities at the start of
your day. Choose one thing to buy to improve your
home workspace.
As you take it one day at a time and use the tips in
this guide, you can transform your work-from-home
experience. Whether you’re working remotely for only
a few weeks or for the rest of your career, you’ll be
able to do your best.
Would you like to comment?
Tori Fica is a Senior Copywriter for
BambooHR. Through research, analysis,
and writing, she creates content to help
HR professionals think and plan more
strategically. Her focus is on taking
complex ideas and in-depth research
and turning them into clear, digestible
pieces of content.

Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 16 Submit Your Articles
I
n the last post, we heard from a
Logistics Flow Analyst who was
losing her motivation to meet a
deadline after a deadline. I agreed
that constant deadlines suck and
that she had the right to feel the
way she was feeling.
What about performance goals?
Do they help employees focus
and deliver superior results? Or
do they add pressure and subtract
motivation? Do they give meaning
to our work or take it away?
If you know me or if you’ve
read Who the Hell Wants to Work
for You? Chapter 4, Set Goals, then
you know I am a big fan of goals. It
may even be the main reason I own
a business. A business is a moving
target, and I love chasing it.
Of course, I can’t do it alone. My
partner Vivek and I rely on every
Are Performance
Goals Motivating Or
Demoralizing Your
Employees?
By Tim Eisenhauer
If you leave your employees with no room to fail,
you cannot expect them to learn and grow
one of our employees to play the
game with us. It has to be the
same game. The same end goals
divided up according to each
employee’s job and skills. We want
them to feel the ownership over
their part of the collective goal.
But if there’s one thing we want to
avoid, it’s pressure.
In sports, pressure is something
you want your opponents to feel.
Not your teammates. Tactics like
“full-court pressure” or “pressure
on the quarterback” are directed
against the other team. The
goal is to get them to crack, lose
their concentration, and make
stupid mistakes.
Hardly something you wish for the
people you manage, yet there’s
a belief that bullying people into
accepting a “stretch goal” will
somehow get you closer to it.
I’ve heard this especially from
managers of public companies
who live and die by their
quarterly numbers.
The goals come all the way
from the top, and the managers
feel they have no choice but to
pass them down the chain of
command. Once the pressure
has reached the rank-and-file,
where can it go next? Of course!
The customers.
Do the words “channel stuffing”
mean anything to you? They come
from the manufacturing sector
and refer to a practice of forcing
distributors to accept product
shipments for which there’s no
demand. Channel stuffing creates
the illusion of moving inventories,
and, with some creative
accounting, can mimic sales.

Are Performance Goals Motivating Or Demoralizing Your Employees?
Accounting is the last stop for
the corporate pressure-cooker.
When nothing else gives, there’s
always cooking the books.
Creative accounting aims to shift
the pressure from the company to
investors. When there’s too much
pressure on the investors, the
stock price falls, and the pressure
comes back full-circle to the
top management.
If the manager keeps pushing the
pressure down the line, eventually
it will backfire. We all know
what comes next: bankruptcies,
resignations, lawsuits, even
suicides. And if the story goes
public, we learn the names of the
guilty parties. We learn about their
families. We learn too much.
But we don’t always realize
that we are walking the same
slippery slope.
Corporate scandals have become
almost as commonplace as
corporate pressure. Every year
“another one bites the dust.” In
2016 we saw a handful of surprise
resignations, but nothing like the
media circus and political fanfare
surrounding Wells Fargo Chairman
and CEO John Stumpf.
Stumpf retired abruptly in October,
forfeiting his 2016 bonus and
$41 million in unvested shares.
Earlier that year, investment
research firm Morningstar had
named him CEO of the Year.
And in 2013, Fortune magazine
readers picked him as their
Businessperson of the Year. Wall
Street regularly praised Stumpf for
his company’s earnings and stock
performance. Until recently, Wells
Fargo was the only major bank
to have regained its market cap
since the 2008 financial crisis.
The reason for his fall from grace
was the massive fraud Wells
Fargo employees perpetrated
under his command. Between
2011 and 2016, retail banking
employees opened over 1.5
million deposit accounts and
issued over 500,000 credit
card applications on behalf of
customers who never asked for
or knew about it. The employees
also transferred money from the
customers’ legitimate accounts
into the phony ones, causing
overdraft and insufficient-funds
fees. Wells Fargo charged
$2.6 million in fees related to
unauthorized accounts.
In 2013, the LA Times got hold of
several Wells Fargo customers
and former employees who filed
lawsuits against the company.
The complaints dated all the way
back to 2009. In December 2013,
the newspaper ran the story by E.
Scott Reckard under the headline,
“Wells Fargo’s pressure-cooker
sales culture comes at a cost.»
The article caught the attention
of the City of Los Angeles and
federal regulators. On September
8, 2016, the regulators fined Wells
Fargo $185 million. John Stumpf
was called to testify in front of
the Senate Banking Committee,
and the calls for his resignation
poured in.
In hindsight, everyone, including
Stumpf, agreed that insane
pressure to meet sales targets
pushed employees over the edge.
Stumpf became CEO in 2007, and
in 2008, Wells Fargo acquired
insolvent Wachovia Bank. Stumpf
saw aggressive cross-selling as
his chance to create growth in
the distressed financial sector.
“Eight is great” became his call to
action, pushing employees to sell
every customer into eight Wells
Fargo products.
This is how one Wachovia branch
employee from Allentown,
Pennsylvania remembers it:
“Wells Fargo doubled our goals
and decreased our performance
pay. Every year the goals went up
more and more. Everyone was on
anti-anxiety medication.” 1
At the time of the LA
Times investigation, management
held branch employees to a
minimum of four products
per customer for 80% of the
customers, with the stretch goal
of eight products per household.
Regional bosses passed down
daily quotas for new accounts and
cross-selling. Branch managers
had to commit to 120% of the
quotas and report the results at
the end of each day.
The reporting took place during
a region-wide conference call.
The managers who came
up short were humiliated in
front of sixty of their peers.
Anticipating the nightly drills and
worse, branch managers took
desperate measures:
“If we didn’t hit our numbers,
branch managers would make us
stay after work for an hour, with
no pay, to cold call customers
and try to sell accounts,” said
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 18 Submit Your Articles
Tim Eisenhauer is president and
co-founder of Axero Solutions, a
leading intranet software vendor.
He’s also a bestselling author of Who
the Hell Wants to Work for You?:
Mastering Employee Engagement.
Would you like to comment?
a former Charlotte, North
Carolina employee.
And the result?
“A lot of people would make up
accounts so they could leave.” 2
The LA Times points out that fake
accounts were not the first line
of defense. Employees begged
their families and friends to open
new accounts. When that wasn’t
enough, they found creative
solutions. Canoga Park, California,
employees opened premium
accounts for Latino immigrants.
The premium status allowed the
immigrants to send money back
across the border free of charge
but required a minimum balance
of $25,000 within three months
of opening the account—or a
$30 monthly fee. To meet sales
quotas and keep the customers
happy, branch employees would
downgrade the original accounts
and open new premium ones
before the fees kicked in.
Short of any sales opportunities,
employees turned to their loved
ones to open ghost accounts.
And short of that, they forged
signatures of strangers to request
credit cards and equity lines.
They added overdraft protection,
PIN numbers, online access, and
other features that counted as
“products.”
When customers discovered
these unwanted services,
employees blamed a computer
error. Another trick was to change
the customer’s address to the
employee’s to hide from the
customer the credit card opened
in his name. Many customers had
no idea until the new credit card
showed up on their credit report.
Wells Fargo tried to keep these
problems under wraps by
settling the lawsuits and firing
branch-level employees. Between
2011 and 2016, 5,300 employees
lost their jobs for cheating to
meet goals. And some got fired
for blowing the whistle on the
company. In 2016, when the
story went worldwide, John
Stumpf finally admitted that the
goals were to blame for abusive
practices. On September 13, 2016,
he put an end to cross-selling:
“We are eliminating product sales
goals because we want to make
certain our customers have full
confidence that our retail bankers
are always focused on the best
interests of customers.”
Stumpf’s announcement did not
silence his critics. Half a dozen
federal agencies investigated
Wells Fargo. Among them is
the Securities and Exchange
Commission (SEC), which took a
keen interest in the bank’s loan
accounting practices.
For most of his life, John Stumpf
was an all-American success
story. He grew up on a farm in
a family of eleven kids. Stumpf
has credited his upbringing with
his work ethic and his reliance
on teamwork. So, where did he
go wrong?
There’s nothing wrong with stretch
goals. Nor with asking employees
to pitch in.
However…
If pressure is your only strategy,
you won’t likely get the result you
want. If you leave your employees
with no room to fail, you cannot
expect them to learn and grow.
Pressure doesn’t strengthen
your company.
Pressure looks for the weakest
link. And it always finds one.
If you’re tired of pressure, you
might like my book, because it
gives you better options

Now more than ever, companies need software
and data, and the people who can manage them,
to stay competitive. Machine learning, artificial
intelligence and predictive analytics are built by
software and feed on data. Not just any data – data
that has been harvested, cleaned, stored, analyzed
and leveraged. The chief architects of these systems
are data scientists – highly skilled mathematicians
and programmers. Data scientists are not able to do
this work alone. Data scientists need data engineers
Finding Tech Talent In
Unexpected Places
By Desa Burton
What HR executives need to know
to stay competitive
and data analysts to help accomplish this work. Data
engineers and data analysts help data scientists
perform at peak efficiency. Without them, a critical
piece of the data team is missing.
Staying Competitive in a Small Talent
Pond
This year, data science and analytics job openings
are projected to grow by nearly 15 percent with
364,000 job listings expected, according to a report
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 21 Submit Your Articles
by Burning Glass Technologies, BHEF and IBM.
What’s more, when these jobs open, they often remain
unfilled longer than other tech positions, signaling
that it is much harder for companies to find qualified
candidates.
So, how do big and small companies compete in a
relatively limited talent pond? By thinking outside the
box. Employers and the HR function within businesses
need to do two things:
1. Find innovative ways to bridge the skills gap,
through re-skilling and up-skilling, and
2. Consider qualified talent that does not have
traditional 4-year college degrees.
Why? Because in this fast-paced, technology-driven
world, more people are jumping into different careers
during different points of their lives with different
backgrounds, so employers need to be ready to
embrace the unconventional, non-traditional and
unexpected. As Alvin Toffler, the famous Futurist says,
“The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who
cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn,
unlearn, and relearn.”
Placing Skills Ahead of Degrees
Gone are the days of thinking a 4-year college degree
is needed to succeed in white-collar careers. Today,
it is becoming more of the norm, due to time, money
and personal factors, for adults to seek non-traditional
education options to learn and earn, especially in the
technology industry. As this new way of learning is
becoming more mainstream, senior business leaders
need to keep up with this changing mindset. While
recruitment continues at a rapid pace, an emerging
key to staying competitive is placing skills ahead of
degrees when hiring technical talent.
It is predicted that 65 percent of children entering
primary school will end up in jobs that don’t yet exist,
according to the World Economic Forum. Now is the
time to start building short-term and long-term hiring
roadmaps for your organization, reimagine hiring
requirements to become more nimble and diverse,
and waive the traditional four-year degree hiring
requirement to stay competitive. Highly-skilled and
passionate tech talent that has attended immersion
programs or software coding and data engineering
bootcamps like Zip Code Wilmington, one of the
country’s first nonprofit coding bootcamp, is available
to fill tech positions and can add value from the first
day on the job.
Indeed.com conducted a survey of more than
1,000 HR managers and technical recruiters at U.S.
companies of all sizes, and found that 72 percent
of employers think bootcamp grads are “just as
prepared” to be high performers as degree holders.
And, more than half of those surveyed said that hiring
bootcamp graduates is a good way to find job seekers
from underrepresented groups in the technology
sector.
Recruiting, Reskilling or Upskilling
through Bootcamps
Coding bootcamps are uniquely designed to ‘tech-up’
skilled and unskilled workers to become software
coders, data engineers and data analysts by offering
expedited training programs in this skillset to keep up
with rapid tech demands, societal changes and talent
supply.
Software coding and data engineering bootcamps
give adults the opportunity to begin or change their
career path and give companies the option to up-skill
their current workforce. This is a growing trend
as seen in the Delaware tech community which is
comprised of several large companies such as M&T
Bank, CSC, BlackRock, and Marlette Funding. If HR
and technology leadership teams stay open minded
and welcome new ways of attracting, finding and
retaining talent, they will help their companies stay
competitive.
Would you like to comment?
Desa Burton is Executive Director at Zip
Code Wilmington, a premier nonprofit
coding school located in Delaware.
Finding Tech Talent In Unexpected Places
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Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 23 Submit Your Articles
On January 31, 2020, the U.K.
officially cut ties with the
European Union, but didn’t clarify
how U.K. citizens, immigrants and
visitors are to move about the new
international barrier. The world
was given a hint on February 19,
when the U.K. government issued
a statement on its forthcoming
revised immigration policy.
Within what some are calling the
‘ambiguous’ brief, one change
is clear: the end of freedom
of movement.
As the statement says, “employers
will need to adjust,” how they
send foreign workers to the U.K.,
which has understandably created
anxiety among human resources
professionals who’ve been given
the task. For instance, starting
January 1, 2021, worldwide travel
to the U.K. will be governed by
a new points system that will
“transform the way in which all
migrants come to the U.K. to work,
study, visit or join their family.”
Brexit: What Talent
Managers Must
Know Now
By Jurga McClusky and Ian Robinson
Here are answers to some
frequently asked questions
FEATURE
The system will apply to EU and
non-EU migrants equally, and is
designed to favor entry for skilled
workers, students, leaders and
innovators while reducing reliance
on low-skilled labor from Europe.
Here are answers to some
frequently asked questions that
will help global talent managers
navigate these new waters with
confidence.
What Will Change with the
New Immigration Bill?
The new immigration bill has
broad implications for employers
who rely on migrant labor from
the EU. Because of the costs and
fees associated with work visas,
employers will be less likely to hire
people outside the U.K. unless
they must due to skills shortages.
By design, the new immigration
bill will make it difficult and
expensive for companies to bring
low-skilled labor from Europe into
the U.K.
Companies that find it challenging
to locate the skills they need
will have to be creative about
how they fill jobs, particularly
for positions that don’t require
a degree or special skills. Some
employers are already targeting
harder to reach groups, for
instance, older workers, women
returners and ex-service people.
Global companies may also shift
some operations abroad if that
makes sense from a financial and
talent management standpoint;
media reports suggest it’s already
happening in some sectors,
like finance.
Some industries will almost
certainly experience labor
shortages when the new rules
go into effect in January 2021.
Industries will be stress-tested,
and the U.K. government may
make adjustments to the rules.
The economy will likely be in a
different place as well several
months down the road. The policy
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 24 Submit Your Articles
Brexit: What Talent Managers Must Know Now
statement says the government
will monitor labor market data to
detect pressure in key sectors.
What Should HR
Organizations Do?
Understanding the implications
of upcoming changes is the key
to navigating them successfully.
The U.K. government’s policy
statement contains valuable
details on the design and scope
of the points system, salary and
skills thresholds, the visa process,
border crossing requirements and
much more. It’s a great place to
start.
HR and talent managers will
also need to work closely with
senior leaders to formulate a
strategy going forward. The
government will provide guidance
in the summer, and companies
can formulate a more detailed
strategy then. But in the interim,
it’s advisable to determine where
skills shortfalls are likely to occur
and how much time and money
the company will invest in fees
and benefits for migrant labor.
As companies recruit employees
and make hiring decisions, they
should exercise caution, keeping
the new rules in mind while
avoiding broadly discriminating
against candidates based on
their country of origin. The
best approach is to consider
candidates on the basis of their
skillset only, and then factor
in the prospective employee’s
immigration status when making
hiring decisions.
HR professionals and talent
management specialists who are
working with foreign nationals in
the U.K. should begin the process
of applying for work visas now, if
they haven’t already. Collecting
documents, gathering approvals,
etc., is a time-consuming process.
It’s also a good idea to update
HR handbooks and reach out
to affected employees to offer
residency assistance and let them
know what to expect.
How Can HR Professionals
and Talent Managers
Stay Informed and Get
Prepared?
Staying up-to-date in a fluid
situation is important, and the
U.K. government’s “what you need
to know” page features links to
basic information, updates and an
opt-in link to receive email alerts
about new information when it
becomes available. Talent mobility
trade associations and vendors
are a valuable source of data on
skills shortages and signing up for
immigration law firm alerts is also
a great idea.
The good news is that thanks to
the length of time it took from
the original Brexit vote to the
current transition period, some
– but not all – global companies
have had time to determine
their employees’ immigration
status and identify where staff
are working. That information is
critical in implementing a talent
mobility strategy, which will be
more important than ever when
the new U.K. immigration law
takes effect.
That said, when the government
releases guidance this summer,
many companies will experience a
time crunch as they race to ensure
that needed talent is in place.
To avoid being overwhelmed, it
may make sense to add staff to
handle the influx of planning and
documentation. The best strategy
right now is to stay informed and
prepare in advance, and there’s
no time like the present to get
started.
Jurga McClusky is a partner and
head of immigration at Deloitte, and
chair of the immigration committee at
Worldwide ERC.
Ian Robinson is a partner at Fragomen
LLP, a member of Worldwide ERC.
Would you like to comment?
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Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 26 Submit Your Articles
When it comes to business transformation, what
is HR’s responsibility?
Believe it or not, it’s not only the job of top
management, rather it takes a holistic approach
where everyone is aligned with the company vision.
It’s important to note that, HR is a crucial part of
successful business transformation as it bridges
the gap between job roles and creates a winning
company culture.
Owning Employee
Transformation: The
Important Role of HR
By Dr. Patti Fletcher and Shrikant Pattahil
Podcast with guest Shrikant Pattahil on
disrupting your cradle-to-grave HR strategy
In this week’s podcast, I invited Shrikant Pattahil, the
President of Harbinger Systems and Lead Architect
of Harbinger Offline Content Player, to discuss
how changes in organizations are happening so
fast because of technology. HR is the catalyst for
transformation and they have to be independent and
adaptive to changes; HR has to lead.
PODCAST
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 27 Submit Your Articles
Owning Employee Transformation: The Important Role of HR
I asked about the personalization trends where
you bring people onboard and upscale them in the
right ways. According to Shrikant, “HR needs to
make sure they have onboarding programs, learning
management programs, or learning rescaling
programs specifically targeted to each and every
job role.
I’m delighted to be able to sit down and talk to
Shrikant about this topic. Here are some of the
highlights of our conversation:
Business transformation is quite the
topic, Shrikant, and it’s been an ongoing
conversation for a long time and yet very
little has been done about it. Business is
ripe for disruption and HR is ready for
transformation. The problem is those words
have all become buzzwords at this point.
Can you talk to us a little bit about what this
actually means when we say this is about HR
transforming?
If you look at the next 15 to 20 years in the
organization’s history or any organization’s history
they have to transform so rapidly because technology
is changing so fast especially organizations with more
than a thousand employees or more. They have to
take the employees consistently and every three to
five years things are changing. So HR needs to play a
very crucial role in this.
So if they are well aligned with the organization’s
strategy I think the process is going to be much
smoother and faster. HR, overall, needs to take more
ownership about transforming employees and not
leave it to just the leadership but be a leader
and part of that.
That can be done if they actually become more
technology aware and they’re more tech-savvy and
they don’t only depend on their partners and the
vendors for all the information so they have to take
the lead.
We understand that there is a scale thing but
times have changed and particularly around
the importance of listening to our employees,
what motivates them and what does not, and
what our role is in bridging the gap between
employee expectations and the experience
of work. We hear things like this all of the
time now: “Look, what I want as a worker is
something that appeals to me, that’s based on
me, that gets me from where I am to where
you want to be in the company.” So talk to us
a little bit about some of the personalization
trends particularly around bringing new
people on board and then being able to
upscale them in the right ways.
Patti, that’s a great point and I think there is one thing
that is very important and we all know that today,
people join organizations they are not looking for
a lifetime to be spent in the organization. They are
looking at probably 3 years, 5 years and what they can
achieve in thatspace.
So what HR needs to make sure is that they
have onboarding programs, they have learning
management programs, or learning rescaling
programs specifically targeted to each and every job
role. They cannot look at you knowing we have one
single system which will cater to everybody in the
organization and they need to make sure that every
2-3 years as the organization is changing.
They need to consider that we’re big investments,
almost like platforms and then build small
applications and new innovative solutions both in
terms of processes as well as technology, so that
they can really transform and change as the industry
demands and keep the workforce highly productive
and highly engaged.

Owning Employee Transformation: The Important Role of HR
You said something that is so critical that I
really want to call out, and that is when you
set up systems for people who you intend
to have them start at a young age and leave
when they retire. Can you talk a little bit
about the employee experience component
of where this fits in from getting rid of the
cradled agreement and what HR should care
about and think about?
Right now I think employee experience is the main
thing that every HR has top of mind. What happens
is, many people confuse user experience as a
learning experience. But employee experience really
means people have to be better productive and
better engaged. HR kind of defines what employee
experience means for their organization and for
different teams that they’re catering to and then select
the right tools and technologies to do that.
So it has to connect with everybody because
everybody is playing a crucial role in pushing the
organization forward. I think that’s something, from an
employee experience, that I feel organizations need
to take into consideration and HR for most needs to
understand and do that.
Shrikant, that is so interesting! There’s
something that you said that really triggered a
mindset shift and that about users of systems
that we invested in. What you are saying is, in
this new world where people are not cradleto-grave and probably even when they were,
we’re not talking about users we’re talking
about people! Understanding where those
people work organizationally and physically,
how they want to work, what devices they
want to use, or what kind of jobs they do
requires taking that person-first not user-first
approach. That’s a huge transformation in
mindset and in practice!
What’s your call to action to help HR
practitioners and leaders to start shifting
toward where they need to be?
My call-to-action is to make sure that from an HR
standpoint, you are as tech aware because you cannot
just be dependent on others to drive how HRs on the
technology side is going to do that option and help
organizations change.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 29 Submit Your Articles
Owning Employee Transformation: The Important Role of HR
Dr. Patti Fletcher
Chief Equity Advocate & HR Disrupter,
HR.com
Shrikant Pattahil
President of Harbinger Systems
and Lead Architect of Harbinger
Offline Content Player
HR.com Live!
Would you like to comment?
Secondly, you need to think about, you know each,
you cannot think about a whole platform solving your
entire HR needs or people needs. So you need a
platform but you also need a lot of solutions that are
tailor-made to each and every department and you
need to be prepared to handle that and facilitate so
that you know every department can function in the
best possible way to help the organization.
Third and most important, I think it’s only in their
headquarters but all the employees, the remote
employees, the gate workers, and everybody that HR
means to think about when it comes to his employee
experience and help them not with just better user
interface and better tools but actually see if those
are helping them be more productive and be more
engaged in their day to work and achieving the goals
that they’re looking forward to achieve.
The last point that Shrikant shared really brings us full
circle to where you begin. Technology is important
but you need to figure out what you want to do with it.
Think about “What is the problem we’re trying to solve
here?” They are called missions after all.
the firm to grow outwards in directions its
founders had never anticipated.
When the number of employees in a workplace grows
so fast, companies face two main problems. Let’s call
them alignment and accountability. The question of
alignment is one of a shared vision: what are we all
aiming for? Inculcating a workplace to adopt common
goals is frequently time-consuming and while the
concept might sound vague, it is essential to foster
positive internal communication. Accountability,
meanwhile, is the issue of who is responsible for
what. How many times have you heard new and even
not-so-new employees asking, ‘Who in the office is
responsible for…?’? Now imagine how cacophonous
those questions sound when 90% of the workplace
has been at the company for less than a year.
Responding to the twin challenges of alignment
and accountability requires a strategy. These issues
can become very disruptive, very fast, if they’re not
addressed with a holistic solution. Alignment and
accountability are essential components of HR
management, especially in companies focused on a

the Key Results are the way you’re going to know if
you’re getting there. For example, an Objective can
be, ‘We will delight our customers’, and one of the
accompanying Key Results could be ‘increasing our
Net Promotor Score to 75%’. When Google was using
OKR while launching its first web browser, its Key
Result was 20 million Chrome users within a year
(which it didn’t achieve). But by revising its targets,
Google targeted 100 million Chrome users within
three years of operation – which it easily surpassed.
In order to work properly, Key Results must be
measurable, and must describe outcomes rather than
activities. For instance, ‘Be nicer to customers’ cannot
be a Key Result, because it’s not measurable. Once we
make that goal a bit more precise, by saying ‘Reduce
the number of complaints about customer service to
less than one per week’, we have a measurable Key
Result. ‘Spend at least five hours training the customer
service team on using FooDesk’ is also not a Key
Result, because it’s an activity rather than an outcome.
We can make it into a Key Result by specifying the
outcome: ‘Get no more than two support requests
from customer service per week about how to use
FooDesk’. That also empowers teams, because it
gives them greater flexibility in determining how to
go about achieving their aims, removing the need for
micro-management.
OKRs have to be transparent. Everyone at the
company should have access to everyone else’s
OKRs and current results. When different teams are
collaborating on a project, each team should have
OKRs that can be clearly communicated across
different groups, while quarterly reviews are also
essential to ensure that OKRs are followed upon.
But the ‘what’ and the ‘how’ isn’t the whole story
behind OKR. The ‘why’ is an essential component as
well. According to John Doerr, who introduced OKR
to Google and is considered the theory’s greatest
advocate, ‘truly transformational teams combine their
ambitions to their passions and their purpose.’ When
running a company that seeks to offer incentives
for embodying certain values, OKR can be used as a
means of instilling accountability and encouraging
teams to live up to their goals.
A team of 20 employees isn’t too small to start rolling
out OKRs. Once bosses bring new team members
on board with the OKR methodology, individual
employees and teams are can begin to build their own
OKRs and spread them throughout their company.
Companies can make OKR part of their routine,
for instance by going over objectives and values
at weekly kickoff meetings or by regularly talking
through company-wide annual OKRs at team briefings.
If you harness this methodology properly then you can
inspire and motivate a team of exceptional people to
achieve great things. You can keep creative energy
aligned towards a common goal, and you can lay the
foundation for a truly outstanding business.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 33 Submit
A recent study has shown that
22% of employees actually prefer
calling in sick than facing a
performance review.
But get this too…
The State of Employee
Engagement Report by OfficeVibe
says loud and clear that 82%
of employees really appreciate
receiving feedback – whether it is
inherently positive, or negative.
So, what do these two
contradicting facts tell us?
Feedback improves performance.
But the generic and prevalent
performance reviews or employee
evaluations of HR have little to do
with a true culture of feedback and
everything to do with making talent
feel threatened and uncomfortable.
Let Us Agree –
Performance Reviews Are
Broken
The best way to go about
identifying where the disconnect
lies is diving into modern
Employee Performance
Evaluation Modules
By Diana Korza
Don’t buy one without these 6 key features
productivity and performance
research that can layout the
best practices, and contrast the
current state of affairs to the
ideal scenario.
#1 Performance Reviews
Disregard the Part Played
by Trust
Trust may seem like an intangible,
unquantifiable parameter when it
comes to impacting something as
crucial as employee performance,
but do not underestimate the
value of trust as a part of your
workplace culture.
Leadership IQ surveyed 7000
executives, managers and
employees and it found that 32%
of talent stay or churn based
on the trust they have in their
managers and in the company.
Moreover, trust is an important
component of what the People
Operations at Google define as
“psychological safety” of a team.
The concept is simple. Employees
who trust that the management
and their managers have created
an ecosystem where they are free
to take risks and think outside
the box without the fear of being
ridiculed for failing, are not only
more receptive to feedback, they
also end up being up to 40% more
productive than their peers who
operate in an environment where
the management looms as a
threat to make them conform to
company policies.
Performance reviews the way
they are structured today leave
no room for trust building. They
happen once, or at the very most
twice, a year. The process feels
unnatural and alien. Often there
exists no informal communication
between those who are being
evaluated (the employees) and
those who are on the other side
of the table conducting the
evaluations (the managers).
The output is rendered useless,
except as a source of anxiety
for talent, because the trust
that would enable its faithful
assimilation is missing from
the mix.
Workers assume that the result of
the evaluation is an indictment of
their performance and go to great
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 34 Submit Your Articles
Employee Performance Evaluation Modules
lengths to avoid taking anything
that comes out of it to heart.
#2 Performance Reviews
Position Feedback
Subjectively (and
Negatively)
Performance reviews may actually
push top employees to quietly
leave your company!
Here is why.
74% of people who struggle at
work, already know that they are
facing issues. This prepares them
for a relatively negative evaluation
of their performance. But on the
other hand, those who like to
grow and learn are considerably
perturbed by critical feedback,
because they are unsuspecting
of any form of attack (even
imagined) on their track record.
This is reflected in Josh Bersin’s
study where he talks about
Microsoft completely disbanding
its performance management
process after discovering how
evaluations have lost them their
A-players.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 35 Submit Your Articles
There are a number of reasons
driving this phenomenon.
Performance reviews are
typically viewed as subjective.
The upward approach where only
the blinkered view point of distant
managers is relied on for an
assessment is dying a lingering
death. Diversity in insights and
opinions from multiple raters
is what paints a full circle or
complete picture of an individual’s
capacity and contributions. And
it is this type of rich feedback
that employees interested in
growing within an organization
actually seek.
Performance reviews push
managers towards the Central
Tendency Bias. Providing
honest feedback can be deeply
disconcerting. An easy way out
is to grade most employees an
average, with a smattering of high
performers and a few outliers
who need immediate attention to
improve their output. However, it
is proven that 69% of company
talent crave better recognition. It
is only when they are shown to be
exceptional do they call upon their
reservoirs of discretionary energy
and go above and beyond the call
of duty. In short, performance
reviews not done well encourage
disengagement and dissatisfaction at work.
#3 Performance
Evaluations are One-Sided
This again boils down
partly to trust. In traditional
performance evaluations, all the
communication is one-way, and
potentially coming from someone
(the managers) who have not had
the time to foster mutual trust and
respect with the employee.
Cue in the already discussed
problem of the exercise becoming
futile because the worker is
not receptive to the feedback
being shared.
But there is another opportunity
being squandered here.
Studies by Gallup have shown
that management can also
benefit directly from performance
evaluations. In fact, the managers
who are open to feedback from
employees and actively solicit them
during evaluations are perceived to
be better leaders, and they improve
their overall profitability by 8.9%.
Employee Performance Evaluation Modules
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 36 Submit Your Articles
#4 Performance
Evaluations Focus
on Efficiency, Not
Productivity
Efficiency and productivity
may seem like two sides of the
same coin, but in terms of what
they mean for a business, the
difference is significant. When
a company wants its workforce
to be efficient, it is basically
demanding “more in less time”.
More of what?
That is where productivity steps
in. It is not enough to have an
army of workers who know the
fastest way to wrap up tasks.
They must also master the
science of choosing the right
tasks, at the right time. Especially
since the global economy is now
one of knowledge workers.
Traditional performance
evaluations do nothing to
align results with goals that
are important to rendering the
purpose of a company. They fail
to match personal employee
motivations with the overarching
objective of the business, thereby
stifling accountability, the sense
of belonging, and loyalty.
Employee Performance
Evaluation Modules
& 6 Features to Mend
Performance Reviews
Strategy will obviously lead the
way if performance evaluations
are to find a place in the workforce
of tomorrow.
But tools can help to a large
extent by translating strategy into
action, and then automating these
actions for smooth execution.
If you are interested in fixing the
anomalies that traditional evals have
introduced in your company, then
find a performance review module
with these six key features:
360 Degree Continuous
Feedback
The term “360 degree” stands for
the fact that this type of feedback is
solicited from multiple stakeholders
within the company. Managers,
peers, those who are managed
– everyone gets to add to the
insights about the contributions
and competencies of an individual.
Exhaustive research has shown that
such evaluations are relied upon
as rich, helpful, transparent and are
more likely to affect positive changes
in the people receiving them.
The ideal software solution leads
with a customized approach where
Employee Performance Evaluation Modules
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 37 Submit Your Articles
some parameters can be gauged
on an objective numbers scale
(with the proper context), and
some parameters require
those who are conducting
the evaluation to share
subjective feedback.
Other factors to consider are the
frequency of assessment and
the ease of receiving feedback.
Performance evaluations are the
most effective when they are
conducted throughout the year
to account for random dips in
the productivity of employees, or
unforeseen events that can derail
work-life balance. Moreover,
individuals should be able to
proactively ask for feedback,
since this helps build confidence
in their abilities.
Easy One-on-One
Meetings
Performance evaluations lose
their grip on the psyche of
employees, if they are used to
interacting with their managers
in a one-on-one setting. These
informal meetings normalize the
giving and receiving of feedback
and go a very long way in creating
that “psychological safety” which
shapes excellent workers.
Ideally, managers should be
able to quickly and discreetly
book these meetings, with
an automatic overview of the
schedule of the team member.
Conversely, talent should also be
able to request a session without
jumping through hoops.
CakeHR’s performance module
even goes so far to give
supervisors the ability to add
meeting notes to the event,
choose a goal as the focus of
the discussion, and effortlessly
generate a PDF of the meeting
output for quick sharing.
Goal Setting
Objectives and Key Results
(OKRs) is by far the most effective
goal setting framework available
to businesses. It combines the
specificity and clarity of the
SMART goal setting paradigm,
with the freedom and flexibility of
cascading alignment.
Leadership identifies desired
improvements in areas that
matter. However, the process of
Employee Performance Evaluation Modules
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 38 Submit Your Articles
The ability to pull custom reports,
visualize how productivity pans
across teams, and spot gaps that
can be filled to optimize workforce
output are available to companies,
and too good to be passed up.
Giving performance reviews a new
lease on life, while respecting the
changing needs of the workforce
and the call for more stringent
privacy measures is a big ask.
But evaluation modules with
features like 360-degree
feedback, one-on-one meetings,
goal setting options, custom
engagement surveys, integrated
career planning and people
analytics are a step in the right
direction.
executing projects to bring about
these improvements is left to the
discretion of managers, and to a
large extent even the employees.
Workers are assigned individual
goals to measure performance in
their domains. But these goals all
tie back to the OKRs selected for
the quarter.
Performance evaluation modules
with the right goal setting options
allow the leadership to set OKRs
for the company, and assign
smaller, personalized goals to
workers who are then assessed
in their context through the
fair and objective channel of
360-degree feedback.
Engagement Surveys
Engagement surveys take
two-way communication to the
next level. Management can
put its finger on the pulse of
employee satisfaction, and even
encourage workers to share their
perception of the performance of
the leadership of the company, in
order to improve it.
Good performance evaluation
modules should provide the
option of anonymous feedback,
offer easy and visual aggregation
of employee sentiments,
support customization of survey
questions, and last but not
the least, be accessible from
mobile devices.
Career Planning &
Learning
Employees feel the most fulfilled
when they are confident that
their personal career goals will
be fulfilled as they work towards
realizing the mission of the
company. This is why career
planning, a well thought out
career path and custom learning
tracks are crucial in today’s
dynamic market.
● Skills are becoming obsolete at
a rapid pace. For example, the
half-life of a digital marketer’s
know-how is only 2.5 years.
This is why performance
evaluation modules need
to integrate learning tracks
that supplement existing
knowledge with suggestions of
new, relevant upgrades, as they
become available.
● The whole point of an
evaluation is to map the
strengths and weaknesses
of employees, strategically
capitalizing on the former,
while helping them mitigate
the latter. Through intuitive
and progressive career
planning, purportedly mediocre
performers can find their
“sweet spot” and generate
exceptional value for the
business.
People Analytics
According to a survey by Deloitte,
globally 70% of organizations
are in the midst of projects to
deploy people analytics solutions.
Businesses have woken up to
the truth that customers stand
for revenue, but employees are
by far their largest expense.
In the wake of employee
experience as a major trend to
focus on, people analytics in
performance evaluation modules
is non-negotiable.
Employee Performance Evaluation Modules
Would you like to comment?
Diana Korza is a sales representative
at HR software company CakeHR by
Sage, keeping a sharp eye on SaaS,
B2B, HR, and sales.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 39 Submit Your Articles
There are many performance
management tools available
to companies, but one that
remains in place is the employee
performance review. Most
organisations beginning to
Performance Reviews
vs Focal Reviews: The
How, Why & When
By Robyn South
Is one type of review better than
the other?
implement employee performance
reviews start off with the basic
annual review which often
falls in line with, or has some
connection to, the employee’s
commencement date.
However, performance reviews are
often criticised by management
for causing an interruption to the
workflow of their departments and
over time this ends up creating a
challenge to coordinate, especially
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 40 Submit Your Articles
for larger organisations, which all
too often leads to people slipping
through the net and performance
management problems don’t get
highlighted until later on.
“Only 5% Of HR Leaders
Are Satisfied With
Performance Reviews”
How Are Performance
Reviews Carried out
Against Focal Reviews?
Standard performance reviews
are often conducted annually and
in-line with an employee’s start
date, for example, 3 months, 6
months and 1 year. This means
that the review process is
sporadic across the entire year
due to the fact that people get
recruited at all different times and
there is usually, from personal
experience, a lot of chasing up
between HR and management to
stay on track. Managers using
this performance review type may
have a bit more leeway to delay
reviews as there is no immediate
pressure from HR to get it done
unless it has been flagged as
overdue.
This can cause tension between
HR and management and a
resistance to get performance
reviews develop over time which
causes dissatisfaction with part
of their role as a manager and
defeats the whole purpose of
the exercise.
A review method that is gaining
popularity is the focal review,
sometimes referred to as
common date or scheduled
reviews. Instead of conducting
reviews based on the anniversary
of an employee’s commencement
date, the focal review looks at
performing an entire departments
reviews at the same time.
Although this may sound daunting
to management of larger teams,
it does create motivation to get
completed on time as everyone is
aware of the date they are to be
submitted and HR tech options
are able to support the more
timely aspects of the process.
Disadvantages of the focal review
are that newer employees will still
have their performance formally
evaluated without a full year of
service behind them and other
tasks may need to be neglected
for a time whilst the reviews are
being completed.
Why Are Focal Reviews
Becoming More Popular vs
Performance Reviews?
To try and avoid downtime in
a department, organisations
consider the focal review to
reduce disruption throughout the
year. Although the focal process
requires some tight scheduling,
it leaves the remainder of the
year to just continue with regular
performance check-ins and
employees can actually focus
on the individual, departmental
and company-wide goals and
objectives.
HR can also spend more time on
using the data collated from the
reviews to develop and implement
performance boosting strategies
rather than chasing up paperwork,
and because tech can play a big
part in the smooth running of any
review process, the scheduling
and communication of mass
reviews within a short window of
time is made a lot easier with an
effective HR system.
With reviews being carried out
on the same date using the
focal method, organisations are
benefiting from the following:
● More regulated check-ins at an
organisational level to monitor
company objectives alongside
annual goals
● Better organised preparation if
everyone involved is aware of
the review date
● Better data insights for
strategic planning purposes
● All employees performance is
evaluated against the same
measures of success that
the company is focused on at
that time
● Provides a better overview of
an organisation at a certain
point in time
● Easier to operate and manage
as the process is carried out
within a small window of time
rather than spanning across
the entire year
● Greater cost control, especially
if reviews fall in-line with
annual salary increases
● On-time administration
creating less work from HR to
chase up outstanding reviews
● Can easily be aligned with
business goals and objectives
● Less chance of employee
reviews getting pushed to one
side or forgotten about
● Easier to assess data and
analytics of performance
Performance Reviews vs Focal Reviews: The How, Why & When
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 41 Submit Your Articles
across all departments and
can see performance of
organisation as a whole
When Is the Best Time
to Transition to a
Focal Review in Your
Organisation?
The process to transition from
a performance review to a focal
review isn’t always an easy
one and can require months of
preparation with heavy reliance on
HR tech, depending on the size of
the company and whether salaries
and bonuses need to be prorated
with the change of review date.
Successful implementation
requires a strong business case
which lays out and considers
the impact the review change
may have on the business and
its departments. The process
and timeline should be carefully
thought out to fall in line with
other significant dates in the
company calendar (such as
organisational goal deadlines,
budget reviews, tasks that
cannot be put to one side, etc.)
and communication needs to
be open between HR, Payroll
and Finance as part of the key
decision making process to
ensure that labour resources and
costs are accurately calculated
against budget.
The focal review doesn’t have
to be the only review type held
annually either. Semi-formal,
continuous, transparent feedback
should be made part of your
company’s performance review
strategy to ensure targets are
on course, skill-set shortages
and issues are identified and
addressed immediately and
expectations are being met.
Create Understanding
First
A big problem with any type of
performance review is not the
system, but the understanding
behind them. Performance
reviews are not always considered
as a beneficial performance
management tool which is why
there is a lot of resistance to get
them done and HR will hear a
million and one excuses as to
why they are an inconvenience
to the day to day running of a
department – and that’s what
needs to change.
So first things first, HR must
develop and communicate
the reasoning behind the
performance review process to
both management and employees
so that it is clear that they are
not just an opportunity to get a
telling off or part of a tick-box
exercise. Training managers
in best practice to deliver a
successful performance review
will motivate and enthuse staff to
work on issues with support and
be praised for great performance
and behaviour. Until this step
has been completed, no review
process, whether it be an annual
performance review or focal
review, will make a positive
difference to your business.
Both the performance review
and focal review appraisal
systems have clear pros and
cons and although there appear
to be more benefits to both the
employee and organisation when
implementing the focal review, it
really is dependant on the scale
and operations of the business
and the resources available by
means of staffing, budget and HR
systems.
Ultimately, companies need
to choose the review type that
best supports the needs and
productivity of the business.
Does your company use the focal
review method? And if so, we
would love to hear your opinions
on it!
Would you like to comment?
Robyn South is an HR professional
with over 7 years’ experience in
generalist and complex employee
relations matters. A newly established
Virtual HR Assistant offering a range
of HR services online, who loves
to travel and part of the content
management team at HR software
company CakeHR.
Performance Reviews vs Focal Reviews: The How, Why & When
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 42 Submit Your Articles
I
n these unprecedented times,
when most businesses are
immobilized, business leaders
face the challenge of becoming
disconnected from customers,
suppliers and employees
sequestered in their homes.
Market opportunities have frozen.
To survive, leaders must change
their way of thinking. Instead
of finding opportunities in what
were formally viable business
channels, they must investigate
new, unchartered territory. Their
employees can help.
Each individual staff member
represents a multidimensional
stockpile of expertise and
interests, which have been built
prior to or outside of their current
work. For example, the person
working as an IT consultant
may also have been a Marines
veteran with specialization in
intelligence and extensive social
capital across veteran-based
organizations. An employee
Mobilizing Edgy
Expertise In Times Of
Market Disruption
A step-by-step process to put the expertise of
your staff to work on pressing problems
By Julia Ivy
working in the procurement
department may have past
experience in the emerging
economy of constant disruptions.
Still another employee has raised
three home-schooled children
with regular online interactions.
Their current employer may not
have been aware of the broader
expertise they can bring.
Tapping into employees’ unused
qualifications could open up
innovative new practices that
could make a difference in
remaining afloat through this
time of crisis, or even new
opportunities for being relevant
and connected.
Use this step-by-step Make
Your Case process to put the
multidimensional expertise of
your staff to work on pressing
problems. It will give them a
chance to demonstrate their
professionalism and shape their
space within your transforming
organization or industry as they
wait for the “all clear” to return to
the office.
1. Describe the challenge
that needs a solution. Clearly
communicate the situation
the organization faces — the
circumstances that brought it
on and the hurdles it expects to
encounter. Frame the challenge
using the Five Ws: Who are
the decision makers, what the
challenge entails, wherein the
organization the challenge
originated, when it must be solved,
and why it must be resolved. Invite
staff to participate in a Make
Your Case exercise to provide
out-of-the-box ideas that offer
solutions.
2. Identify volunteers. Ask
staff members to specify their
experiences and capabilities
they can offer to solve the
challenge. Clarify that any
relevant capabilities are welcome,
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 43 Submit Your Articles
Mobilizing Edgy Expertise In Times Of Market Disruption
especially if employees have
experiences in dealing with similar
challenges in different settings.
Volunteers may self-organize into
groups or work individually. Invite
questions that will help clarify the
challenge and indicate available
resources. Connect them with
those who are currently working
on the challenge to entertain
diverse perspectives and ensure
everyone involved has a voice.
3. Standardize the process of
bridging ideas with realities. Ask
teams and individuals developing
a Make Your Case proposal to
summarize their understanding
of the challenge and its context
in a short document using a
specified structure. For example,
this might include: the challenge,
the challenge background, the
current situation, and the question
that needs to be answered. Title
the case with reference to the
challenge, such as: “Reconnecting
Socially While Staying Distant
Physically.” It’s important that
employees not skip this step and
rush into delivering new ideas
right away. While many are eager
to make a pitch to prove that
they’re ready to solve the problem,
they trigger an opposite reaction
— their ideas are rejected as not
grounded in veracity.
4. Be open-minded in estimating
the added value. Ask employees
to prepare a consulting report
that analyzes the company
challenge through the prism
of the information they collect
and the expertise they bring.
For instance, an employee with
experience in providing takeout
Would you like to comment?
Julia Ivy, Ph.D. Psych, Ph.D. Mgmt,
is a strategy and international
business executive professor and
faculty director at Northeastern
University. Her area of expertise is
in bridging strategy and psychology
in the concept of personal strategy.
In addition to her academic work,
she acts as an executive coach
for those facing the “What’s next?”
challenge. Her new book is Crafting
Your Edge for Today’s Job Market:
Using the BE-EDGE Method for
Consulting Cases and Capstone
Projects (Emerald Publishing, Oct. 7,
2019).
services might recommend
offering curb-side service where
people can pick up products while
remaining socially distant. The
mother who home-schooled her
children may recommend online
activities and develop productrelated surveys that would keep
customers engaged. The former
marine might suggest the most
effective way to share information
within the company. Ask them
to elaborate on the action steps
and determine whether they will
generate value for the company.
Assess how well the cases
address possible obstacles or
needed resources.
As the ideas come from other
contexts, they can add an edge
to the company’s competitiveness if leaders are open-minded
and willing to challenge
industry boundaries.
5. Provide feedback and a plan
to move forward. Always offer
feedback on each Make Your
Case proposal. Let the staff
know how much the company
leadership appreciates their
initiative and fresh ideas. If
the case challenge is adopted
in its entirety or in part, give
full credit where it’s due.
Together, determine the next
steps, timelines and roles. If
possible, encourage Make Your
Case authors to publish their
cases in case collections or
professional journals, or present
them at professional conferences,
which further earns them credit
and showcases your company.
Communicating openly regarding
the challenges the company
faces is an effective way to rally
employees to take action. They
are often grateful that company
leaders asked for their ideas
instead of keeping them in
the dark. The companies that
utilize this practice will benefit
from involved employees and
innovative ideas.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 44 Submit Your Articles
The Power of Habits
Although I like variety and change, I am also a big fan
of well-established habits. Part of my time is spent on
daily, weekly or annual habits.
Examples:
● Daily: meditating (with Headspace). A cold shower.
No meat. Seven hours sleep.
● Weekly: 3-4 times running, total at least 30K.
● Bi-weekly: Ajax home match (during the season).
● Annually: Certain runs (like the Posbankloop and
the Zevenheuvelenloop). A couple of weeks in the
sun during the winter.
Habits at Work
Habits can be powerful, also at work.
Some suggestions:
1. Lunch walk
Easy to do, good for your health. Go for a lunch walk
instead of eating a fat lunch. For those who work in or
near the Symphony building in Amsterdam Zuid I once
created an overview of 10 lunch walks (Symphony
Lunch Walks).
2. Inbox empty
I have hardly ever reached this goal, but still, I am
convinced this is a worthwhile practice. I once worked
with a CFO who really mastered this practice. He
looked at his inbox only a couple of times per day, and
then took immediate action. He either answered the
mail, delegated a task to one of his people, moved the
mail to the waste basket or stored it for later action.
Establishing
Workplace Habits
By Tom Haak
10 suggestions
The impression you got: this man is fast and very well
organised. A good image for a CFO.
3. Weekly stand-up
If you use an agile methodology like Scrum or not, a
weekly stand-up meeting with your team can develop
into a practice that is very much appreciated. Monday
morning, 8.30 weekly stand-up. 30 minutes with a
short update from your side (what are your priorities
for this week?), and asking people where they need
help this week. Good luck and off you go.
4. Walk around the office
If walking around the office once per day is not a
habit, it will look strange if you do it for the first time.
What is she doing here? Is something wrong? If you
do it daily, you and the people will get used to it. You
will find out it saves you a lot of time. Many short
questions can be asked during your daily round,
and you get a better idea of what is going on. This
practice is useful for everybody, not only leaders.
5. Clean Desk
One of my first jobs was in an organisation that
worked a lot for the military. Confidentiality was very
important. Clean desk was the rule, and if your desk
was not empty at the end of the day, disciplinary
measures would follow. I worked for six years in
this organisation, and this practice has always stuck
to me. “A clean desk shows a clean mind” was the
slogan, although others said, “A clean desk shows an
empty mind…”
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 45 Submit Your Articles
6. Daily compliment
A long time ago, I was involved in assessment centers
for accountants. One of the exercises was a role play,
where the participants had to meet with an unhappy
client. The client had a long list with issues, and the
assignment was to write a short follow up memo
after the meeting (“As this is the last meeting before
your holiday, please write a memo or memos for
your team, so that things can move on during your
holiday”). The client was unhappy about many things,
but she mentioned one thing positive: “Carl in your
team is fantastic, he is the only one who always helps
me immediately”. We did many assessments, but
no-one ever wrote a memo to Carl, passing on the
compliment. The negative issues got all the attention.
7. Leave your boss alone on Thursdays
From now on, leave your boss alone on Thursdays,
and maybe Tuesdays as well. She will appreciate this,
and it will develop into a habit that will help you to
develop your independence.
8. Read one work-related article per day
You want to read more but you can never find the
time. Reading one article per day or one chapter
of a book might help to move you in the right
direction. Early morning is a nice time to do this.
Mark interesting ideas. If you read electronically,
you can use Readwise to deepen your experience.
Use Instapaper to collect articles you want to
read later.
9. Connect to a new person
By circling around between the people you already
know and feel comfortable with, you might not get
enough new ideas and fresh insights. Meet some
new people, for example, the friends of your friends
or people your colleagues recommend. Once per
week or once per month meeting someone new must
be achievable.
10. Share one idea/thought/insight per day
Other people can benefit from your insights and
ideas. Sharing at least one post per day, for example
via LinkedIn, Slack or your internal media, can help
to establish your profile as a professional or even
thought leader.
Establishing Habits
Establishing new habits, or getting rid of old habits, is
not easy. There is loads of literature about this. The
very short summary: forget will power, but invest in
creating the conditions that will help you to establish
the new habits. Lunch walk: ask a colleague to
collect you three times per week for a walk. Giving
at least one compliment per day: put a reminder in
your calendar.
It also helps to build strings of routines, like: open
computer, go to task list to review daily tasks, give
someone a compliment, walk around the floor and
get a cup of coffee (or water), empty your inbox while
drinking your coffee and you are ready for the day.
Would you like to comment?
Tom Haak is the founder and director
of The HR Trend Institute. Prior to
founding the HR Trend Institute in
2014, Tom held senior HR positions in
companies as Arcadis, Aon, KPMG and
Philips. The HR Trend Institute detects,
follows and encourages smart and
creative use of trends in the field of
people and organizations, and also in
adjacent areas.
Establishing Workplace Habits
Forget will power, but invest
in creating the conditions that
will help you to establish the
new habits.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 46 Submit Your Articles
As the world finds itself rapidly adopting
virtual meetings, many people struggle while
attempting to translate the in-person experience to
an online format. Luckily, there are some tried and
true actions neophytes can take to have their online
gatherings running like clockwork. By following ten
strategies for surviving in the virtual world, a newbie
can perform like a pro in record time.
Strategy One: Know What You Want to
Accomplish
Just as it’s important to have a game plan for an
in-person meeting, it’s essential that you have a
goal for any online get-together. Are you informing,
gathering information, looking for opinion, making a
decision, or something else? If you don’t know, your
meeting is not going to feel as tight as it could, and
you won’t look as put together as you might had you
done some thinking in advance.
Once you know the goal, it should inform the
meeting’s length, number of attendees, and desired
level of interaction. For example, if you’re discussing
your company’s new telecommuting rules and
short-term business plans, you’re probably not
seeking opinion but instead providing information
and perhaps answering questions. Given the
one-way nature of the bulk of that gathering, you
can probably accommodate far more people than
you could if your goal were to elicit opinion and
seek input.
Connecting Through The
Camera And Keyboard
By Kate Zabriskie
10 success strategies for managing
meetings in the virtual world
Strategy Two: Communicate Your
Expectations
Most people will do what you ask them to do if you
ask them to do it and you model the behavior. Be
specific and direct. If you want people to share their
cameras, have a slide outlining your request as people
join the meeting. If you want them to raise their hands
to answer a question, raise your hand when you ask
it. If you want people to type something in the chat
box, you should type as they are typing. The more
deliberate you are in your instruction and actions, the
better your chances of seeing what you want to see.
Strategy Three: Share a Roadmap
Just as an in-person meeting can benefit from an
agenda, virtual meetings need a roadmap or itinerary.
Furthermore, in the virtual world it is helpful to show
the agenda several times during the meeting and
point out where you are on the schedule. An agenda
check refocuses people who may have drifted off and
it gives them an easy onramp back to the meeting.
Furthermore, acknowledging where you are in the
process gives people a sense of movement (or lack of
movement, for that matter) and helps the group stay
on task.
Strategy Four: Recognize Technology
Diversity
When it comes to technology, the virtual world is not
equal. In a typical meeting, some participants will
have equipment and bandwidth worthy of a Hollywood
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 47 Submit Your Articles
production, while others will appear to have a dial-up
line reminiscent of equipment from the previous
century. For that reason, it’s important to think
about what could go wrong and how to troubleshoot
potential problems before they occur. For example,
will you record and post the meeting for people who
have difficulty joining? Do you have a dial-in number
for those attendees who can’t get VoIP technology
to work correctly? Will you send slides in advance
for people who have difficulty logging in altogether
and must rely solely on a PDF? The more you prepare
for problems, the easier they are to deal with should
they arise.
Strategy Five: Arrive Early and Start on
Time
If at all possible, it’s a good idea to arrive at your
virtual meeting well in advance of your participants.
The time you have in the virtual room before it
fills will give you an opportunity to troubleshoot
your technology, get comfortable in your seat,
and welcome early birds as they enter the room.
Your early arrival also allows you to avoid having
participants wait in a lobby. In principle, the lobby is a
neat concept. In practice, it can work against you. If
participants arrive at a lobby, they will more than likely
work on other tasks as they wait for you, and you’ll
have to work harder to get the full attention they were
initially prepared to give you.
Strategy Six: Accept You Are in a
Competition for Attention
Nothing says multitasking opportunity like a
web-based meeting. Even the most effective presenter
competes with a participant’s inbox, other work,
and just about any activity that is potentially more
interesting. You will have to double or even triple
your efforts to keep virtual attendees involved.
Putting yourself on camera and asking participants
to appear on camera is only the first step. Next, you
have to think about ways to keep people’s eyes on
the screen or handout and their hands busy about
Connecting Through The Camera And Keyboard
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 48 Submit Your Articles
every two minutes. Two minutes? Yes! People want
to be engaged. If they don’t engage with you, they will
engage with something else.
Strategy Seven: Add Variety
The longer your meeting, the more important it is
for you to add variety. If you are taking a poll, for
example, consider conducting one using one that
uses fingers held up to screen, another that uses the
systems polling function, one that requires people
to stamp a shape on a Likert scale displayed on a
slide, and another that requires attendees to type a
number in the chat box. The idea is to avoid becoming
predicable. Slide, slide, poll; slide, slide, poll; slide,
slide poll equals BORING.
Strategy Eight: Balance Conversation
Just as people participate in in-person meetings at
various levels, the same thing will happen in the virtual
world. A good meeting facilitator will take action to
add balance. For instance, “I’m going to throw this
next question to the people I see in the second row
on my screen. That’s Jane, Josh, and Juan.” In that
example, nobody is individually put on the spot.
However, those three participants know that at least
one of them is on deck to speak next. In addition to
calling on a few people, you should also consider
directing people to different channels.
“If you would like to answer in the chat box, do that. If
you would prefer to open your microphone, go ahead.
If you would like to send a message just to me, send
a private chat.” The variety of avenues offered in
that example accommodate people who like to talk,
those who prefer to write, and others who are less
comfortable speaking up in public.
Strategy Nine: Consider Using a
Production Team
It takes time to master a virtual meeting program, and
even the pros can find it difficult to wear half a dozen
hats at once. If you are running a large meeting or
new to the process, consider assembling a team. For
example, designate someone to troubleshoot tech
problems for attendees, assign a chat monitor to bring
anything to your attention you don’t see right away,
and so forth.
Would you like to comment?
Kate Zabriskie is the president of
Business Training Works, Inc., a
Maryland-based talent development
firm. She and her team help businesses
establish customer service strategies
and train their people to live up to
what’s promised.
Strategy Ten: Limit Your Time and Use it
Wisely
No adult wants to sit for more than two hours at a
time, and this is especially true in the virtual world. If
you plan to move a six-hour meeting online and leave
the agenda essential as is, think again. For meetings
that are essentially information-sharing exercises,
consider limiting yourself to one-hour blocks. For
interactive conversations, as a rule of thumb, you
should be able to get away with two hours at a time.
Rarely, if ever, should you schedule more than four
hours a day. And those four hours should include a
generous break if possible. If you need more hours to
accomplish everything you need to, consider running
smaller meetings with fewer people, spreading a long
meeting over several days, or sharing video recordings
instead of bringing people together if they would
accomplish the same result.
It’s a new world for many people taking the plunge
into the world of virtual meetings, and now is the time
to get comfortable. Take the time now to leverage
a few simple strategies that will get you on solid
footing. Paying attention to what you like and don’t
that others do in their meetings will help you grow.
Asking for feedback from your attendees will further
accelerate the process. May your next online meeting
be a smashing success.
Connecting Through The Camera And Keyboard
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Publications
13 Targeted Publications
to Reach Your Audience
Informing, Educating, Enlightening and Assisting HR professionals
in their personal and professional development, the Excellence
series offers high-quality content through the publications! Leadership Excellence presented by HR.com DECEMBER 2019 1 Submit Your Articles
5 TENETS OF
LEADERSHIP
FOR 2020 AND
BEYOND
Building a more
collaborative, welcoming,
and mindful culture
– Arvin Patel
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol. 36 • No. 12
(ISSN 2562-0711)
08 14 22 29 Five Leadership Capabilities
Driving Business Success
– Elisa Friedman
Leaders, How Are You
‘Showing Up’ For Your Team?
– Anja van Beek
Managers, Do You Know How
Important The Quality Of Your
Leadership Is?
– Douglas Brown and Jacob Schneid
Earning Respect From Your
Team Members
– Hilary Jane Grosskopf
07 12 20 26 Tips For Training Remote
Teams, A Growing Workforce
– Tammy Bjelland
Retaining Millennial And Gen
Z Women
– Heidi Ganahl
Three Ways To Build Your
Business’ OKR Muscles
– Pedro Signorelli
How Objective Data Helps
Maximize Your Team
– Trevor J. Shylock
STRUGGLING WITH
AGENCY RETENTION?
Skip the ping pong tables, invest
in professional development
– Jessica Cortapasso
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol. 7 • No.12
WHEN ABSENCE
DOESN’T MAKE
THE HEART
GROW FONDER
Leave requests under
the ADA
– Janette Levey Frisch
5 Compliance Issues Every HR
12 20 28 35 Leader Should Know
– Rachel Sobel
Time Is Money
– Paul DeCamp
Pay Day, Every Day?
– Tyler Bernstein
Learn A Lesson
From Scrooge
– Wilson S. Jarrell
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol.06 • No.12
07 11 14 19 What You Don’t Know
About Pain Can Hurt You
– Wanda Swenson
Good Old Days?
– Jim Stovall
Are You Satisfied With
Who You Are At Work
And At Home?
– Lauren E Miller
Empathy In The
Workplace
– Lesley Lyons
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol. 24 • No. 12
EMOTIONS DRIVE
BEHAVIOR. DO
YOU REALLY
GET IT?
– Bill Benjamin
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol.07 • No.12
10 16 21 29 Strategies For Improving Mental
Health At The Workplace
– Dr. Teresa Bartlett
Top 5 Ways To Manage Stress In The
Workplace
– Jenny Watkins
Advantages Of Having A Health
Savings Account
– Jeff Strong
Identifying Generational
Priorities Is Essential To Benefits
Administration And Participation
– Lesley Lyons
HOW TO CREATE
A HEALTHY AND
TOBACCO-FREE
WORKPLACE
When your full-time people
quit tobacco, do gig workers
quit too?
– Jessie Saul
11 17 24 31 8 Reasons To Invest In A Gamified
LMS For Your Customer Service
Department
– Christopher Pappas
Artificial Intelligence:
Transforming The Corporate E
Learning Landscape
– Anubha Goel
How Education Should Prepare
Students For The Future
Of Work
– Maeve Miller
Tips For Training Remote
Teams, A Growing
Workforce
– Tammy Bjelland
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol.6 • No.12
WORKPLACE LEARNING
& TECHNOLOGY
TRENDS 2020
Big Data, learning analytics
and reporting
– Amit Gautam
11 21 28 34 The Ultimate Guide For Customer
Journey Optimization
– Brayn Wills
8 Reasons To Invest In A Gamified
LMS For Your Customer Service
Department
– Christopher Pappas
Leaders, How Are You ‘Showing
Up’ For Your Team?
– Anja Van Beek
10 Ways To Create An
Amazing Customer Service
Experience In 2020
– Shep Hyken
10 THINGS PRODUCT
MARKETERS
SHOULD DO IN THEIR
FIRST 100 DAYS
It’s very important to develop an
all-round and deep understanding
of the business
– Kirti Sharma
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol.18 • No.12
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol.06 • No.12
Employee Engagement
The State of Employee
Engagement in 2019
State of
the Industry
Research
Page 11 – 30
© 2019 Paychex, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
When most people think about payroll, words like
“accurate,” “timely,” and “weekly” or “biweekly” come
to mind, and as long as those needs are being met, we
rarely think about it much. But as disruptions happen
in many industries, and as the workforce continues to
evolve, payroll leaders, CEOs, and CFOs need to be
thinking about how they pay their people.
That’s why we put together “Payroll Innovation: Three
Workforce-Centered Trends that are Changing the
Payroll Landscape.” In this free eBook we discuss the
changing workforce and three payroll innovations that
are helping to meet the needs of these employees.
The Workforce is Evolving.
So Should Your Payroll.
Download this free eBook at:
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THE VALUE OF
ENGAGEMENT AND
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
If you want employee engagement,
you have to show that you care
– Colin Ellis
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol.6 • No.12
What Employers Can Learn From
10 16 21 27 Major League To Avoid Big League
Problems
– Curtis Moore and Travis Vance
New DOL Proposed Rule On
Fluctuating Work Week Is
A Keeper!
– Mark Tabakman
Determining The Status Of
Independent Contractors
– James Hays, Sean Kirby and Myles Moran
Fluctuating Laws: DOL
Announces Proposed
Fluctuating Workweek
Regulations
– Helen Holden
CELEBRATE THE
SEASON SAFELY
What can you do to avoid
liability from sexual
harassment, alcohol
consumption, and other
categories of risk?
– Rachel Sobel
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol.07 • No.12
DECEMBER 2019
www.hr.com | 877-472-6648
The 2019 State of
Artificial Intelligence,
Disruption and
Innovation
What does the ascent
of artificial intelligence,
machine learning and
robotics mean for HR?
State of
the Industry
Research
ASTOUND
Service Management. Reimagined.
Sponsored by
The 2019 State of Artificial
Intelligence, Disruption and
Innovation State of
the Industry
Research
Page 21 – 36
ASTOUND
Service Management. Reimagined.
THE STATE OF
ADOPTION OF AI
IN RECRUITING
As AI continues to operate
and grow in its recruiting
environments it becomes
more effective over time
– Ameya Deshmukh
Page 19-34
The 2019 State of Artificial
Intelligence, Disruption and
Innovation
Sponsored by
State of
the Industry
Research
HR AND
ARTIFICIAL
INTELLIGENCE –
ANSWERING THE
BIG QUESTIONS
TOGETHER
– Peter J. Scott
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol. 7 • No.12
ASTOUND
Service Management. Reimagined.
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol.06 • No.12
5 COMPLIANCE
ISSUES EVERY HR
LEADER SHOULD
KNOW
Not understanding
compliance obligations
is not a legal defense
– Rachel Sobel
11 19 24 32 Pay Day, Every Day?
– Tyler Bernstein
What Does The Pennsylvania’s
New Law On Minimum
Wage And Overtime Exemption
Regulations Mean?
– Adam R. Long
Are HR Spreadsheets Stunting
Business Growth?
– John Crowley
What If An Employee Is
Terminated Close To Receiving
Equity Compensation?
– Robert A. Fisher, James M. Hlawek and
Michael E. Steinberg
11 18 24 33 Gig Economy: Becoming
A Key Part Of India
Inc.’s Strategy
– Sanjay Lakhotia
The Network Leader:
Building Collaborative And
Successful Enterprises
– Raksha Sanjay Nag
Shattering The Illusion
Of Inclusion
– Ben Haack, Lauren Touré
and Denis Doolan
Artificial Intelligence Has
Come To Hiring
– Rajat Suneja
NOVEMBER 2019 • Vol.1 • No. 04
SMARTEN UP
PERFORMANCE
MANAGEMENT
IN YOUR
ORGANIZATION
A few strategies and tools to
help you
– Susan Leonard

10 16 23 31
The 2030 Workplace
– Marcus Mossberger
Are Performance Goals
Motivating Or Demoralizing
Your Employees?
– Tim Eisenhauer
Brexit: What Talent
Managers Must Know Now
– Jurga McClusky and Ian Robinson
Key Tips For Embracing
The OKR Philosophy
– Sam Fromson
TIPS FOR
MANAGING
PERFORMANCE
DURING THE
CORONAVIRUS
CRISIS
– Rachel Ernst
APRIL 2020 • Vol. 8 • No.04
12 5 Essential Tips For Working Remotely
Transform your work-from-home experience
– Tori Fica
20 Finding Tech Talent In Unexpected Places
What HR executives need to know to stay
competitive
– Desa Burton
26 Owning Employee Transformation: The
Important Role of HR
Podcast with guest Shrikant Pattahil on
disrupting your cradle-to-grave HR
strategy
– Dr. Patti Fletcher and Shrikant Pattahil
33 Employee Performance Evaluation Modules
Don’t buy one without these 6 key features
– Diana Korza
Articles
Tips For Managing
Performance During The
Coronavirus Crisis
Helping employees thrive in the
midst of uncertainty
– Rachel Ernst

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citizens, immigrants and visitors are
to move about the new international
barrier. The world was given a
hint on February 19, when the U.K.
government issued a statement on
its forthcoming revised immigration
policy. Within what some are calling
the ‘ambiguous’ brief, one change
is clear: the end of freedom of
movement. Read Jurga McClusky
and Ian Robinson’s article, Brexit:
What Talent Managers Must Know
Now, for answers to the frequently
asked questions that will help global
talent managers navigate these new
waters with confidence.
Apart from these articles, we
also have a few other informative
articles in this edition that focuses
on various aspects of talent
management. We hope you enjoy
reading all articles and look forward
to receiving your feedback.
Stay Safe!
EDITOR’S NOTE
The coronavirus has badly
affected our daily life. For the
workforce, the uncertainty over
remote working and job security has
caused an unwelcome and stressful
situation. Employee engagement,
performance and productivity have
dipped. How to help employees
thrive in the midst of such a crisis?
Not everyone can enjoy remote
working. It can lead to isolation
and loneliness, especially for those
extroverts. A recent survey by HBR
has found that two-thirds of remote
workers are not engaged and only
5% see themselves working at their
company long-term. While these
numbers reflect full-time remote
employees, they give us insights
into the importance of creating
the positive working environment
you typically have in the office
while employees are remote. Read
Rachel Ernst’s article, Tips For
Managing Performance During The
Coronavirus Crisis, to know how
to build a solid foundation to align
on key priorities, stay connected,
and build healthy behaviors during
this time.
In these unprecedented times,
when most businesses are
immobilized, business leaders
face the challenge of becoming
disconnected from customers,
suppliers and employees
sequestered in their homes. Market
opportunities have frozen. To
survive, leaders must change their
way of thinking. Instead of finding
opportunities in what were formally
viable business channels, they
must investigate new, unchartered
territory. Their employees can
help. Julia Ivy’s article, Mobilizing
Edgy Expertise In Times Of
Market Disruption, discusses the
step-by-step process of doing
it right.
Workplace stability has given way
to a wide variety of options about
where we work, when we work, how
we work, and with whom we work.
In the next decade, we’ll continue to
see technology fueling the power
to be selective about our work
lives. Read Marcus Mossberger’s
article, The 2030 Workplace, for
more insights.
On January 31, 2020, the U.K.
officially cut ties with the European
Union, but didn’t clarify how U.K.
Babitha Balakrishnan
Editor, Talent Management
Excellence
Debbie Mcgrath
Publisher, HR.com
Editorial Purpose: Our mission is to promote personal and professional development based on
constructive values, sound ethics, and timeless principles.
Copyright © 2020 HR.com. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form
without written permission from the publisher. Quotations must be credited.
Talent Management Excellence
Publishing:
Babitha Balakrishnan – Editor
Chinnamani – Design and Layout
Chandra Shekar – Magazine (website
version)
Excellence Publications:
Debbie McGrath – CEO, HR.com – Publisher
Brad Sutton – VP of Sales
Sue Kelley – Director (Marketing, Email, Featured Research)
Babitha Balakrishnan and Deepa Damodaran `
– Excellence Publications Managers and Editors
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Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 6 Submit Your Articles
Coronavirus is top of mind for company leaders,
managers, and employees. Many employees
are working remotely as a safety precaution. Now,
HR teams are asking us: how do we drive employee
performance during this time of uncertainty?
Not only is the barrage of bad news unsettling to
employees, but working remotely can feel isolated
and lonely, particularly for those extroverts. HBR
found that two-thirds of remote workers are not
engaged and only 5% see themselves working at their
company long-term. While these numbers reflect
full-time remote employees, they give us insights
into the importance of creating the positive working
environment you typically have in the office while
employees are remote.
Based on Reflektive’s best practices and insights from
HR experts, we’ve crafted recommendations to boost
employee success and help them thrive in the midst
of uncertainty. Whether you’re part of an HR team, a
manager, or an employee, these tips and tricks aim
to build a solid foundation to align on key priorities,
stay connected, and build healthy behaviors during
this time.
For HR Teams
Take a pulse on employee sentiment. Now is an
ideal time to send a quick engagement survey to all
Tips For Managing
Performance During The
Coronavirus Crisis
By Rachel Ernst
Helping employees thrive in the
midst of uncertainty
COVER ARTICLE
employees. We recommend questions on current
employee sentiment, and how employees feel about
the changes that your company made during the
coronavirus pandemic. Some questions you may want
to ask:
● I feel that employee needs were addressed by my
company during this time
● I have the resources I need to do my job well during
this time
● I know who to talk to if I have questions and
concerns during this time
● I feel confident in my company’s ability to handle
the impact of the coronavirus going forward
● I receive a good cadence of updates about what
my company is doing to address the situation
Remember to include a comments section for every
question — this enables you to gather more nuanced
information from employees. For more best practices
on using surveys to boost engagement, check out
some great Reflektive resources.
Have the right tools in place to boost remote
collaboration. Ensure that all employees have access
to email, a messaging platform such as Slack or
Microsoft Teams, and a video tool to communicate
effectively while working remotely. Ideally, employees
can provide recognition and plan for 1:1s on these
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 7 Submit Your Articles
platforms too. Team syncs, 1:1s, and all-hands
meetings should ideally take place over the video
to foster connection and enable employees to read
body language.
Establish norms for working remotely. By setting
guidelines early on, employees are more likely to
stay connected and productive during this time. We
recommend the following remote work best practices
for all employees:
● Adhere to expected daily working hours to
drive consistency
● Use project planning tools such as Wrike or Asana
to clearly define and communicate roles, responsibilities, and timelines
● Ask peers how they like to communicate, such as
their preferred channels, level of detail, and level
of informality
● Instill your workplace culture by celebrating
work anniversaries, business milestones, and
other accomplishments
Be a resource for your managers. Regularly check in
with managers to see how they are doing, and if they
need additional support or resources to manage their
teams remotely. We recommend biweekly manager
meetings to share best practices on driving employee
accountability, engagement and performance while
they’re remote.
For Managers
To the HR team, we recommend that you share recommendations with managers – ideally in a recurring
manager meeting – for further discussion and
reinforcement! Here’s a start:
Proactively check on employee stress. Fear and
anxiety are common reactions to this global pandemic.
Office and school closures can impact employees’
daily work environment. News and conversation
create more cause for concern among some of your
employees. By addressing employee stress early on,
you can help to alleviate it and accelerate the return to
normalcy. Some tips include:
● Sharing helpful resources to manage stress, such
as this NPR article and these CDC recommendations
● Asking what accommodations you can make to
alleviate stress
● Reminding employees that they can use sick leave
when they need it
● Encouraging employees to leverage the wellness
programs that your company offers
● Recommending walks and other activities that are
good for the mind and body
Keep your team connected. Fostering inclusivity,
visibility and engagement are very important for your
remote employees. Here are some ways you can
maintain team connectivity:
● Add 2-3 team virtual standups each week to
provide support, alignment and visibility for your
team. Use video, chat or the phone to help people
check-in on what they accomplished and what’s
new they’re working on.
● Create a virtual “watercooler” space: Ask
employees to increase their engagement on Slack
or MS Teams. Have employees hold peer 1:1s
or virtual coffee breaks to maintain socialization
and human interaction. Suggest some of these
ice-breaker questions to get them started:
● What did you have for breakfast this morning?
● Do you have any pets?
● What is your work from home
morning routine?
● What is your favorite thing to do on a Saturday
afternoon?
● Always having your camera on
● Staying muted when you’re not talking
● Rotating meeting facilitators to keep everyone
involved and visible
Tips For Managing Performance During The Coronavirus Crisis
● Set expectations for conference calls: Establish
communication norms, such as:
● Celebrate & recognize! Birthdays and
workversaries should continue to be celebrated,
and hard work and wins should be recognized,
now more than ever! Use Slack / MS Teams or
other chat channels, email and your Reflektive
Recognition Wall to make those exciting moments
visible to everyone.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 8 Submit Your Articles
● Have fun! Get creative with how to engage
your team. For example: ask everyone to pick
a Slack emoji that best represents them, or
have a song competition for the song title that
best summarizes your team (e.g., “Takin’ Care
of Business”).
Stick with your regular 1:1s. Communication and
transparency don’t come as naturally when we’re
working remotely, so they need to be prioritized. 1:1s
with your employees are extremely important for
creating alignment, setting expectations, and making
your employees feel heard and valued. If you have
time to meet more than once per week with your
employees, even if just for a quick 10-minute sync, we
recommend you do so. More best practices on 1:1s
are available in Reflektive’s Ultimate Guide to 1:1s.
Over-communicate and recognize the wins! No
longer can you simply share “good job” at the end
of a meeting as you’re exiting the conference room.
Instead, find ways to share praise publicly with
your company’s recognition tool. We recommend
increasing your feedback during this time, and
encouraging the behaviors you want and need.
Recognize exemplary remote collaboration, cheer
small projects, and appreciate adjustments your
team is making in their everyday work schedules.
This positive reinforcement delivered early and
regularly should help keep your team engaged and
motivated. Check out some recognition best practices
from Reflektive.
Clarify (or simply reinforce) goals and priorities.
Working on one’s own means that each direct report
will need to be good at self-management. For this to
work, each person will need to know what success
looks like for their projects, and accountability should
be created via regularly-scheduled check ins. We
recommend creating your own template that direct
reports can fill in, and aligning on expectations at the
beginning and end of every project. In some cases,
now may be a good time to step back and see if your
employees’ goals still make sense. For instance, if
one of your Customer Success Managers set a goal
to “Visit 4 customers per quarter”, he may decide to
change his goal to: “Improve implementation project
plans and share with all customers.” Set new goals
with your employee, and comment on the revised
goals to track progress. Some other great goals best
practices during the coronavirus are available in this
HBR article.
For Employees
Share the below strategies with all employees to
help them acclimate and succeed while they’re
working remotely.
Ask for feedback, often. Remember that you’re still
working on important initiatives for your company,
even while you’re remote. In fact, you may be learning
new skills and driving new projects during this time
of change. Now more than ever, we recommend that
you request feedback from your manager, peers, and
cross-functional stakeholders. The best times to ask
for this feedback are after major project milestones,
or when you complete projects. These insights will
help you learn and improve your performance in future
projects.
Use technology to feel more connected. We
recommend using video when you can — it also
helps you observe your coworkers’ body language
and better read cues! On your first video meetings as
a newly remote employee, we recommend that you
share your workspace. Introduce your peers to your
kids and pets too! Some other best practices include:
● Overcommunicate with Slack/ MSTeams and
email. When people are remote, it’s easier for
messages to get lost. Helpful tip: at the start
of the workday, share what you did yesterday
and what you are going to do that day. Another
great tip: share in channels rather than direct
message individuals so everyone can benefit from
the conversation
● Document everything and make it easily shareable
– so your peers can easily get caught up on your
projects
Revisit your work goals. Take a look at your current
goals, and determine if they still make sense given
the changes at your company. Perhaps there are
other projects that you’ve been postponing, but would
Tips For Managing Performance During The Coronavirus Crisis
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 9 Submit Your Articles
add value to your peers, managers, or customers.
We also recommend using this time to invest in your
career by developing new skills or taking on different
projects. Your company is looking for employees to
be successful in this time of transition. Proving you
can thrive under stress builds your personal brand and
leadership’s confidence in your growth.
Dress for success. “If you look the part, you’ll feel the
part” says our Chief Sales Officer, David Laszewski.
Dress as if you’re going into the office, to stay in a
work mindset during working hours.
Get some fresh air! It’s finally springtime — take
advantage of it. Make time in your calendar to take
a walk and get some exercise. Some other wellness
recommendations when working from home are:
● Stay attuned to your mental health. Ask your
manager or HR representative about the resources
and programs available for employees to stay well
during this time.
● Be present. While it is important to see what’s
happening in the world, you don’t need to check
your phone or turn on the news every few minutes.
When you’re engaged in an activity or talking to a
family member, stay in the moment — and enjoy it!
● Stick to your regular schedule to help you feel
normalcy during this uncertain time. Take a shower
in the morning and get ready to start the day just
as you would to go into the office.
● Use technology to keep in touch with your family
and friends too!
If you’re interested in learning more about how to
boost performance for your newly remote workforce,
contact us here.
Would you like to comment?
Rachel Ernst is the VP of Employee
Success at Reflektive, a leading
performance management platform.
Tips For Managing Performance During The Coronavirus Crisis
Click here for a high-resolution Infographic
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 10 Submit Your Articles
The average person chalks up 90,000 hours at
work before they retire. Put into perspective,
that’s a third of our lives; work is our number one
activity after sleeping. Considering how much of our
lives we devote to it, it’s no wonder we expect our
work environments to reflect changing personal and
cultural priorities.
By 2030, the U.S. workforce will be dominated by
Millennials and Generation Z, about 136 million
individuals who prioritize work-life balance and
demand greater choice and control at work than
any generation before them. The most recent
Mercer Global Talent Trends study showed 54% of
respondents saying prioritizing work-life balance is
one of the top five things their company can do to
help them thrive. The cultural tide is turning, and the
employers that will attract the best and brightest of
the 2030 workforce are already adapting. They know
that technology will play a starring role when striking
The 2030 Workplace
By Marcus Mossberger
Balancing choice and control
the right balance between choice and control for
their employees.
A study by Mars Drinks reviewed the attitudes of
4,000 workers across North America and found that
participants who report they “have control over the
things that are important to me” were also highly likely
to have a sense of well-being at work. A sense of
control also correlated with better performance, with
these workers 57% more likely to be engaged, 55%
more likely to be collaborative, and 53% more likely to
be productive than those lacking a sense of control.
As the baby boomer generation continues its exodus
from the workforce, there are fewer workers who
remember that once-upon-a-time workers spent the
majority of their career with just one employer. This
notion of lifetime employment is not only a relic of the
past, it has less appeal than ever before, especially
for millennials who embrace not only changing
employers, but also careers.
FEATURE
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This is partly a reflection of the times we live in; the
pace and degree of change driven by technological
advancements, evolving social norms, and disruptive
business models, have nurtured change agility in
younger generations. The nature of work is also
increasingly temporary and project-based, enabling
workers’ desire for more choice. The time is right for
employers to reimagine the workplace.
Support for greater employee choice and control
is now frequently happening before the employee
has even signed a contract. When a job candidate
reaches the offer stage, more organizations are using
a “choose your own adventure” format to determine
work arrangements that were previously rigid and
austere. Some members of younger generations
are coming to work with expectations such as being
able to work four days a week, with two of them from
home. In other cases, employers are even allowing
new employees to choose their project and their
manager.
There can be more troubling outcomes from
flexible scheduling. Erratic and uncontrollable work
schedules pose a significant risk to lower-income,
part-time workers, especially as more people adopt
the practice of working multiple jobs at the same
time. Considering that Generation Z will be the first
workforce that can’t remember a world without
smartphones, organizations should consider how
mobile technology can help feel workers feel more
in control. For example, mobile scheduling apps can
let employees select their own schedule or swap
shifts with a colleague. The same can be said for
professional development and training. According
to The Center for Generational Kinetics, 85% of
Generation Z watched at least one video online
in the past week to learn a new skill, a trend that
future-looking organizations should consider when
onboarding and upskilling workers.
The 2030 workforce is also likely to see new attitudes
towards compensation and payment. According to
Doug Politi, President of Compliance Solutions at ADP,
“The way millennials are interacting with tech and
money, the expectation of immediacy will ultimately
change the way we get paid.” Some organizations are
exploring the idea of giving people options related to
how and when they are paid. Wal-Mart, the biggest
employer in the U.S., is utilizing an app called Even to
provide employees with instant access to their wages,
and we might predict similar technologies will be
rolled out to more organizations as workforce demand
for choice continues to increase.
This could also translate into employee demand to
“pick your perks.” For instance, if you are comfortable
with the risk, you may decide to take the bulk of your
compensation in the form of stock options, potentially
double a traditional salary. Or if you’re risk-averse you
may choose the lower salary paired with a Cadillac
benefit plan that will ensure complete coverage of
your health-related needs. Approximately 32% of
payroll is now spent on benefits (a 19% increase
in the last eight years) and the wellbeing market
is growing (currently estimated to be a $46 billion
industry) so we are likely to see more options and
flexibility as we move toward 2030. In addition, the
2030s could see artificial intelligence (AI) platforms
introduced to organizations to help employees pick
the right benefits for them. Employees could chat with
AI-powered virtual assistants about their personal
lifestyles, goals, and requirements and receive
tailored, data-driven advice on their benefits plans.
Workplace stability has given way to a wide variety
of options about where we work, when we work,
how we work, and with whom we work. In the next
decade, we’ll continue to see technology fueling the
power to be selective about our work lives. A gold
watch in return for forty years of loyal service may
not be available to the next generation, but a newly
empowering structure of work may prove to be much
more valuable in the long run.
The 2030 Workplace
Would you like to comment?
Marcus Mossberger is Senior Director,
Industry and Solution Strategy at Infor.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 12 Submit Your Articles
Some people are work-from-home champions.
For them, working from home means fewer
distractions, more flexibility, and greater productivity.
They have the perfect home-office setup, they stick
to a careful routine, and they crank out high-quality
work day in and day out. But not everyone falls into
this category. For some, remote work can be quite
a challenge, full of countless distractions, grueling
hours, and high stress.
If you are in this second category, don’t worry—you
aren’t alone, especially as so many employees are
now being asked to work from home for the first
time. We’ve put together this guide with the five most
important tips for working remotely to help you do
great work no matter where you are.
#1 Overcommunicate
When team members and managers can’t see
each other sitting at their desks hard at work, it’s
dangerously easy to assume the worst: “Why didn’t
they answer my chat message?” “Are they even
5 Essential Tips For
Working Remotely
By Tori Fica
Transform your work-from-home experience
working right now?” “Working from home doesn’t
mean vacation time.”
Trust is imperative for remote teams to work well
together, and without proper communication, that
trust breaks down. Here’s how you can keep up
effective communication while working remotely:
● Set a regular time to check in on chat in the
morning or throughout the day.
● Don’t hesitate to schedule a video call (cameras
on) to discuss things when email and chat don’t
cut it.
● Consider scheduling video check-ins that aren’t
focused on work. These social meetups can help
you stay connected and feel supported.
● If you need to step away from your computer now
and then (which we all do), drop a note in your
team chat to let them know you’re taking a break
and when you’ll be back online. A quick sign-off at
lunch and the end of the day is a good idea, too.
● If you need some help or support to be more
effective, let your manager know. On that same
note, reach out to your teammates to see if there’s
any way you can help them while remote.
One of the best quotes about communication is from
writer George Bernard Shaw: “The single biggest
problem in communication is the illusion that it has
taken place.” When working from home, it’s easy for
people to withdraw into their own silos and assume
everyone is on the same page—only to discover that’s
not the case at all. Both employees and managers
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 13 Submit Your Articles
can help their teams (and themselves) become
better remote workers by communicating early and
often. Create a great company culture even with
remote employees.
#2 Develop a Routine
When you work from home, your commute time
shrinks to zero, your housemates become your
officemates, and your breakroom is your kitchen.
Because of the convenience of working from home,
it’s tempting to slide out of your normal routine and
stop waking up early or changing out of your pajamas.
Don’t give in!
You may not be able to stick to your old routine
exactly as it was, but you should still structure
your day. Here’s how you can do that while working
from home:
● Wake up on time, giving yourself enough time to
get ready in the morning before the workday starts.
● You don’t have to put on a blouse or tie, but do
the basics to get ready for the day ahead, like
showering, brushing your teeth, and getting
dressed. You may even want to put on shoes to
help get into the mentality of going to work.
● Start the workday by deciding what you want to
focus on that day. You can use a traditional to-do
list or something more sophisticated like project
management software.
● Organize your calendar so it includes all your
meetings and appointments. You can block
out time for focused work as well as breaktime
activities like walking your dog or doing
the laundry.
● You don’t have to map out every minute of every
day to be an effective remote worker, but it helps
to establish a clear, consistent routine. Not only
can this make you more productive, but it also
helps those living with you (like kids and significant
others) know when you’re available and when they
need to let you focus.
#3 Take Care of Yourself
While you’re working from home, especially in
emergency situations like a pandemic, you may feel
pressure to squeeze every ounce of productivity out
of your day. And many of us measure our productivity
by how many tasks we check off our to-do lists. When
things are left undone at the end of the day, we feel
guilty, like we should be doing more.
That may not be the best approach, particularly if
you’re still transitioning to remote work and settling
into a new way of doing things. Often, slowing down
and taking time for yourself are the keys to unlocking
greater productivity. Here are some self-care tips for
working remotely:
● Schedule regular breaks to stand, move around, get
away from your computer, or eat a meal. Breaks
can help you recharge and refocus, making you
more effective in your work.
● Exercise and get outside regularly. Even a simple
walk around the block can do wonders for your
health both physically and mentally.
● Practice mindfulness to lower stress and build your
focus. This can be especially helpful in turbulent
times while you’re adjusting to new circumstances
like working remotely.
● Be patient with yourself as you transition to
working from home. Instead of focusing on how
much you accomplish each day, ask yourself how
you contributed. Not everything of value ends up
on a to-do list.
● Set a cut-off time at the end of the day when you
disconnect and “go home.” This is important for
maintaining a healthy work-life balance as you
work remotely.
Doing the basics to take care of yourself will make
you a healthier, happier, and more effective worker
whether you’re in an office or at home. Not only will
you be more productive, but you’ll also avoid burning
out over time despite the stress and other challenges.
#4 Create the Right Environment
If you’ve never worked from home before, or if you
only do it occasionally, you probably don’t have an
ideal home-office setup. Maybe your “home office” is
actually the kitchen table or a desk in your unfinished
basement. When you don’t have a proper workspace,
5 Essential Tips For Working Remotely
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 14 Submit Your Articles
5 Essential Tips For Working Remotely
it can be tricky to focus on your work. Here are some
strategies for creating the best home-office setup for
productivity without remodeling the house:
● Designate a workspace for yourself, however
small, where only work takes place. It can be one
side of the kitchen table, or a lap desk and the
sofa. The important thing is to set clear boundaries
for yourself and others: When you’re there,
you’re working.
● Communicate with others in your home to let them
know you need focus time. You could even set up
a sign to indicate when you’re working and when
you’re taking a break.
● Make sure your space is clean with minimal
distractions. The last thing you need while trying
to focus on work is a constant reminder of
housework that needs to be done.
● Schedule uninterrupted focus time. Eliminating
distractions from your home environment won’t
do much good if your email, chat, and phone
notifications won’t leave you alone. Set aside time
to put everything on mute (informing your team
first, of course) and work without interruptions.
If you have the budget and space, it’s certainly worth
investing in a more permanent home office. However,
even without an immaculate home office, you can be
productive and focused while working remotely if you
set the right boundaries.
#5 Use the Right Tools
The previous tips for creating the right environment
become even easier if you have the right tools for
working remotely. There are numerous resources,
both online and offline, you can use to set yourself up
for success while working at home, but these are a
few of our favorites:
● Get noise-canceling headphones to help you shut
out distractions and concentrate, especially if you
find yourself trying to work while your children or
roommates are home.
● Use a standing desk or standing desk converter
to get your blood flowing and relieve the strain of
sitting all day.
● A comfortable chair can make or break your
work-from-home experience. If you’re limited on
budget or space, a seat cushion and back pad can
also help.
● Try an egg timer to help you focus for stretches of
time. You can also use a timer on your computer or
phone if it won’t be too distracting.
These are just a few tools you can use at home to
help work effectively, but there are plenty more online.
And at an organizational level, your company can
invest in additional tools like a chat platform or project
management software to keep everyone connected
while working remotely.
Conclusion
Learning to work from home effectively is tricky for
anyone, let alone employees who have been asked
to do so suddenly and unexpectedly. If you’re feeling
overwhelmed by the unique challenges of remote
work, cut yourself some slack. You don’t have to
perfect these five areas right away. Instead, focus on
what you can do today to improve step by step while
working from home. Wake up 30 minutes earlier and
go on a walk. Make a list of priorities at the start of
your day. Choose one thing to buy to improve your
home workspace.
As you take it one day at a time and use the tips in
this guide, you can transform your work-from-home
experience. Whether you’re working remotely for only
a few weeks or for the rest of your career, you’ll be
able to do your best.
Would you like to comment?
Tori Fica is a Senior Copywriter for
BambooHR. Through research, analysis,
and writing, she creates content to help
HR professionals think and plan more
strategically. Her focus is on taking
complex ideas and in-depth research
and turning them into clear, digestible
pieces of content.

Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 16 Submit Your Articles
I
n the last post, we heard from a
Logistics Flow Analyst who was
losing her motivation to meet a
deadline after a deadline. I agreed
that constant deadlines suck and
that she had the right to feel the
way she was feeling.
What about performance goals?
Do they help employees focus
and deliver superior results? Or
do they add pressure and subtract
motivation? Do they give meaning
to our work or take it away?
If you know me or if you’ve
read Who the Hell Wants to Work
for You? Chapter 4, Set Goals, then
you know I am a big fan of goals. It
may even be the main reason I own
a business. A business is a moving
target, and I love chasing it.
Of course, I can’t do it alone. My
partner Vivek and I rely on every
Are Performance
Goals Motivating Or
Demoralizing Your
Employees?
By Tim Eisenhauer
If you leave your employees with no room to fail,
you cannot expect them to learn and grow
one of our employees to play the
game with us. It has to be the
same game. The same end goals
divided up according to each
employee’s job and skills. We want
them to feel the ownership over
their part of the collective goal.
But if there’s one thing we want to
avoid, it’s pressure.
In sports, pressure is something
you want your opponents to feel.
Not your teammates. Tactics like
“full-court pressure” or “pressure
on the quarterback” are directed
against the other team. The
goal is to get them to crack, lose
their concentration, and make
stupid mistakes.
Hardly something you wish for the
people you manage, yet there’s
a belief that bullying people into
accepting a “stretch goal” will
somehow get you closer to it.
I’ve heard this especially from
managers of public companies
who live and die by their
quarterly numbers.
The goals come all the way
from the top, and the managers
feel they have no choice but to
pass them down the chain of
command. Once the pressure
has reached the rank-and-file,
where can it go next? Of course!
The customers.
Do the words “channel stuffing”
mean anything to you? They come
from the manufacturing sector
and refer to a practice of forcing
distributors to accept product
shipments for which there’s no
demand. Channel stuffing creates
the illusion of moving inventories,
and, with some creative
accounting, can mimic sales.
FEATURE
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 17 Submit Your Articles
Are Performance Goals Motivating Or Demoralizing Your Employees?
Accounting is the last stop for
the corporate pressure-cooker.
When nothing else gives, there’s
always cooking the books.
Creative accounting aims to shift
the pressure from the company to
investors. When there’s too much
pressure on the investors, the
stock price falls, and the pressure
comes back full-circle to the
top management.
If the manager keeps pushing the
pressure down the line, eventually
it will backfire. We all know
what comes next: bankruptcies,
resignations, lawsuits, even
suicides. And if the story goes
public, we learn the names of the
guilty parties. We learn about their
families. We learn too much.
But we don’t always realize
that we are walking the same
slippery slope.
Corporate scandals have become
almost as commonplace as
corporate pressure. Every year
“another one bites the dust.” In
2016 we saw a handful of surprise
resignations, but nothing like the
media circus and political fanfare
surrounding Wells Fargo Chairman
and CEO John Stumpf.
Stumpf retired abruptly in October,
forfeiting his 2016 bonus and
$41 million in unvested shares.
Earlier that year, investment
research firm Morningstar had
named him CEO of the Year.
And in 2013, Fortune magazine
readers picked him as their
Businessperson of the Year. Wall
Street regularly praised Stumpf for
his company’s earnings and stock
performance. Until recently, Wells
Fargo was the only major bank
to have regained its market cap
since the 2008 financial crisis.
The reason for his fall from grace
was the massive fraud Wells
Fargo employees perpetrated
under his command. Between
2011 and 2016, retail banking
employees opened over 1.5
million deposit accounts and
issued over 500,000 credit
card applications on behalf of
customers who never asked for
or knew about it. The employees
also transferred money from the
customers’ legitimate accounts
into the phony ones, causing
overdraft and insufficient-funds
fees. Wells Fargo charged
$2.6 million in fees related to
unauthorized accounts.
In 2013, the LA Times got hold of
several Wells Fargo customers
and former employees who filed
lawsuits against the company.
The complaints dated all the way
back to 2009. In December 2013,
the newspaper ran the story by E.
Scott Reckard under the headline,
“Wells Fargo’s pressure-cooker
sales culture comes at a cost.»
The article caught the attention
of the City of Los Angeles and
federal regulators. On September
8, 2016, the regulators fined Wells
Fargo $185 million. John Stumpf
was called to testify in front of
the Senate Banking Committee,
and the calls for his resignation
poured in.
In hindsight, everyone, including
Stumpf, agreed that insane
pressure to meet sales targets
pushed employees over the edge.
Stumpf became CEO in 2007, and
in 2008, Wells Fargo acquired
insolvent Wachovia Bank. Stumpf
saw aggressive cross-selling as
his chance to create growth in
the distressed financial sector.
“Eight is great” became his call to
action, pushing employees to sell
every customer into eight Wells
Fargo products.
This is how one Wachovia branch
employee from Allentown,
Pennsylvania remembers it:
“Wells Fargo doubled our goals
and decreased our performance
pay. Every year the goals went up
more and more. Everyone was on
anti-anxiety medication.” 1
At the time of the LA
Times investigation, management
held branch employees to a
minimum of four products
per customer for 80% of the
customers, with the stretch goal
of eight products per household.
Regional bosses passed down
daily quotas for new accounts and
cross-selling. Branch managers
had to commit to 120% of the
quotas and report the results at
the end of each day.
The reporting took place during
a region-wide conference call.
The managers who came
up short were humiliated in
front of sixty of their peers.
Anticipating the nightly drills and
worse, branch managers took
desperate measures:
“If we didn’t hit our numbers,
branch managers would make us
stay after work for an hour, with
no pay, to cold call customers
and try to sell accounts,” said
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 18 Submit Your Articles
Tim Eisenhauer is president and
co-founder of Axero Solutions, a
leading intranet software vendor.
He’s also a bestselling author of Who
the Hell Wants to Work for You?:
Mastering Employee Engagement.
Would you like to comment?
a former Charlotte, North
Carolina employee.
And the result?
“A lot of people would make up
accounts so they could leave.” 2
The LA Times points out that fake
accounts were not the first line
of defense. Employees begged
their families and friends to open
new accounts. When that wasn’t
enough, they found creative
solutions. Canoga Park, California,
employees opened premium
accounts for Latino immigrants.
The premium status allowed the
immigrants to send money back
across the border free of charge
but required a minimum balance
of $25,000 within three months
of opening the account—or a
$30 monthly fee. To meet sales
quotas and keep the customers
happy, branch employees would
downgrade the original accounts
and open new premium ones
before the fees kicked in.
Short of any sales opportunities,
employees turned to their loved
ones to open ghost accounts.
And short of that, they forged
signatures of strangers to request
credit cards and equity lines.
They added overdraft protection,
PIN numbers, online access, and
other features that counted as
“products.”
When customers discovered
these unwanted services,
employees blamed a computer
error. Another trick was to change
the customer’s address to the
employee’s to hide from the
customer the credit card opened
in his name. Many customers had
no idea until the new credit card
showed up on their credit report.
Wells Fargo tried to keep these
problems under wraps by
settling the lawsuits and firing
branch-level employees. Between
2011 and 2016, 5,300 employees
lost their jobs for cheating to
meet goals. And some got fired
for blowing the whistle on the
company. In 2016, when the
story went worldwide, John
Stumpf finally admitted that the
goals were to blame for abusive
practices. On September 13, 2016,
he put an end to cross-selling:
“We are eliminating product sales
goals because we want to make
certain our customers have full
confidence that our retail bankers
are always focused on the best
interests of customers.”
Stumpf’s announcement did not
silence his critics. Half a dozen
federal agencies investigated
Wells Fargo. Among them is
the Securities and Exchange
Commission (SEC), which took a
keen interest in the bank’s loan
accounting practices.
For most of his life, John Stumpf
was an all-American success
story. He grew up on a farm in
a family of eleven kids. Stumpf
has credited his upbringing with
his work ethic and his reliance
on teamwork. So, where did he
go wrong?
There’s nothing wrong with stretch
goals. Nor with asking employees
to pitch in.
However…
If pressure is your only strategy,
you won’t likely get the result you
want. If you leave your employees
with no room to fail, you cannot
expect them to learn and grow.
Pressure doesn’t strengthen
your company.
Pressure looks for the weakest
link. And it always finds one.
If you’re tired of pressure, you
might like my book, because it
gives you better options
Notes
[1] 5 things to know about Wells Fargo
CEO John Stumpf by Aimee Picchi, CBS
MoneyWatch, September 14, 2016
[2] Wells Fargo made me work overtime—
without extra pay by Matt Egan,
CNNMoney, September 30, 2016
Are Performance Goals Motivating Or Demoralizing Your Employees?
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Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 20 Submit Your Articles
Now more than ever, companies need software
and data, and the people who can manage them,
to stay competitive. Machine learning, artificial
intelligence and predictive analytics are built by
software and feed on data. Not just any data – data
that has been harvested, cleaned, stored, analyzed
and leveraged. The chief architects of these systems
are data scientists – highly skilled mathematicians
and programmers. Data scientists are not able to do
this work alone. Data scientists need data engineers
Finding Tech Talent In
Unexpected Places
By Desa Burton
What HR executives need to know
to stay competitive
and data analysts to help accomplish this work. Data
engineers and data analysts help data scientists
perform at peak efficiency. Without them, a critical
piece of the data team is missing.
Staying Competitive in a Small Talent
Pond
This year, data science and analytics job openings
are projected to grow by nearly 15 percent with
364,000 job listings expected, according to a report
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 21 Submit Your Articles
by Burning Glass Technologies, BHEF and IBM.
What’s more, when these jobs open, they often remain
unfilled longer than other tech positions, signaling
that it is much harder for companies to find qualified
candidates.
So, how do big and small companies compete in a
relatively limited talent pond? By thinking outside the
box. Employers and the HR function within businesses
need to do two things:
1. Find innovative ways to bridge the skills gap,
through re-skilling and up-skilling, and
2. Consider qualified talent that does not have
traditional 4-year college degrees.
Why? Because in this fast-paced, technology-driven
world, more people are jumping into different careers
during different points of their lives with different
backgrounds, so employers need to be ready to
embrace the unconventional, non-traditional and
unexpected. As Alvin Toffler, the famous Futurist says,
“The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who
cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn,
unlearn, and relearn.”
Placing Skills Ahead of Degrees
Gone are the days of thinking a 4-year college degree
is needed to succeed in white-collar careers. Today,
it is becoming more of the norm, due to time, money
and personal factors, for adults to seek non-traditional
education options to learn and earn, especially in the
technology industry. As this new way of learning is
becoming more mainstream, senior business leaders
need to keep up with this changing mindset. While
recruitment continues at a rapid pace, an emerging
key to staying competitive is placing skills ahead of
degrees when hiring technical talent.
It is predicted that 65 percent of children entering
primary school will end up in jobs that don’t yet exist,
according to the World Economic Forum. Now is the
time to start building short-term and long-term hiring
roadmaps for your organization, reimagine hiring
requirements to become more nimble and diverse,
and waive the traditional four-year degree hiring
requirement to stay competitive. Highly-skilled and
passionate tech talent that has attended immersion
programs or software coding and data engineering
bootcamps like Zip Code Wilmington, one of the
country’s first nonprofit coding bootcamp, is available
to fill tech positions and can add value from the first
day on the job.
Indeed.com conducted a survey of more than
1,000 HR managers and technical recruiters at U.S.
companies of all sizes, and found that 72 percent
of employers think bootcamp grads are “just as
prepared” to be high performers as degree holders.
And, more than half of those surveyed said that hiring
bootcamp graduates is a good way to find job seekers
from underrepresented groups in the technology
sector.
Recruiting, Reskilling or Upskilling
through Bootcamps
Coding bootcamps are uniquely designed to ‘tech-up’
skilled and unskilled workers to become software
coders, data engineers and data analysts by offering
expedited training programs in this skillset to keep up
with rapid tech demands, societal changes and talent
supply.
Software coding and data engineering bootcamps
give adults the opportunity to begin or change their
career path and give companies the option to up-skill
their current workforce. This is a growing trend
as seen in the Delaware tech community which is
comprised of several large companies such as M&T
Bank, CSC, BlackRock, and Marlette Funding. If HR
and technology leadership teams stay open minded
and welcome new ways of attracting, finding and
retaining talent, they will help their companies stay
competitive.
Would you like to comment?
Desa Burton is Executive Director at Zip
Code Wilmington, a premier nonprofit
coding school located in Delaware.
Finding Tech Talent In Unexpected Places
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A perfect fit for your everyday HR journey. Our variety of webcast formats
give you the opportunity to ask questions, hear stories and share your own
expertise with an entire community of HR professionals. Staying connected,
current and compliant is key in the evolving world of HR.
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Simply register for the webcast(s)/virtual
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Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 23 Submit Your Articles
On January 31, 2020, the U.K.
officially cut ties with the
European Union, but didn’t clarify
how U.K. citizens, immigrants and
visitors are to move about the new
international barrier. The world
was given a hint on February 19,
when the U.K. government issued
a statement on its forthcoming
revised immigration policy.
Within what some are calling the
‘ambiguous’ brief, one change
is clear: the end of freedom
of movement.
As the statement says, “employers
will need to adjust,” how they
send foreign workers to the U.K.,
which has understandably created
anxiety among human resources
professionals who’ve been given
the task. For instance, starting
January 1, 2021, worldwide travel
to the U.K. will be governed by
a new points system that will
“transform the way in which all
migrants come to the U.K. to work,
study, visit or join their family.”
Brexit: What Talent
Managers Must
Know Now
By Jurga McClusky and Ian Robinson
Here are answers to some
frequently asked questions
FEATURE
The system will apply to EU and
non-EU migrants equally, and is
designed to favor entry for skilled
workers, students, leaders and
innovators while reducing reliance
on low-skilled labor from Europe.
Here are answers to some
frequently asked questions that
will help global talent managers
navigate these new waters with
confidence.
What Will Change with the
New Immigration Bill?
The new immigration bill has
broad implications for employers
who rely on migrant labor from
the EU. Because of the costs and
fees associated with work visas,
employers will be less likely to hire
people outside the U.K. unless
they must due to skills shortages.
By design, the new immigration
bill will make it difficult and
expensive for companies to bring
low-skilled labor from Europe into
the U.K.
Companies that find it challenging
to locate the skills they need
will have to be creative about
how they fill jobs, particularly
for positions that don’t require
a degree or special skills. Some
employers are already targeting
harder to reach groups, for
instance, older workers, women
returners and ex-service people.
Global companies may also shift
some operations abroad if that
makes sense from a financial and
talent management standpoint;
media reports suggest it’s already
happening in some sectors,
like finance.
Some industries will almost
certainly experience labor
shortages when the new rules
go into effect in January 2021.
Industries will be stress-tested,
and the U.K. government may
make adjustments to the rules.
The economy will likely be in a
different place as well several
months down the road. The policy
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 24 Submit Your Articles
Brexit: What Talent Managers Must Know Now
statement says the government
will monitor labor market data to
detect pressure in key sectors.
What Should HR
Organizations Do?
Understanding the implications
of upcoming changes is the key
to navigating them successfully.
The U.K. government’s policy
statement contains valuable
details on the design and scope
of the points system, salary and
skills thresholds, the visa process,
border crossing requirements and
much more. It’s a great place to
start.
HR and talent managers will
also need to work closely with
senior leaders to formulate a
strategy going forward. The
government will provide guidance
in the summer, and companies
can formulate a more detailed
strategy then. But in the interim,
it’s advisable to determine where
skills shortfalls are likely to occur
and how much time and money
the company will invest in fees
and benefits for migrant labor.
As companies recruit employees
and make hiring decisions, they
should exercise caution, keeping
the new rules in mind while
avoiding broadly discriminating
against candidates based on
their country of origin. The
best approach is to consider
candidates on the basis of their
skillset only, and then factor
in the prospective employee’s
immigration status when making
hiring decisions.
HR professionals and talent
management specialists who are
working with foreign nationals in
the U.K. should begin the process
of applying for work visas now, if
they haven’t already. Collecting
documents, gathering approvals,
etc., is a time-consuming process.
It’s also a good idea to update
HR handbooks and reach out
to affected employees to offer
residency assistance and let them
know what to expect.
How Can HR Professionals
and Talent Managers
Stay Informed and Get
Prepared?
Staying up-to-date in a fluid
situation is important, and the
U.K. government’s “what you need
to know” page features links to
basic information, updates and an
opt-in link to receive email alerts
about new information when it
becomes available. Talent mobility
trade associations and vendors
are a valuable source of data on
skills shortages and signing up for
immigration law firm alerts is also
a great idea.
The good news is that thanks to
the length of time it took from
the original Brexit vote to the
current transition period, some
– but not all – global companies
have had time to determine
their employees’ immigration
status and identify where staff
are working. That information is
critical in implementing a talent
mobility strategy, which will be
more important than ever when
the new U.K. immigration law
takes effect.
That said, when the government
releases guidance this summer,
many companies will experience a
time crunch as they race to ensure
that needed talent is in place.
To avoid being overwhelmed, it
may make sense to add staff to
handle the influx of planning and
documentation. The best strategy
right now is to stay informed and
prepare in advance, and there’s
no time like the present to get
started.
Jurga McClusky is a partner and
head of immigration at Deloitte, and
chair of the immigration committee at
Worldwide ERC.

Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 26 Submit Your Articles
When it comes to business transformation, what
is HR’s responsibility?
Believe it or not, it’s not only the job of top
management, rather it takes a holistic approach
where everyone is aligned with the company vision.
It’s important to note that, HR is a crucial part of
successful business transformation as it bridges
the gap between job roles and creates a winning
company culture.
Owning Employee
Transformation: The
Important Role of HR
By Dr. Patti Fletcher and Shrikant Pattahil
Podcast with guest Shrikant Pattahil on
disrupting your cradle-to-grave HR strategy
In this week’s podcast, I invited Shrikant Pattahil, the
President of Harbinger Systems and Lead Architect
of Harbinger Offline Content Player, to discuss
how changes in organizations are happening so
fast because of technology. HR is the catalyst for
transformation and they have to be independent and
adaptive to changes; HR has to lead.
PODCAST
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 27 Submit Your Articles
Owning Employee Transformation: The Important Role of HR
I asked about the personalization trends where
you bring people onboard and upscale them in the
right ways. According to Shrikant, “HR needs to
make sure they have onboarding programs, learning
management programs, or learning rescaling
programs specifically targeted to each and every
job role.
I’m delighted to be able to sit down and talk to
Shrikant about this topic. Here are some of the
highlights of our conversation:
Business transformation is quite the
topic, Shrikant, and it’s been an ongoing
conversation for a long time and yet very
little has been done about it. Business is
ripe for disruption and HR is ready for
transformation. The problem is those words
have all become buzzwords at this point.
Can you talk to us a little bit about what this
actually means when we say this is about HR
transforming?
If you look at the next 15 to 20 years in the
organization’s history or any organization’s history
they have to transform so rapidly because technology
is changing so fast especially organizations with more
than a thousand employees or more. They have to
take the employees consistently and every three to
five years things are changing. So HR needs to play a
very crucial role in this.
So if they are well aligned with the organization’s
strategy I think the process is going to be much
smoother and faster. HR, overall, needs to take more
ownership about transforming employees and not
leave it to just the leadership but be a leader
and part of that.
That can be done if they actually become more
technology aware and they’re more tech-savvy and
they don’t only depend on their partners and the
vendors for all the information so they have to take
the lead.
We understand that there is a scale thing but
times have changed and particularly around
the importance of listening to our employees,
what motivates them and what does not, and
what our role is in bridging the gap between
employee expectations and the experience
of work. We hear things like this all of the
time now: “Look, what I want as a worker is
something that appeals to me, that’s based on
me, that gets me from where I am to where
you want to be in the company.” So talk to us
a little bit about some of the personalization
trends particularly around bringing new
people on board and then being able to
upscale them in the right ways.
Patti, that’s a great point and I think there is one thing
that is very important and we all know that today,
people join organizations they are not looking for
a lifetime to be spent in the organization. They are
looking at probably 3 years, 5 years and what they can
achieve in thatspace.
So what HR needs to make sure is that they
have onboarding programs, they have learning
management programs, or learning rescaling
programs specifically targeted to each and every job
role. They cannot look at you knowing we have one
single system which will cater to everybody in the
organization and they need to make sure that every
2-3 years as the organization is changing.
They need to consider that we’re big investments,
almost like platforms and then build small
applications and new innovative solutions both in
terms of processes as well as technology, so that
they can really transform and change as the industry
demands and keep the workforce highly productive
and highly engaged.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 28 Submit Your Articles
Owning Employee Transformation: The Important Role of HR
You said something that is so critical that I
really want to call out, and that is when you
set up systems for people who you intend
to have them start at a young age and leave
when they retire. Can you talk a little bit
about the employee experience component
of where this fits in from getting rid of the
cradled agreement and what HR should care
about and think about?
Right now I think employee experience is the main
thing that every HR has top of mind. What happens
is, many people confuse user experience as a
learning experience. But employee experience really
means people have to be better productive and
better engaged. HR kind of defines what employee
experience means for their organization and for
different teams that they’re catering to and then select
the right tools and technologies to do that.
So it has to connect with everybody because
everybody is playing a crucial role in pushing the
organization forward. I think that’s something, from an
employee experience, that I feel organizations need
to take into consideration and HR for most needs to
understand and do that.
Shrikant, that is so interesting! There’s
something that you said that really triggered a
mindset shift and that about users of systems
that we invested in. What you are saying is, in
this new world where people are not cradleto-grave and probably even when they were,
we’re not talking about users we’re talking
about people! Understanding where those
people work organizationally and physically,
how they want to work, what devices they
want to use, or what kind of jobs they do
requires taking that person-first not user-first
approach. That’s a huge transformation in
mindset and in practice!
What’s your call to action to help HR
practitioners and leaders to start shifting
toward where they need to be?
My call-to-action is to make sure that from an HR
standpoint, you are as tech aware because you cannot
just be dependent on others to drive how HRs on the
technology side is going to do that option and help
organizations change.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 29 Submit Your Articles
Owning Employee Transformation: The Important Role of HR
Dr. Patti Fletcher
Chief Equity Advocate & HR Disrupter,
HR.com
Shrikant Pattahil
President of Harbinger Systems
and Lead Architect of Harbinger
Offline Content Player
HR.com Live!
Would you like to comment?
Secondly, you need to think about, you know each,
you cannot think about a whole platform solving your
entire HR needs or people needs. So you need a
platform but you also need a lot of solutions that are
tailor-made to each and every department and you
need to be prepared to handle that and facilitate so
that you know every department can function in the
best possible way to help the organization.
Third and most important, I think it’s only in their
headquarters but all the employees, the remote
employees, the gate workers, and everybody that HR
means to think about when it comes to his employee
experience and help them not with just better user
interface and better tools but actually see if those
are helping them be more productive and be more
engaged in their day to work and achieving the goals
that they’re looking forward to achieve.
The last point that Shrikant shared really brings us full
circle to where you begin. Technology is important
but you need to figure out what you want to do with it.
Think about “What is the problem we’re trying to solve
here?” They are called missions after all.
To learn more about owning employee
transformations you can listen to the full 15 minute
podcast here:
Want more? Subscribe to our official HR.com LIVE!
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Space!
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Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 31 Submit Your Articles
Startup executives dream of rapid growth.
Successful funding rounds, product launches
and growing brand recognition make your company a
desirable place to work, and before you know it, your
20-strong founding team has grown exponentially,
reaching 200. Specialist teams support executives
and bring their unique talents and capabilities to bear,
enabling the firm to grow outwards in directions its
founders had never anticipated.
When the number of employees in a workplace grows
so fast, companies face two main problems. Let’s call
them alignment and accountability. The question of
alignment is one of a shared vision: what are we all
aiming for? Inculcating a workplace to adopt common
goals is frequently time-consuming and while the
concept might sound vague, it is essential to foster
positive internal communication. Accountability,
meanwhile, is the issue of who is responsible for
what. How many times have you heard new and even
not-so-new employees asking, ‘Who in the office is
responsible for…?’? Now imagine how cacophonous
those questions sound when 90% of the workplace
has been at the company for less than a year.
Responding to the twin challenges of alignment
and accountability requires a strategy. These issues
can become very disruptive, very fast, if they’re not
addressed with a holistic solution. Alignment and
accountability are essential components of HR
management, especially in companies focused on a
Key Tips For Embracing
The OKR Philosophy
By Sam Fromson
How creating a clear framework for measuring
goals helps companies realise their vision
specific issue, and company-wide OKRs are crucial as
a means of achieving those goals.
OKR (Objectives and Key Results) is a framework
for defining, measuring, monitoring and following
up on objectives within an organisation. As a theory,
OKR was introduced in the 1970s and 1980s and its
FEATURE
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 32 Submit Your Articles
Key Tips For Embracing The OKR Philosophy
Sam Fromson is the Co-Founder
and COO of yulife, the company
pioneering a new type of life insurance
by encouraging holders to live their
best lives. Sam trained as a rabbi,
worked as an investor and led business
development and operations at an
alternative lender. He holds an MA from
University of Cambridge in Material
Science.
Would you like to comment?
methods were popularised at Intel, later being rolled
out across a number of other leading tech firms.
The basic format is very simple. You take an objective,
and say: I will do X, as measured by Y. The goal must
describe both what you are going to achieve, and how
you are going to measure that you have achieved it.
The Objective is what you are going to achieve, and
the Key Results are the way you’re going to know if
you’re getting there. For example, an Objective can
be, ‘We will delight our customers’, and one of the
accompanying Key Results could be ‘increasing our
Net Promotor Score to 75%’. When Google was using
OKR while launching its first web browser, its Key
Result was 20 million Chrome users within a year
(which it didn’t achieve). But by revising its targets,
Google targeted 100 million Chrome users within
three years of operation – which it easily surpassed.
In order to work properly, Key Results must be
measurable, and must describe outcomes rather than
activities. For instance, ‘Be nicer to customers’ cannot
be a Key Result, because it’s not measurable. Once we
make that goal a bit more precise, by saying ‘Reduce
the number of complaints about customer service to
less than one per week’, we have a measurable Key
Result. ‘Spend at least five hours training the customer
service team on using FooDesk’ is also not a Key
Result, because it’s an activity rather than an outcome.
We can make it into a Key Result by specifying the
outcome: ‘Get no more than two support requests
from customer service per week about how to use
FooDesk’. That also empowers teams, because it
gives them greater flexibility in determining how to
go about achieving their aims, removing the need for
micro-management.
OKRs have to be transparent. Everyone at the
company should have access to everyone else’s
OKRs and current results. When different teams are
collaborating on a project, each team should have
OKRs that can be clearly communicated across
different groups, while quarterly reviews are also
essential to ensure that OKRs are followed upon.
But the ‘what’ and the ‘how’ isn’t the whole story
behind OKR. The ‘why’ is an essential component as
well. According to John Doerr, who introduced OKR
to Google and is considered the theory’s greatest
advocate, ‘truly transformational teams combine their
ambitions to their passions and their purpose.’ When
running a company that seeks to offer incentives
for embodying certain values, OKR can be used as a
means of instilling accountability and encouraging
teams to live up to their goals.
A team of 20 employees isn’t too small to start rolling
out OKRs. Once bosses bring new team members
on board with the OKR methodology, individual
employees and teams are can begin to build their own
OKRs and spread them throughout their company.
Companies can make OKR part of their routine,
for instance by going over objectives and values
at weekly kickoff meetings or by regularly talking
through company-wide annual OKRs at team briefings.
If you harness this methodology properly then you can
inspire and motivate a team of exceptional people to
achieve great things. You can keep creative energy
aligned towards a common goal, and you can lay the
foundation for a truly outstanding business.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 33 Submit Your Articles
Get this…
A recent study has shown that
22% of employees actually prefer
calling in sick than facing a
performance review.
But get this too…
The State of Employee
Engagement Report by OfficeVibe
says loud and clear that 82%
of employees really appreciate
receiving feedback – whether it is
inherently positive, or negative.
So, what do these two
contradicting facts tell us?
Feedback improves performance.
But the generic and prevalent
performance reviews or employee
evaluations of HR have little to do
with a true culture of feedback and
everything to do with making talent
feel threatened and uncomfortable.
Let Us Agree –
Performance Reviews Are
Broken
The best way to go about
identifying where the disconnect
lies is diving into modern
Employee Performance
Evaluation Modules
By Diana Korza
Don’t buy one without these 6 key features
productivity and performance
research that can layout the
best practices, and contrast the
current state of affairs to the
ideal scenario.
#1 Performance Reviews
Disregard the Part Played
by Trust
Trust may seem like an intangible,
unquantifiable parameter when it
comes to impacting something as
crucial as employee performance,
but do not underestimate the
value of trust as a part of your
workplace culture.
Leadership IQ surveyed 7000
executives, managers and
employees and it found that 32%
of talent stay or churn based
on the trust they have in their
managers and in the company.
Moreover, trust is an important
component of what the People
Operations at Google define as
“psychological safety” of a team.
The concept is simple. Employees
who trust that the management
and their managers have created
an ecosystem where they are free
to take risks and think outside
the box without the fear of being
ridiculed for failing, are not only
more receptive to feedback, they
also end up being up to 40% more
productive than their peers who
operate in an environment where
the management looms as a
threat to make them conform to
company policies.
Performance reviews the way
they are structured today leave
no room for trust building. They
happen once, or at the very most
twice, a year. The process feels
unnatural and alien. Often there
exists no informal communication
between those who are being
evaluated (the employees) and
those who are on the other side
of the table conducting the
evaluations (the managers).
The output is rendered useless,
except as a source of anxiety
for talent, because the trust
that would enable its faithful
assimilation is missing from
the mix.
Workers assume that the result of
the evaluation is an indictment of
their performance and go to great
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 34 Submit Your Articles
Employee Performance Evaluation Modules
lengths to avoid taking anything
that comes out of it to heart.
#2 Performance Reviews
Position Feedback
Subjectively (and
Negatively)
Performance reviews may actually
push top employees to quietly
leave your company!
Here is why.
74% of people who struggle at
work, already know that they are
facing issues. This prepares them
for a relatively negative evaluation
of their performance. But on the
other hand, those who like to
grow and learn are considerably
perturbed by critical feedback,
because they are unsuspecting
of any form of attack (even
imagined) on their track record.
This is reflected in Josh Bersin’s
study where he talks about
Microsoft completely disbanding
its performance management
process after discovering how
evaluations have lost them their
A-players.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 35 Submit Your Articles
There are a number of reasons
driving this phenomenon.
Performance reviews are
typically viewed as subjective.
The upward approach where only
the blinkered view point of distant
managers is relied on for an
assessment is dying a lingering
death. Diversity in insights and
opinions from multiple raters
is what paints a full circle or
complete picture of an individual’s
capacity and contributions. And
it is this type of rich feedback
that employees interested in
growing within an organization
actually seek.
Performance reviews push
managers towards the Central
Tendency Bias. Providing
honest feedback can be deeply
disconcerting. An easy way out
is to grade most employees an
average, with a smattering of high
performers and a few outliers
who need immediate attention to
improve their output. However, it
is proven that 69% of company
talent crave better recognition. It
is only when they are shown to be
exceptional do they call upon their
reservoirs of discretionary energy
and go above and beyond the call
of duty. In short, performance
reviews not done well encourage
disengagement and dissatisfaction at work.
#3 Performance
Evaluations are One-Sided
This again boils down
partly to trust. In traditional
performance evaluations, all the
communication is one-way, and
potentially coming from someone
(the managers) who have not had
the time to foster mutual trust and
respect with the employee.
Cue in the already discussed
problem of the exercise becoming
futile because the worker is
not receptive to the feedback
being shared.
But there is another opportunity
being squandered here.
Studies by Gallup have shown
that management can also
benefit directly from performance
evaluations. In fact, the managers
who are open to feedback from
employees and actively solicit them
during evaluations are perceived to
be better leaders, and they improve
their overall profitability by 8.9%.
Employee Performance Evaluation Modules
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 36 Submit Your Articles
#4 Performance
Evaluations Focus
on Efficiency, Not
Productivity
Efficiency and productivity
may seem like two sides of the
same coin, but in terms of what
they mean for a business, the
difference is significant. When
a company wants its workforce
to be efficient, it is basically
demanding “more in less time”.
More of what?
That is where productivity steps
in. It is not enough to have an
army of workers who know the
fastest way to wrap up tasks.
They must also master the
science of choosing the right
tasks, at the right time. Especially
since the global economy is now
one of knowledge workers.
Traditional performance
evaluations do nothing to
align results with goals that
are important to rendering the
purpose of a company. They fail
to match personal employee
motivations with the overarching
objective of the business, thereby
stifling accountability, the sense
of belonging, and loyalty.
Employee Performance
Evaluation Modules
& 6 Features to Mend
Performance Reviews
Strategy will obviously lead the
way if performance evaluations
are to find a place in the workforce
of tomorrow.
But tools can help to a large
extent by translating strategy into
action, and then automating these
actions for smooth execution.
If you are interested in fixing the
anomalies that traditional evals have
introduced in your company, then
find a performance review module
with these six key features:
360 Degree Continuous
Feedback
The term “360 degree” stands for
the fact that this type of feedback is
solicited from multiple stakeholders
within the company. Managers,
peers, those who are managed
– everyone gets to add to the
insights about the contributions
and competencies of an individual.
Exhaustive research has shown that
such evaluations are relied upon
as rich, helpful, transparent and are
more likely to affect positive changes
in the people receiving them.
The ideal software solution leads
with a customized approach where
Employee Performance Evaluation Modules
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 37 Submit Your Articles
some parameters can be gauged
on an objective numbers scale
(with the proper context), and
some parameters require
those who are conducting
the evaluation to share
subjective feedback.
Other factors to consider are the
frequency of assessment and
the ease of receiving feedback.
Performance evaluations are the
most effective when they are
conducted throughout the year
to account for random dips in
the productivity of employees, or
unforeseen events that can derail
work-life balance. Moreover,
individuals should be able to
proactively ask for feedback,
since this helps build confidence
in their abilities.
Easy One-on-One
Meetings
Performance evaluations lose
their grip on the psyche of
employees, if they are used to
interacting with their managers
in a one-on-one setting. These
informal meetings normalize the
giving and receiving of feedback
and go a very long way in creating
that “psychological safety” which
shapes excellent workers.
Ideally, managers should be
able to quickly and discreetly
book these meetings, with
an automatic overview of the
schedule of the team member.
Conversely, talent should also be
able to request a session without
jumping through hoops.
CakeHR’s performance module
even goes so far to give
supervisors the ability to add
meeting notes to the event,
choose a goal as the focus of
the discussion, and effortlessly
generate a PDF of the meeting
output for quick sharing.
Goal Setting
Objectives and Key Results
(OKRs) is by far the most effective
goal setting framework available
to businesses. It combines the
specificity and clarity of the
SMART goal setting paradigm,
with the freedom and flexibility of
cascading alignment.
Leadership identifies desired
improvements in areas that
matter. However, the process of
Employee Performance Evaluation Modules
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 38 Submit Your Articles
The ability to pull custom reports,
visualize how productivity pans
across teams, and spot gaps that
can be filled to optimize workforce
output are available to companies,
and too good to be passed up.
Giving performance reviews a new
lease on life, while respecting the
changing needs of the workforce
and the call for more stringent
privacy measures is a big ask.
But evaluation modules with
features like 360-degree
feedback, one-on-one meetings,
goal setting options, custom
engagement surveys, integrated
career planning and people
analytics are a step in the right
direction.
executing projects to bring about
these improvements is left to the
discretion of managers, and to a
large extent even the employees.
Workers are assigned individual
goals to measure performance in
their domains. But these goals all
tie back to the OKRs selected for
the quarter.
Performance evaluation modules
with the right goal setting options
allow the leadership to set OKRs
for the company, and assign
smaller, personalized goals to
workers who are then assessed
in their context through the
fair and objective channel of
360-degree feedback.
Engagement Surveys
Engagement surveys take
two-way communication to the
next level. Management can
put its finger on the pulse of
employee satisfaction, and even
encourage workers to share their
perception of the performance of
the leadership of the company, in
order to improve it.
Good performance evaluation
modules should provide the
option of anonymous feedback,
offer easy and visual aggregation
of employee sentiments,
support customization of survey
questions, and last but not
the least, be accessible from
mobile devices.
Career Planning &
Learning
Employees feel the most fulfilled
when they are confident that
their personal career goals will
be fulfilled as they work towards
realizing the mission of the
company. This is why career
planning, a well thought out
career path and custom learning
tracks are crucial in today’s
dynamic market.
● Skills are becoming obsolete at
a rapid pace. For example, the
half-life of a digital marketer’s
know-how is only 2.5 years.
This is why performance
evaluation modules need
to integrate learning tracks
that supplement existing
knowledge with suggestions of
new, relevant upgrades, as they
become available.
● The whole point of an
evaluation is to map the
strengths and weaknesses
of employees, strategically
capitalizing on the former,
while helping them mitigate
the latter. Through intuitive
and progressive career
planning, purportedly mediocre
performers can find their
“sweet spot” and generate
exceptional value for the
business.
People Analytics
According to a survey by Deloitte,
globally 70% of organizations
are in the midst of projects to
deploy people analytics solutions.
Businesses have woken up to
the truth that customers stand
for revenue, but employees are
by far their largest expense.
In the wake of employee
experience as a major trend to
focus on, people analytics in
performance evaluation modules
is non-negotiable.
Employee Performance Evaluation Modules
Would you like to comment?
Diana Korza is a sales representative
at HR software company CakeHR by
Sage, keeping a sharp eye on SaaS,
B2B, HR, and sales.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 39 Submit Your Articles
There are many performance
management tools available
to companies, but one that
remains in place is the employee
performance review. Most
organisations beginning to
Performance Reviews
vs Focal Reviews: The
How, Why & When
By Robyn South
Is one type of review better than
the other?
implement employee performance
reviews start off with the basic
annual review which often
falls in line with, or has some
connection to, the employee’s
commencement date.
However, performance reviews are
often criticised by management
for causing an interruption to the
workflow of their departments and
over time this ends up creating a
challenge to coordinate, especially
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 40 Submit Your Articles
for larger organisations, which all
too often leads to people slipping
through the net and performance
management problems don’t get
highlighted until later on.
“Only 5% Of HR Leaders
Are Satisfied With
Performance Reviews”
How Are Performance
Reviews Carried out
Against Focal Reviews?
Standard performance reviews
are often conducted annually and
in-line with an employee’s start
date, for example, 3 months, 6
months and 1 year. This means
that the review process is
sporadic across the entire year
due to the fact that people get
recruited at all different times and
there is usually, from personal
experience, a lot of chasing up
between HR and management to
stay on track. Managers using
this performance review type may
have a bit more leeway to delay
reviews as there is no immediate
pressure from HR to get it done
unless it has been flagged as
overdue.
This can cause tension between
HR and management and a
resistance to get performance
reviews develop over time which
causes dissatisfaction with part
of their role as a manager and
defeats the whole purpose of
the exercise.
A review method that is gaining
popularity is the focal review,
sometimes referred to as
common date or scheduled
reviews. Instead of conducting
reviews based on the anniversary
of an employee’s commencement
date, the focal review looks at
performing an entire departments
reviews at the same time.
Although this may sound daunting
to management of larger teams,
it does create motivation to get
completed on time as everyone is
aware of the date they are to be
submitted and HR tech options
are able to support the more
timely aspects of the process.
Disadvantages of the focal review
are that newer employees will still
have their performance formally
evaluated without a full year of
service behind them and other
tasks may need to be neglected
for a time whilst the reviews are
being completed.
Why Are Focal Reviews
Becoming More Popular vs
Performance Reviews?
To try and avoid downtime in
a department, organisations
consider the focal review to
reduce disruption throughout the
year. Although the focal process
requires some tight scheduling,
it leaves the remainder of the
year to just continue with regular
performance check-ins and
employees can actually focus
on the individual, departmental
and company-wide goals and
objectives.
HR can also spend more time on
using the data collated from the
reviews to develop and implement
performance boosting strategies
rather than chasing up paperwork,
and because tech can play a big
part in the smooth running of any
review process, the scheduling
and communication of mass
reviews within a short window of
time is made a lot easier with an
effective HR system.
With reviews being carried out
on the same date using the
focal method, organisations are
benefiting from the following:
● More regulated check-ins at an
organisational level to monitor
company objectives alongside
annual goals
● Better organised preparation if
everyone involved is aware of
the review date
● Better data insights for
strategic planning purposes
● All employees performance is
evaluated against the same
measures of success that
the company is focused on at
that time
● Provides a better overview of
an organisation at a certain
point in time
● Easier to operate and manage
as the process is carried out
within a small window of time
rather than spanning across
the entire year
● Greater cost control, especially
if reviews fall in-line with
annual salary increases
● On-time administration
creating less work from HR to
chase up outstanding reviews
● Can easily be aligned with
business goals and objectives
● Less chance of employee
reviews getting pushed to one
side or forgotten about
● Easier to assess data and
analytics of performance
Performance Reviews vs Focal Reviews: The How, Why & When
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 41 Submit Your Articles
across all departments and
can see performance of
organisation as a whole
When Is the Best Time
to Transition to a
Focal Review in Your
Organisation?
The process to transition from
a performance review to a focal
review isn’t always an easy
one and can require months of
preparation with heavy reliance on
HR tech, depending on the size of
the company and whether salaries
and bonuses need to be prorated
with the change of review date.
Successful implementation
requires a strong business case
which lays out and considers
the impact the review change
may have on the business and
its departments. The process
and timeline should be carefully
thought out to fall in line with
other significant dates in the
company calendar (such as
organisational goal deadlines,
budget reviews, tasks that
cannot be put to one side, etc.)
and communication needs to
be open between HR, Payroll
and Finance as part of the key
decision making process to
ensure that labour resources and
costs are accurately calculated
against budget.
The focal review doesn’t have
to be the only review type held
annually either. Semi-formal,
continuous, transparent feedback
should be made part of your
company’s performance review
strategy to ensure targets are
on course, skill-set shortages
and issues are identified and
addressed immediately and
expectations are being met.
Create Understanding
First
A big problem with any type of
performance review is not the
system, but the understanding
behind them. Performance
reviews are not always considered
as a beneficial performance
management tool which is why
there is a lot of resistance to get
them done and HR will hear a
million and one excuses as to
why they are an inconvenience
to the day to day running of a
department – and that’s what
needs to change.
So first things first, HR must
develop and communicate
the reasoning behind the
performance review process to
both management and employees
so that it is clear that they are
not just an opportunity to get a
telling off or part of a tick-box
exercise. Training managers
in best practice to deliver a
successful performance review
will motivate and enthuse staff to
work on issues with support and
be praised for great performance
and behaviour. Until this step
has been completed, no review
process, whether it be an annual
performance review or focal
review, will make a positive
difference to your business.
Both the performance review
and focal review appraisal
systems have clear pros and
cons and although there appear
to be more benefits to both the
employee and organisation when
implementing the focal review, it
really is dependant on the scale
and operations of the business
and the resources available by
means of staffing, budget and HR
systems.
Ultimately, companies need
to choose the review type that
best supports the needs and
productivity of the business.
Does your company use the focal
review method? And if so, we
would love to hear your opinions
on it!
Would you like to comment?
Robyn South is an HR professional
with over 7 years’ experience in
generalist and complex employee
relations matters. A newly established
Virtual HR Assistant offering a range
of HR services online, who loves
to travel and part of the content
management team at HR software
company CakeHR.
Performance Reviews vs Focal Reviews: The How, Why & When
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 42 Submit Your Articles
I
n these unprecedented times,
when most businesses are
immobilized, business leaders
face the challenge of becoming
disconnected from customers,
suppliers and employees
sequestered in their homes.
Market opportunities have frozen.
To survive, leaders must change
their way of thinking. Instead
of finding opportunities in what
were formally viable business
channels, they must investigate
new, unchartered territory. Their
employees can help.
Each individual staff member
represents a multidimensional
stockpile of expertise and
interests, which have been built
prior to or outside of their current
work. For example, the person
working as an IT consultant
may also have been a Marines
veteran with specialization in
intelligence and extensive social
capital across veteran-based
organizations. An employee
Mobilizing Edgy
Expertise In Times Of
Market Disruption
A step-by-step process to put the expertise of
your staff to work on pressing problems
By Julia Ivy
working in the procurement
department may have past
experience in the emerging
economy of constant disruptions.
Still another employee has raised
three home-schooled children
with regular online interactions.
Their current employer may not
have been aware of the broader
expertise they can bring.
Tapping into employees’ unused
qualifications could open up
innovative new practices that
could make a difference in
remaining afloat through this
time of crisis, or even new
opportunities for being relevant
and connected.
Use this step-by-step Make
Your Case process to put the
multidimensional expertise of
your staff to work on pressing
problems. It will give them a
chance to demonstrate their
professionalism and shape their
space within your transforming
organization or industry as they
wait for the “all clear” to return to
the office.
1. Describe the challenge
that needs a solution. Clearly
communicate the situation
the organization faces — the
circumstances that brought it
on and the hurdles it expects to
encounter. Frame the challenge
using the Five Ws: Who are
the decision makers, what the
challenge entails, wherein the
organization the challenge
originated, when it must be solved,
and why it must be resolved. Invite
staff to participate in a Make
Your Case exercise to provide
out-of-the-box ideas that offer
solutions.
2. Identify volunteers. Ask
staff members to specify their
experiences and capabilities
they can offer to solve the
challenge. Clarify that any
relevant capabilities are welcome,
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 43 Submit Your Articles
Mobilizing Edgy Expertise In Times Of Market Disruption
especially if employees have
experiences in dealing with similar
challenges in different settings.
Volunteers may self-organize into
groups or work individually. Invite
questions that will help clarify the
challenge and indicate available
resources. Connect them with
those who are currently working
on the challenge to entertain
diverse perspectives and ensure
everyone involved has a voice.
3. Standardize the process of
bridging ideas with realities. Ask
teams and individuals developing
a Make Your Case proposal to
summarize their understanding
of the challenge and its context
in a short document using a
specified structure. For example,
this might include: the challenge,
the challenge background, the
current situation, and the question
that needs to be answered. Title
the case with reference to the
challenge, such as: “Reconnecting
Socially While Staying Distant
Physically.” It’s important that
employees not skip this step and
rush into delivering new ideas
right away. While many are eager
to make a pitch to prove that
they’re ready to solve the problem,
they trigger an opposite reaction
— their ideas are rejected as not
grounded in veracity.
4. Be open-minded in estimating
the added value. Ask employees
to prepare a consulting report
that analyzes the company
challenge through the prism
of the information they collect
and the expertise they bring.
For instance, an employee with
experience in providing takeout
Would you like to comment?
Julia Ivy, Ph.D. Psych, Ph.D. Mgmt,
is a strategy and international
business executive professor and
faculty director at Northeastern
University. Her area of expertise is
in bridging strategy and psychology
in the concept of personal strategy.
In addition to her academic work,
she acts as an executive coach
for those facing the “What’s next?”
challenge. Her new book is Crafting
Your Edge for Today’s Job Market:
Using the BE-EDGE Method for
Consulting Cases and Capstone
Projects (Emerald Publishing, Oct. 7,
2019).
services might recommend
offering curb-side service where
people can pick up products while
remaining socially distant. The
mother who home-schooled her
children may recommend online
activities and develop productrelated surveys that would keep
customers engaged. The former
marine might suggest the most
effective way to share information
within the company. Ask them
to elaborate on the action steps
and determine whether they will
generate value for the company.
Assess how well the cases
address possible obstacles or
needed resources.
As the ideas come from other
contexts, they can add an edge
to the company’s competitiveness if leaders are open-minded
and willing to challenge
industry boundaries.
5. Provide feedback and a plan
to move forward. Always offer
feedback on each Make Your
Case proposal. Let the staff
know how much the company
leadership appreciates their
initiative and fresh ideas. If
the case challenge is adopted
in its entirety or in part, give
full credit where it’s due.
Together, determine the next
steps, timelines and roles. If
possible, encourage Make Your
Case authors to publish their
cases in case collections or
professional journals, or present
them at professional conferences,
which further earns them credit
and showcases your company.
Communicating openly regarding
the challenges the company
faces is an effective way to rally
employees to take action. They
are often grateful that company
leaders asked for their ideas
instead of keeping them in
the dark. The companies that
utilize this practice will benefit
from involved employees and
innovative ideas.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 44 Submit Your Articles
The Power of Habits
Although I like variety and change, I am also a big fan
of well-established habits. Part of my time is spent on
daily, weekly or annual habits.
Examples:
● Daily: meditating (with Headspace). A cold shower.
No meat. Seven hours sleep.
● Weekly: 3-4 times running, total at least 30K.
● Bi-weekly: Ajax home match (during the season).
● Annually: Certain runs (like the Posbankloop and
the Zevenheuvelenloop). A couple of weeks in the
sun during the winter.
Habits at Work
Habits can be powerful, also at work.
Some suggestions:
1. Lunch walk
Easy to do, good for your health. Go for a lunch walk
instead of eating a fat lunch. For those who work in or
near the Symphony building in Amsterdam Zuid I once
created an overview of 10 lunch walks (Symphony
Lunch Walks).
2. Inbox empty
I have hardly ever reached this goal, but still, I am
convinced this is a worthwhile practice. I once worked
with a CFO who really mastered this practice. He
looked at his inbox only a couple of times per day, and
then took immediate action. He either answered the
mail, delegated a task to one of his people, moved the
mail to the waste basket or stored it for later action.
Establishing
Workplace Habits
By Tom Haak
10 suggestions
The impression you got: this man is fast and very well
organised. A good image for a CFO.
3. Weekly stand-up
If you use an agile methodology like Scrum or not, a
weekly stand-up meeting with your team can develop
into a practice that is very much appreciated. Monday
morning, 8.30 weekly stand-up. 30 minutes with a
short update from your side (what are your priorities
for this week?), and asking people where they need
help this week. Good luck and off you go.
4. Walk around the office
If walking around the office once per day is not a
habit, it will look strange if you do it for the first time.
What is she doing here? Is something wrong? If you
do it daily, you and the people will get used to it. You
will find out it saves you a lot of time. Many short
questions can be asked during your daily round,
and you get a better idea of what is going on. This
practice is useful for everybody, not only leaders.
5. Clean Desk
One of my first jobs was in an organisation that
worked a lot for the military. Confidentiality was very
important. Clean desk was the rule, and if your desk
was not empty at the end of the day, disciplinary
measures would follow. I worked for six years in
this organisation, and this practice has always stuck
to me. “A clean desk shows a clean mind” was the
slogan, although others said, “A clean desk shows an
empty mind…”
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 45 Submit Your Articles
6. Daily compliment
A long time ago, I was involved in assessment centers
for accountants. One of the exercises was a role play,
where the participants had to meet with an unhappy
client. The client had a long list with issues, and the
assignment was to write a short follow up memo
after the meeting (“As this is the last meeting before
your holiday, please write a memo or memos for
your team, so that things can move on during your
holiday”). The client was unhappy about many things,
but she mentioned one thing positive: “Carl in your
team is fantastic, he is the only one who always helps
me immediately”. We did many assessments, but
no-one ever wrote a memo to Carl, passing on the
compliment. The negative issues got all the attention.
7. Leave your boss alone on Thursdays
From now on, leave your boss alone on Thursdays,
and maybe Tuesdays as well. She will appreciate this,
and it will develop into a habit that will help you to
develop your independence.
8. Read one work-related article per day
You want to read more but you can never find the
time. Reading one article per day or one chapter
of a book might help to move you in the right
direction. Early morning is a nice time to do this.
Mark interesting ideas. If you read electronically,
you can use Readwise to deepen your experience.
Use Instapaper to collect articles you want to
read later.
9. Connect to a new person
By circling around between the people you already
know and feel comfortable with, you might not get
enough new ideas and fresh insights. Meet some
new people, for example, the friends of your friends
or people your colleagues recommend. Once per
week or once per month meeting someone new must
be achievable.
10. Share one idea/thought/insight per day
Other people can benefit from your insights and
ideas. Sharing at least one post per day, for example
via LinkedIn, Slack or your internal media, can help
to establish your profile as a professional or even
thought leader.
Establishing Habits
Establishing new habits, or getting rid of old habits, is
not easy. There is loads of literature about this. The
very short summary: forget will power, but invest in
creating the conditions that will help you to establish
the new habits. Lunch walk: ask a colleague to
collect you three times per week for a walk. Giving
at least one compliment per day: put a reminder in
your calendar.
It also helps to build strings of routines, like: open
computer, go to task list to review daily tasks, give
someone a compliment, walk around the floor and
get a cup of coffee (or water), empty your inbox while
drinking your coffee and you are ready for the day.
Would you like to comment?
Tom Haak is the founder and director
of The HR Trend Institute. Prior to
founding the HR Trend Institute in
2014, Tom held senior HR positions in
companies as Arcadis, Aon, KPMG and
Philips. The HR Trend Institute detects,
follows and encourages smart and
creative use of trends in the field of
people and organizations, and also in
adjacent areas.
Establishing Workplace Habits
Forget will power, but invest
in creating the conditions that
will help you to establish the
new habits.
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 46 Submit Your Articles
As the world finds itself rapidly adopting
virtual meetings, many people struggle while
attempting to translate the in-person experience to
an online format. Luckily, there are some tried and
true actions neophytes can take to have their online
gatherings running like clockwork. By following ten
strategies for surviving in the virtual world, a newbie
can perform like a pro in record time.
Strategy One: Know What You Want to
Accomplish
Just as it’s important to have a game plan for an
in-person meeting, it’s essential that you have a
goal for any online get-together. Are you informing,
gathering information, looking for opinion, making a
decision, or something else? If you don’t know, your
meeting is not going to feel as tight as it could, and
you won’t look as put together as you might had you
done some thinking in advance.
Once you know the goal, it should inform the
meeting’s length, number of attendees, and desired
level of interaction. For example, if you’re discussing
your company’s new telecommuting rules and
short-term business plans, you’re probably not
seeking opinion but instead providing information
and perhaps answering questions. Given the
one-way nature of the bulk of that gathering, you
can probably accommodate far more people than
you could if your goal were to elicit opinion and
seek input.
Connecting Through The
Camera And Keyboard
By Kate Zabriskie
10 success strategies for managing
meetings in the virtual world
Strategy Two: Communicate Your
Expectations
Most people will do what you ask them to do if you
ask them to do it and you model the behavior. Be
specific and direct. If you want people to share their
cameras, have a slide outlining your request as people
join the meeting. If you want them to raise their hands
to answer a question, raise your hand when you ask
it. If you want people to type something in the chat
box, you should type as they are typing. The more
deliberate you are in your instruction and actions, the
better your chances of seeing what you want to see.
Strategy Three: Share a Roadmap
Just as an in-person meeting can benefit from an
agenda, virtual meetings need a roadmap or itinerary.
Furthermore, in the virtual world it is helpful to show
the agenda several times during the meeting and
point out where you are on the schedule. An agenda
check refocuses people who may have drifted off and
it gives them an easy onramp back to the meeting.
Furthermore, acknowledging where you are in the
process gives people a sense of movement (or lack of
movement, for that matter) and helps the group stay
on task.
Strategy Four: Recognize Technology
Diversity
When it comes to technology, the virtual world is not
equal. In a typical meeting, some participants will
have equipment and bandwidth worthy of a Hollywood
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 47 Submit Your Articles
production, while others will appear to have a dial-up
line reminiscent of equipment from the previous
century. For that reason, it’s important to think
about what could go wrong and how to troubleshoot
potential problems before they occur. For example,
will you record and post the meeting for people who
have difficulty joining? Do you have a dial-in number
for those attendees who can’t get VoIP technology
to work correctly? Will you send slides in advance
for people who have difficulty logging in altogether
and must rely solely on a PDF? The more you prepare
for problems, the easier they are to deal with should
they arise.
Strategy Five: Arrive Early and Start on
Time
If at all possible, it’s a good idea to arrive at your
virtual meeting well in advance of your participants.
The time you have in the virtual room before it
fills will give you an opportunity to troubleshoot
your technology, get comfortable in your seat,
and welcome early birds as they enter the room.
Your early arrival also allows you to avoid having
participants wait in a lobby. In principle, the lobby is a
neat concept. In practice, it can work against you. If
participants arrive at a lobby, they will more than likely
work on other tasks as they wait for you, and you’ll
have to work harder to get the full attention they were
initially prepared to give you.
Strategy Six: Accept You Are in a
Competition for Attention
Nothing says multitasking opportunity like a
web-based meeting. Even the most effective presenter
competes with a participant’s inbox, other work,
and just about any activity that is potentially more
interesting. You will have to double or even triple
your efforts to keep virtual attendees involved.
Putting yourself on camera and asking participants
to appear on camera is only the first step. Next, you
have to think about ways to keep people’s eyes on
the screen or handout and their hands busy about
Connecting Through The Camera And Keyboard
Talent Management Excellence presented by HR.com April 2020 48 Submit Your Articles
every two minutes. Two minutes? Yes! People want
to be engaged. If they don’t engage with you, they will
engage with something else.
Strategy Seven: Add Variety
The longer your meeting, the more important it is
for you to add variety. If you are taking a poll, for
example, consider conducting one using one that
uses fingers held up to screen, another that uses the
systems polling function, one that requires people
to stamp a shape on a Likert scale displayed on a
slide, and another that requires attendees to type a
number in the chat box. The idea is to avoid becoming
predicable. Slide, slide, poll; slide, slide, poll; slide,
slide poll equals BORING.
Strategy Eight: Balance Conversation
Just as people participate in in-person meetings at
various levels, the same thing will happen in the virtual
world. A good meeting facilitator will take action to
add balance. For instance, “I’m going to throw this
next question to the people I see in the second row
on my screen. That’s Jane, Josh, and Juan.” In that
example, nobody is individually put on the spot.
However, those three participants know that at least
one of them is on deck to speak next. In addition to
calling on a few people, you should also consider
directing people to different channels.
“If you would like to answer in the chat box, do that. If
you would prefer to open your microphone, go ahead.
If you would like to send a message just to me, send
a private chat.” The variety of avenues offered in
that example accommodate people who like to talk,
those who prefer to write, and others who are less
comfortable speaking up in public.
Strategy Nine: Consider Using a
Production Team
It takes time to master a virtual meeting program, and
even the pros can find it difficult to wear half a dozen
hats at once. If you are running a large meeting or
new to the process, consider assembling a team. For
example, designate someone to troubleshoot tech
problems for attendees, assign a chat monitor to bring
anything to your attention you don’t see right away,
and so forth.
Would you like to comment?
Kate Zabriskie is the president of
Business Training Works, Inc., a
Maryland-based talent development
firm. She and her team help businesses
establish customer service strategies
and train their people to live up to
what’s promised.
Strategy Ten: Limit Your Time and Use it
Wisely
No adult wants to sit for more than two hours at a
time, and this is especially true in the virtual world. If
you plan to move a six-hour meeting online and leave
the agenda essential as is, think again. For meetings
that are essentially information-sharing exercises,
consider limiting yourself to one-hour blocks. For
interactive conversations, as a rule of thumb, you
should be able to get away with two hours at a time.
Rarely, if ever, should you schedule more than four
hours a day. And those four hours should include a
generous break if possible. If you need more hours to
accomplish everything you need to, consider running
smaller meetings with fewer people, spreading a long
meeting over several days, or sharing video recordings
instead of bringing people together if they would
accomplish the same result.
It’s a new world for many people taking the plunge
into the world of virtual meetings, and now is the time
to get comfortable. Take the time now to leverage
a few simple strategies that will get you on solid
footing. Paying attention to what you like and don’t
that others do in their meetings will help you grow.
Asking for feedback from your attendees will further
accelerate the process. May your next online meeting
be a smashing success.
Connecting Through The Camera And Keyboard
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Publications
13 Targeted Publications
to Reach Your Audience
Informing, Educating, Enlightening and Assisting HR professionals
in their personal and professional development, the Excellence
series offers high-quality content through the publications! Leadership Excellence presented by HR.com DECEMBER 2019 1 Submit Your Articles
5 TENETS OF
LEADERSHIP
FOR 2020 AND
BEYOND
Building a more
collaborative, welcoming,
and mindful culture
– Arvin Patel
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol. 36 • No. 12
(ISSN 2562-0711)
08 14 22 29 Five Leadership Capabilities
Driving Business Success
– Elisa Friedman
Leaders, How Are You
‘Showing Up’ For Your Team?
– Anja van Beek
Managers, Do You Know How
Important The Quality Of Your
Leadership Is?
– Douglas Brown and Jacob Schneid
Earning Respect From Your
Team Members
– Hilary Jane Grosskopf
07 12 20 26 Tips For Training Remote
Teams, A Growing Workforce
– Tammy Bjelland
Retaining Millennial And Gen
Z Women
– Heidi Ganahl
Three Ways To Build Your
Business’ OKR Muscles
– Pedro Signorelli
How Objective Data Helps
Maximize Your Team
– Trevor J. Shylock
STRUGGLING WITH
AGENCY RETENTION?
Skip the ping pong tables, invest
in professional development
– Jessica Cortapasso
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol. 7 • No.12
WHEN ABSENCE
DOESN’T MAKE
THE HEART
GROW FONDER
Leave requests under
the ADA
– Janette Levey Frisch
5 Compliance Issues Every HR
12 20 28 35 Leader Should Know
– Rachel Sobel
Time Is Money
– Paul DeCamp
Pay Day, Every Day?
– Tyler Bernstein
Learn A Lesson
From Scrooge
– Wilson S. Jarrell
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol.06 • No.12
07 11 14 19 What You Don’t Know
About Pain Can Hurt You
– Wanda Swenson
Good Old Days?
– Jim Stovall
Are You Satisfied With
Who You Are At Work
And At Home?
– Lauren E Miller
Empathy In The
Workplace
– Lesley Lyons
DECEMBER 2019 • Vol. 24 • No. 12
EMOTIONS DRIVE
BEHAVIOR. DO

When most people think about payroll, words like
“accurate,” “timely,” and “weekly” or “biweekly” come
to mind, and as long as those needs are being met, we
rarely think about it much. But as disruptions happen
in many industries, and as the workforce continues to
evolve, payroll leaders, CEOs, and CFOs need to be
thinking about how they pay their people.
That’s why we put together “Payroll Innovation: Three
Workforce-Centered Trends that are Changing the
Payroll Landscape.” In this free eBook we discuss the
changing workforce and three payroll innovations that
are helping to meet the needs of these employees.
The Workforce is Evolving.
So Should Your Payroll.

Employee
Recognition
Employee
Communications
Engagement
Surveys
Reward Gateway helps over 1,800 companies worldwide boost employee
engagement with the only platform that centralizes employee recognition,
communications, surveys and discounts in one unified hub, tailored to your
unique employer band.
Reward Gateway works with Five Star Bank to increase strategic recognition,
shine a spotlight on the importance of employee engagement and improve
their business results.

Source: https://www.hr.com/en/magazines/talent_management_excellence_essentials/april_2020_talent_management/#ArticleList

Emerging VR & AR in Recruitment – The Simulation process

This VR program is asking the recruits to solve a puzzle in a simulated environment, and based on the results showcasing the strengths and abilities of the recruits. The company could make recruitment decisions, writes Paul Osborne is Chief Technology Officer of Cerdonis Technologies LLC.

Modern enterprises are increasingly opting for new technologies for enhanced efficiency. Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) have now grown popular for employee training, recruitment, and several other HR processes. Yes, those old days of finding resumes as the only concrete document for employee evaluation has gone with the wind of change. Now, a host of new technologies, including VR and AR, are making this possible most innovatively.

 

Recently, Lloyds Banking Group incorporated virtual reality for the assessment process of the Graduate Leadership Programme candidates. This VR program is asking the recruits to solve a puzzle in a simulated environment, and based on the results showcasing the strengths and abilities of the recruits, and the company could make recruitment decisions.

Let us explain here some of the time-tested ways VR and AR-based simulation can help in the modern recruitment process.

Helping Future Recruits to Experience the Workplace Remotely
There are other ways VR and AR can make the recruitment process easier. For example, during recruitment, employees spend considerable time in the company’s workplace for evaluating the work environment and its respective pros and cons. Now, a VR based simulated environment of a workplace can help employees give a better idea about the working environment they are going to be part of.

Most importantly, this can give employees relief from the compulsion of visiting the company’s workplace personally. While sitting miles away, they can get an air of the working environment right through their mobile device screen.

The recruitment process of Jet.com is a nice example of this practice. By offering VR based immersive presentations, the company is helping the recruits to get a clear idea of the workplace they are going to be a part of. The Walmart online shopping platform is also utilizing VR experience to showcase the working environment and experience of their workplace.

Making Use of Gamification for Job Applications
Recruitment is a competitive field since it allows a company to pull the best talents from the market and get a competitive edge. Since every company is working hard to get the best of the limited pool of talents in the job market, using new and innovative ways to get in touch with the right employees is essential.

In this respect, the use of gamification can be a good way to replace the old application processes with something efficient, new, and innovative. This will also help boost the interactivity of the recruitment process to a great extent. Instead of allowing the recruits to fill up a long-form with all the details such as educational qualification, experience, completed projects, etc., a gamified process can reveal this information through an interactive process.

This gamified process can particularly be useful for recruitment screening. ActiView is an Israeli startup that made use of VR technology to detect various behavioral habits and attributes that are required for evaluating the employees and their personalities.

Providing Technical Training to Employees
Virtual Reality (VR) can help in orienting the employees with various technical details related to their job roles. VR can also help in providing an immersive environment for new employee induction and training, which is very much a part of the recruitment process. Thanks to the use of VR, recruits can be better oriented with their job tasks and get engaged with their job roles faster.

Moreover, thanks to the immersive environment created with VR, an employee can get hands-on training on complex machines and technical parts right within a training room. VR will be able to flee the boundaries between reality and the virtual environment and help faster learning and engagement.

Providing Safety Training
In many industries and enterprise environments, employee safety is a constant matter of concern. In industries where safety concerns are too many, virtual reality can play an important role in safety training procedures. In many industries where employees need to take commendable risks for operating machines, handling equipment, and raw materials, VR based safety training procedures can train them better with procedures to ensure personal safety and well-being.

This is particularly true for dealing with the safety concerns of the production plants and facilities involving heavy machinery, chemicals, and life-threatening procedures and processes. For example, in the firefighting industry, the VR based training on new challenges corresponding to fire breakout incidents can be hugely beneficial to curb accidental cases.

Learn More: AR Meets HR: How Augmented Reality Can Strengthen Learning & Development

Safety training simulations based on VR may also need using different protective equipment, including safety helmets, hooks, goggles, etc. VR based simulated safety training can give employees a better idea about using this equipment and tools. Such VR based simulation can also guide the employees about making movement in different areas, using safety tools in a variety of contexts and operating machines. VR based simulated environments can help employees stay informed about the latest safety norms and how to utilize the safety procedures to their advantage.

A virtually created life-threatening or dangerous situation like an accident or a hazardous machine fault can be best shown, and the remedies can be best exemplified with a VR and AR-based simulated training environment. The simulated environment created by using VR technology also helps to leave a great positive impression on the employee psyche. It can always help him to prepare well for any such situation.

This is just the beginning of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) to be utilized in the recruitment, training, and HR processes of the enterprises. In the years to come, we can expect more companies to join the bandwagon of AR and VR based recruitment and HR management processes.

Source : https://www.hrtechnologist.com/articles/recruitment-onboarding/emerging-vr-ar-in-recruitment-the-simulation-process/

HR leaders to face tech-savvy workforce post-pandemic

HR leaders will be supporting a much more digitally-minded workforce after the coronavirus pandemic, with data showing that UK workers have adopted collaborative technology tools en masse during lockdown.

According to a study from work management platform Asana, almost two-thirds (62%) of full-time workers have reported increased use of tools such as Slack and Zoom since the lockdown began, with one in five (19%) using these tools for the first time.

This is despite most British workers not being well set up to work remotely when lockdown began.

More than two-thirds (67%) said they lacked a desk to work from, a PC or laptop, and/or a reliable internet connection when lockdown started.

Following over a month of lockdown, the concept of a work environment has changed dramatically, with just 31% of workers saying they were working from a desk.

The majority of respondents (35%) said they worked mostly from a dining or kitchen table, while 20% were using their sofa and 5% worked from bed.

Flexible working is also increasing, with 59% of respondents working different hours than they used to.

More than half (57%) of respondents said they were taking more breaks, and 36% reported fewer meetings.

Almost a third (30%) are starting their working day earlier, 27% are working later in the evening, and 24% are working in tandem with other priorities, such as childcare.

The vast majority (85%) of UK employees with school-age children are balancing homeschooling with their own work – the highest rate across all the countries Asana surveyed, including the US and Germany.

Of this group, 16% are starting work later, 32% are starting earlier, 41% are blocking out lunchtimes to spend time with their families, and 25% are finishing work earlier and then picking up later in the evening.

Almost four in five (79%) said this situation was significantly affecting their work, with 77% also admitting it was hard to switch off in the evenings.

Across all the respondents, the biggest challenges of enforced remote working emerged as self-discipline (45%), stress about the current health and economic situation (36%), and “feeling like I can’t switch off” (23%).

Speaking to HR magazine, Tom Blake, chief executive at consultancy Blake Connolly, said: “With the switch to working from home, many employees are showing just how adaptable they are. From learning new tech skills for on-line meetings, to creating makeshift workspaces and learning how to teach their children.

“But with that comes a level of balance that many are not quite getting right as they are finding it hard to switch off. Employers really need to consider how they are supporting their teams on multiple fronts; technologically, flexibility and mentally.”

Blake recommended HR and business leaders should start thinking about their organisations’ response once lockdown measures lift.

He added: “They might require employees to come back to the workplace, but employees may want a new level of flexibility as they have found they have been more productive and could be worried about returning to the physical work space.”

Source : https://www.hrmagazine.co.uk/article-details/hr-leaders-to-face-tech-savvy-workforce-post-pandemic

How Vulnerability Can Be a Leadership Superpower

Good leaders bring mentally healthy values to their teams and organizations. And that means showing weakness, at times, and facing the resulting risk of being perceived as a weak leader. But accessing that vulnerability is harder for some leaders than others.

In this episode, host Morra Aarons-Mele speaks with Jason Rosario about his own journey with depression and anxiety, and the lessons he’s learned about vulnerability, masculinity, and leadership. Rosario left a career in finance to found The Lives of Men, a social impact and creative agency focused on decoding masculine psychology and challenging false concepts of masculinity.

HBR Presents is a network of podcasts curated by HBR editors, bringing you the best business ideas from the leading minds in management. The views and opinions expressed are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Harvard Business Review or its affiliates.

Source : https://hbr.org/podcast/2020/05/how-vulnerability-can-be-a-leadership-superpower

Getting to be Strategic in HR

Human Capital Management ( HCM) has been gaining usage and momentum in recent times – particularly in the Digital HR space. HCM is indeed HR as we know and practice. As we know, HR has traditionally evolved from the role of Administration in an enterprise to managing various people functions such as recruitment, performance management, career planning ( rather rare in Organisations), compensation administration and training. However, over the last two decades or so the profession has indeed made many big strides and there is a growing sense of specialism in these areas, which is commanding good value for HR professionals. HR professionals are no longer just generalist HR practitioners but are gaining considerable stature and value in becoming “specialists” in these areas. Today an Employee Engagement specialist or an L&D professional is generally hard to find and if you do, they command a considerable premium and often difficult to afford! This development is good news for business as it now has talented professionals to lead and manage these functions well and thus deliver good value to both the employee and the business.

The not so good news though is the reality that often times HR is not seen as strategic and contributing to the strategic goals of the business. They seem to have remained operational in content and delivery. And that is the usual lament amongst business leaders. The big question, therefore, for HR, is how to play a strategic role?

In offering a response, let us first understand, the specific connotations of the word “strategy” as is being referred here. To me, strategic would mean making choices that lead to a distinct competitive advantage for the business. In this sense, HR of every business needs to know (and identify), what areas and actions if focused upon on the people side, could take the business to a position of advantage with its competitors. While this exercise needs to be undertaken specific to each business, we can offer or make suggestions of some areas that are generic to all businesses and will add to their competitive advantage. For example, Talent, the quality of people across the business and or specific to levels will be one. In an ever-increasing technology-centered world, skills of AI & ML are commanding a great premium for the reason that they add to a business’s competitive advantage. Another area would be the depth of Leadership pipeline as this would offer business, an ever available set of talent! Another area that is gaining considerable attention is this whole area of “Culture” – shared behaviors based on shared beliefs! New-age companies such as Netflix or Google are leveraging this dimension to stay ahead of the competition! As we started with strategy and its meaning to our context, these are the conscious choices that HR can and must make.

Thus moving the focus from the transaction and the routine to areas or activities that will truly bring competitive advantage to a business will make HR and its leadership more strategic! It is about a mindset more than competence and skill!

This article first appeared on solvecubehr blog (https://solvecubehr.com/blog/)