Want to be a better boss? Think like a coach

If you’re not sure how to manage a team, take a lesson out of a coaches’ playbook.

A good boss has to wear a lot of hats — mediator, air traffic controller, gatekeeper — but experts say one is particularly important for being a successful manager: coach.

“Productivity is connected to ‘learn it alls’ not ‘know it alls,’” says Rich Feller Ph.D., a counseling and career development professor at Colorado State University. “Managers who nudge internal motivation, tap natural aptitudes, and free talent to add value most succeed.” How exactly can a manager tap into this coach mindset? Here are a few easy steps.

FIRST: SIT BACK AND LISTEN
Often managers are promoted into their roles because they’re excellent at their particular job, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they have the ability to help others improve their skills. That’s why asking a lot of questions of your subordinates to understand their perspective on their job’s challenges or ideas they have for how to improve things is important, says Monique Valcour, Ph.D., an executive coach, management professor and keynote speaker. “What coaching involves is kind of sitting back in a curious and nonjudgmental mode and inviting the other person to give their thoughts,” she says. When presented with a problem at work (or an opportunity to improve things on your team), it’s a good time to ask open-ended questions of your employees to tap their creativity and see how they can contribute to a better end result.

Once any issues are brought to your attention, Valcour cites the “GROW” model as one method for problem solving if you’re new to the managing world. It consists of setting a goal (G), assessing the reality of where you are now (R), reviewing your options (O) and deciding what will you do (W).

KNOW THE RIGHT WAY TO GIVE FEEDBACK
Feedback gets a bad rap, but it doesn’t necessarily always have to entail a big formal conversation, says Elaine Varelas, managing partner at career consulting and coaching development firm Keystone Partners. Take a note from the coaches on the sideline at a sports game, cheering on athletes when they score a goal, and give feedback to your employees on the spot.

If you see something positive from a team member, like an excellent customer interaction or a major sales win, give praise right then and there, Varelas says. If you see something you’re disappointed in or have a concern about it, pull the employee aside and note it pretty soon after (but not in front of others) — there’s no need to wait for a formal review. “I think the focus needs to be on communication, where a manager is having conversations on a regular basis about performance … so it doesn’t become a shock when it is provided every six months [at a formal review],” she says.

Asking questions is important here, too. When a mistake occurs, you should inquire about what the employee’s line of thinking was that led them to make the error. If for example, a subordinate lacks attention to detail, you’ll want to flag that and explain that that skill is important for someone to succeed in the job, provide some examples of when the skill was lacking (like a missed meeting or a typo-riddled report) and ask the employee how he plans to remedy the problem.

Don’t feel comfortable having those conversations? Script out what you plan to say and role play with a peer or tap your own manager as a resource for how to have those tough talks, Varelas suggests.

SET GOALS THAT WILL KEEP YOUR TEAM HAPPY
Famous athletic coaches are known for plotting out a strategy that helps their team win — and that’s precisely what a good boss should do, too. According to Cynthia D. Marco-Scanlon, Ph.D., CCC, PCC-S, director of credentialing and special programs at the National Career Development Association, one of the most important things a successful manager should focus on is the career development of their employees. You don’t want to set people up for failure, so you want to help workers define realistic, practical and achievable goals about how they’ll stretch themselves in their current role, she says. (Think: what skills can an employee add to his repertoire in the next year? Not how he can become CEO.)

One of the biggest mistakes managers make is forgetting that people aren’t tools.

Valcour notes it’s important to do this on a formal and informal basis: both at scheduled annual reviews where development plans are formed and in regular one-on-one or team check ins where a manager, for example, delegates parts of a project to an employee. “It’s about inviting the employee to talk about the experience they’d like to gain in the next six months or projects they’d like to take on,” she says.

Ultimately, goal setting can have a major positive impact on workers’ happiness, according to Feller. “[One of the biggest mistakes managers make is] forgetting that people aren’t tools,” he says. “They’re motivated to learn when tasks increase their autonomy, use their natural strengths and promote their future.”

BE A CHEERLEADER FOR YOUR EMPLOYEES
Listen to any hot mic at a close sporting event and you’ll know that coaches are sometimes known for their colorful language. That has no place in the workplace, though. Marco-Scanlon says regular updates with your team sans negativity can help avoid ill will. “If you drop the ball on [communication] that does not bode well for your employees wondering what’s going on,” she says, adding that updates should take the forms of informal conversations, one-on-one check ins and team meetings, depending on the situation.

“That communication needs to be constant and empowering,” she says. “If you can, keep a positive attitude about things.” That doesn’t mean you can’t address problems — in fact, it’s important to address them head on — but you should steer clear of an “everything and everybody stinks” attitude.

“With that type of environment, people are going to leave,” Marco-Scanlon says. “They’re going to think ‘I’m going to take my talents elsewhere.’ And constant turnover leads to your wasting a lot of time retraining people.”

GIVE YOUR TEAM THE TOOLS THEY NEED TO SUCCEED
A great manager can be described as a tug boat. You continue to nudge them towards the goal but not come in and tow them someplace.

A great manager can be described as a tug boat. You continue to nudge them towards the goal but not come in and tow them someplace.
Figuring out what tools your employees’ need can take a number of forms, ranging from giving them equipment that will make their jobs easier to approving continuing education opportunities, conferences or networking membership fees, according to Varelas. This is once again an instance when establishing a dialogue comes in handy, so you can figure out if someone who works with Excel often could use a bigger computer monitor, or whether an employee wants to take a class to improve their public speaking skills. Whatever the resource, it should be something related to the job and provide a clear positive impact on the company in the long-term.

Bottom line: a boss’ job is to steer their employees towards their goals and the company’s overarching aims. “A great manager [can be] described as a tug boat,” Varelas says. “You continue to nudge them towards the goal but not come in and tow them someplace. But you continue to straighten them out and get them where they need to go.”

Source: https://www.nbcnews.com/better/business/want-be-better-boss-think-coach-ncna854226

Stephen Hawkings Advice For A Fulfilling Career

Stephen Hawking left a legacy that transcended academia – it’s found in motion pictures, best-selling books, and beyond.

His passion for science and unlocking the universe’s secrets inspired millions across the globe to be more curious about the universe.

Work gives you meaning and purpose, and life is empty without it – Stephen Hawking

In a 2010 interview with American journalist Diane Sawyer on ABC World News, Sawyer asked Hawking what advice he’d give to his children. One of the pieces of advice: “Work gives you meaning and purpose, and life is empty without it.”

Could his philosophy of work apply to all of us? Is life really empty without a job that not only puts bread on the table, but that also becomes self-actualising personal fulfilment?

“If you love what you do, then small problems that come up aren’t going to bug you and make you want to quit. It’s good for the individual and the organisation,” says Sally Maitlis, professor of organisational behaviour and leadership at the University of Oxford. “But when you love it to the point that it’s absolutely central to how you understand yourself and what your contribution to the world is, it can be damaging.”

Maitlis explored this notion last year with Kira Schabram, a University of Washington management professor, with a study of 50 animal shelter workers in North America: many were attracted to the occupation because of a childhood love of animals, or a belief that they had the right skills to make a difference.

As a result, workers poured in extra hours, volunteered for difficult shifts, constantly shared ideas. But many eventually burnt out or became frustrated. They encountered frequent euthanasia of animals, or had to deal with the realities of meager resources and poor management that plagued many of the shelters. Some eventually quit.

Picking a career that gives you an inner compass of purpose absolutely has positive effects on your life

Still, Maitlis and other experts all agree that picking a career that gives you an inner compass of purpose absolutely has positive effects on your life. Research has long backed this.

Last month, the American Psychological Association published an article that synthesised findings on this topic that stretch back as far as 1993. Research from Harvard professor Teresa Amabile found that “no matter the size of a goal – whether curing cancer or helping a colleague – having a sense of meaning and feeling a sense of progress can contribute to happiness in the workplace.”

But finding work with purpose can be hard for many.

Anat Lechner, a management professor at New York University, says it’s simply a matter of being aware of what you love to do. It’s when you’re so enthralled with what you’re doing, it’s hard to separate the hobby from the actual job. “You can’t separate Elon Musk from everything that he’s building,” she says.

You can’t separate Elon Musk from everything that he’s building – Anat Lechner

And while many people can actually identify these passions – the things that they naturally gravitate toward and might do for fun off the clock – they often don’t act on them, in terms of creating a career.

“They would rather go work at the JP Morgans because they think it’s a safe bet,” Lechner says. “They put a stop to things that otherwise could prosper and grow and value-add, and the world could pay back in a good way.”

The art of crafting

Amy Wrzesniewski, professor of organisational behaviour at Yale University, suggests overcoming this by “job crafting”: teasing out the bits you like about your current job, and then spin off into something that’s more rewarding as a whole.

This can apply to those types of workers Schabram and Maitlis studied: the ones who landed their dream job, but it wasn’t what they expected.

“Is there some way to stay involved in music, or whatever it might be, that allows you to connect with the elements [of the job] that are most meaningful?” Wrzesniewski asks. “Instead of being backed into a role definition?”

Some of the workers in Schabram and Maitlis’s study did this by pivoting away from shelters and turning to other jobs that were still animal-centric, like grooming and training.

Wrzesniewski also points to a self-sabotaging world view that prohibits people from finding the things they like.

Some think “you sort of have to discover it – almost like it’s an objective identity that lives in the world, and you have to turn over enough rocks to find it,” Wrzesniewski says. “It can create a ton of anxiety.” Instead, the process can be more trial-and-error experimenting.

Homing in on what you love can give you the raw energy that blends career and identity; that allows your work to give you greater meaning and purpose beyond chasing promotions or paying bills.

“When you’re so immersed in what it is you do, you become one,” Lechner says. “I think Hawking had that.”

Source: http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20180314-stephen-hawkings-advice-for-a-fulfilling-career

10 Shocking Workplace Stats You Need To Know

It’s not a mystery that employee engagement continues to sink. The Gallup organization reminds us every couple of years that nearly 70 percent of employees are actively disengaged. It’s also not a mystery that generational differences, and the shift of leadership, continues to elicit headlines—revealing to all of us in the corporate world that the only thing we can truly count on is change.

But these aren’t the only numbers that should make us think. Research is consistently giving us insights into the realities of today’s working world. And because our heads are buried in research each and every day, we thought it would be fun and enlightening to give you some of the statistics we thought were most provocative and interesting.

  1. A recent study by CareerBuilder.com shows that a whopping 58 percent of managers said they didn’t receive any management training. Digest that for a second. Most managers in the workforce were promoted because they were good at what they did, and not necessarily good at making the people around them better. This statistic obviously unveils a harsh reality. We have a bunch of leaders who aren’t trained on how to lead.
  2. Leigh Branham, author of The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave revealed that 89 percent of bosses believe employees quit because they want more money. As much as any boss would love this statistic to be true (because it basically pardons any manager from wrong-doing) it’s simply not true. Only 12 percent of employees actually leave an organization for more money.
  3. Loverboy’s Working for the Weekend is still ranked #100 on VH1′s 100 Greatest Songs of the 80′s. Although this is just a fun fact, it may reveal something bigger—that there’s a connection to the lyrics and sentiment of the song that tells us how many employees just want to get away from work.
  4. A Harvard Business Review survey reveals 58 percent or people say they trust strangers more than their own boss. This is truly shocking. We live in a world where cultural trust is at an all time low, but also, in certain areas, at ground-breaking Never before would we ask a stranger to drive our kids around town until Uber and Lyft arrived. However, distrust of leadership should be worrisome to all of us who have jobs.
  5. Global studies reveal that 79 percent of people who quit their jobs cite ‘lack of appreciation’ as their reason for leaving. As two guys steeped in research about the power and impact of employee appreciation, this isn’t a shocker to us, but it is to many of the companies we consult. People don’t leave companies. They leave bosses.
  6. American workers forfeited nearly 50 percent of their paid vacation in 2017. And, nearly 10 percent take no vacation days at all. According to a study by Glassdoor, the fear of falling behind is the number one reason people aren’t using their vacation time.
  7. Career Builder released a study that revealed two out of every five employees suggest they’ve gained weight at their current job. The shocking part isn’t the weight gain as much as the fact over a quarter of these employees had access to employer-sponsored wellness benefits, but 63 percent of those employees didn’t take advantage of them.
  8. People still fall in love at work. A study by Glassdoor suggests that men and women are almost equal when it comes to finding love in the workplace. Women find love a little more frequently than men, however. 52 percent reported finding love at work, compared to only 48 percent.
  9. The Conference Board reports that 53 percent of Americans are currently unhappy at work. Consider that for a second. Half of the workforce is unhappy. That is sad. Not to be snarky, but maybe taking a vacation (the statistics are hauntingly similar) might be a good starting place.
  10. Recognition is the number one thing employees say their manager could give them to inspire them to produce great work. Global studies prove that when it comes to inspiring people to be their best at work, nothing else comes close—not even higher pay, promotion, autonomy or training.

While all of these statistics are fascinating to think about, just pondering their meaning won’t achieve much. As leaders, it’s our responsibility to take action, look for ways to promote change, and, if we have to, build practices, policies, and procedures that inspire change. That is our job. We’re responsible to inspire the best in people.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidsturt/2018/03/08/10-shocking-workplace-stats-you-need-to-know/#704a2648f3af

HR Tech’s Role in Compliance – Disruptor or Enabler?

Is technology a boon or bane for compliance? We look at emerging trends, and how tech can help HR teams navigate these murky regulatory waters

Compliance doesn’t always take center stage for HR, but it’s a critical and ongoing function. While successful recruitment, high retention rates, and low attrition are important KPIs, they have to be offset by a secure and compliant HR ecosystem.

And non-compliance in HR could have a huge impact on the bottom-line – a wrongful termination suit could set a business back by USD 500,000 and for discrimination lawsuits, the numbers go up to millions.

Clearly, HR compliance has to be reinforced – but an emerging wrench in the works is technology. The digitalization of everything has disrupted the world as we know it, and it’s no different for HR. With the majority of HR processes now automated, digitalized, and moved to the cloud, there is a unified environment that’s easy to access – both from inside the organization and out of it.

Hackers are gradually beginning to exploit these vast data reservoirs to tap into sensitive employee information. So, along with digitalization, comes the need to formulate a data privacy compliance plan as well.

What this also means is that HR and IT teams must look at closer collaboration if they are to set up a tech infrastructure that’s cutting-edge, but fully compliant.

Another area of concern is change management. Tech adoption leads to rewritten regulations, followed by digital enhancement to cope with new rules, and so on – a continuous cycle.

This requires HR managers and compliance officers to monitor social media, online publications, and bulletins for updated information. Being aware of compliance infringement cases could also prevent lapses. In short, tech evolution is turning compliance from the traditional checklist-based practice, into an ever-changing practice.

The upside is that while technology does introduce a metaphorical wrench, the same wrench can also be used to tighten the gears. Here are 6 key HR tasks that could become more compliant, using digital solutions

Add transparency to convoluted paper processes

Compliance has always relied on large portions of paperwork, from Tax forms, employee handbooks, disciplinary actions, health forms, to other documentation. All this can now be stored electronically, not only adding space, but enabling quick retrieval when needed – for audit purposes, for instance.

These are also easier to classify and organize, in line with regulatory norms.

Provide reports, on time and without fuss

Having a dedicated solution in place makes it easier to generate reports, without having to manually sift through and assemble all the necessary information.

Compliance software – or even robust, end-to-end HR tools – support report generation for the benefit of regulators, auditors, or legal teams.

Monitor regulatory updates and process changes

With new mandates constantly being stacked, the technology could prove invaluable for keeping track of all these changes. The rules are automatically fed into the systems, processes are reconciled, documents filed, and anomalies flagged for resolution.

This creates a truly transparent pipeline where each participant has full visibility over what’s happening.

Conduct effective training and maintain records

A fundamental tenet of compliance is training – since several non-compliance acts are a result of simply not knowing the protocol, companies are charged with keeping their workforce trained on all compliance aspects.

For HR, this includes sexual harassment, diversity, safety, wellness, and more. The company must also be able to show, in case of an audit, that all employees underwent the training.

A learning management system (or LMS) can help streamline the process – all sessions and assignments are automatically recorded, including performance testimonials and certification. Having a third-party LMS vendor also helps keep the system updates, at minimal costs or efforts.

Recruit without bias

Recruitment bias has been plaguing businesses for a while now and because hiring depends on human decision making, there’s always a chance of personal opinion, seeping in.

Modern tech tools are increasingly adding a compliance layer, using advanced tools to spot biases in job posts. This could help recruiters avoid errors, and in the long run, prevent expensive and protracted litigation risks. And having a diverse, compliant workforce could also help boost productivity by a wide margin.

Maintain accurate timesheets and synchronize with payroll

An electronic leave, attendance and payroll platform can keep HR departments in line with leave acts, paid leaves, overtime pay, logged-in hours, and other regulations. And as global workforces begin to go remote, maintaining accurate records will become increasingly harder.

An automated system allows accurate time and wage tracking, preventing conflicts with employees and auditors.

Source: https://www.hrtechnologist.com/articles/labour-laws/hr-techs-role-in-compliance-disruptor-or-enabler/

6 Good Reasons To Spend More Time Developing Your Employees

Whatever your business, developing your employees matters. I’d wager to bet it’s something you feel in the back of your mind you ought to do more of but you just don’t have time to. (I know when I was in the corporate world I felt that way.)

Besides, employee development is an activity whose payoffs are long term. It’s hard to show quick ROI on… and let’s assume Schnauzer, your crusty old CFO over there in the stately corner office, is death on projects without ginormous ROI.

So if you need some ammunition to give to Schnauzer, here goes: six good reasons to spend more time developing your employees.

There’s solid data behind it. A study in Harvard Business Review found a connection between the early exits of top young managers and frustration with lack of development opportunities. And this is exactly the kind of high-achieving talent companies want to hold onto.

Employees take it seriously. As the study cited above noted (and as my decades in management confirmed), employees are greatly appreciative when managers take a genuine interest in their development. Why wouldn’t they be? It can substantively benefit their careers…and who doesn’t want that?

It breeds loyalty. Employees don’t forget managers who helped them generously along the way. I know I didn’t. And I always felt those whom I went out of my way to develop (though I guiltily admit there weren’t enough of them) were loyal to me.

Loyalty breeds productivity. Yes indeed it does. Hard work, commitment and productivity. Enough said.

It’s good for your organization. Even without those elusive ROI figures in hand, it’s hard to argue that having more versatile and broadly skilled employees – increasing intellectual capital, in short – isn’t a positive thing for your company. I suspect even old Schnauzer would have a hard time disagreeing.

It’s good for your own career. Gaining a reputation as someone who effectively develops his or her people is an excellent reputation to have. Such managers stand out in an organization and are generally widely known and respected. Once you gain a reputation as a top breeder of talent, you’ll likely find yourself with higher productivity and lower turnover.

Even Schnauzer will approve of that.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/victorlipman/2018/03/08/6-good-reasons-to-spend-more-time-developing-your-employees/#5743e1a5351b

Does your company culture need a vitamin or an aspirin?

According to just about every resource available most companies have a “less than ideal” culture. What’s at stake when your culture is at risk?

Well, most importantly – your people. To quote valuation expert, Dave Bookbinder, the author of the best-selling book, The New ROI: Return on Individuals, “The value of a business is a function of how well the financial capital and intellectual capital are managed by the human capital. So, you better get the human capital right.”

Let’s extend what’s at risk to bottom-line profits and shareholder value. We can beat the horse about how engagement hovers near an all-time low for the past decade, but engagement is only one component of what makes up a company’s culture.

According to just about every resource available most companies have a “less than ideal” culture. What’s at stake when your culture is at risk?

Well, most importantly – your people. To quote valuation expert, Dave Bookbinder, the author of the best-selling book, The New ROI: Return on Individuals, “The value of a business is a function of how well the financial capital and intellectual capital are managed by the human capital. So, you better get the human capital right.”

Let’s extend what’s at risk to bottom-line profits and shareholder value. We can beat the horse about how engagement hovers near an all-time low for the past decade, but engagement is only one component of what makes up a company’s culture.

The cost to replace an employee can be as high as 213 per cent of an employee’s base salary

Let’s look at the entire life cycle of an employee, from hire to retire. On the talent acquisition/hire front, making a bad hire can cost companies potential earnings, replacement costs, ineffectiveness, or worse, cause a drain on morale. The cost to replace an employee can be as high as 213 per cent of an employee’s base salary.

From a management perspective, ineffective leadership can result in stagnant growth, bungled initiatives and even corporate collapse. Attrition, team dysfunction, failed acquisitions or strategic initiatives, and lack of productivity are all directly attributable to a lack of leadership, mismanagement of people, and/or not putting the right people in the right roles.

And when it comes to succession-planning and identifying the future leaders of your company, it’s hard to promote the right people when the top performers keep exiting for greener pastures.

That begs the question: when your company is put under the microscope, does your culture need a boost to stay healthy (a vitamin), or is your company’s culture a real pain point in need of some relief (an aspirin)?

Let’s diagnose this further…

What is the number-one concern of chief executives for 2018? According to Deloitte, 87 per cent say it is employee retention.

The economy is better and the job market has improved. It’s a talent-driven market, and 75 per cent of employees get at least one phone call a week from a recruiter looking to entice them away.

And it’s not just about money; 10 per cent of employees will leave for more money. And if someone has stayed just for money, or leaves for money, whether they are a top performer or mediocre, they’re a mercenary. They’ll leave when the next highest bidder comes along. Not great for culture…

New research from ADP shows that over 60 per cent of the United States workforce turns over each year, and 65 per cent of this is voluntary. Some 85 per cent of employees leave their job because of their relationship with their manager. So how do you improve that relationship?

You need to find out what drives your employees.

When companies identify the key drivers of their employees, align them to the company’s goals, and determine culture-fit and job-fit, not only does engagement increase and morale improve, productivity and employee retention increase. As a result, bottom-line profits go up.

We tend to hire employees for what they know and fire (or lose) them for who they are. When we look at the entire life cycle of an employee, from hire to retire, we need to account for both. Analytics bring awareness. With awareness you can leverage the diversity of strengths within your workforce.

Objective and scientifically valid workforce analytics can help take the guesswork out of what drives employees. And if you guess wrong, you could actively disengage an otherwise engaged employee. Actively disengaged employees are the epicentre of office politics, the source of gossip and purveyors of negativity. Misery loves company. They are not benign. They are malignant. There goes your culture…

Conversely, what does a superstar employee look like? They’re easy to spot. They’re in the flow. They’re magnetic. They’re the “go-to.” They bring others up. They attract other superstars. They manage change, complexity, and adversity well. Therefore, they stick around when they face challenges.

How do companies measure the results of an improved culture? There are the usual indicators, such as a decrease in turnover, increase in morale and engagement, etc…

When employees are matched to a job and culture that not only fit their skills and experience (what they know) and their natural drives (who they are), they are in alignment and able to give discretionary effort.

Therefore, the telltale sign of winning culture is discretionary effort. If you want to increase the “return on individuals” in any culture, then analytics (that reveal what drives employees and utilise that data to match job-fit and culture-fit) are the aspirin.

Source: https://www.raconteur.net/business/company-culture-need-vitamin-aspirin

10 Shocking Workplace Stats You Need To Know

It’s not a mystery that employee engagement continues to sink. The Gallup organization reminds us every couple of years that nearly 70 percent of employees are actively disengaged. It’s also not a mystery that generational differences, and the shift of leadership, continues to elicit headlines—revealing to all of us in the corporate world that the only thing we can truly count on is change.

But these aren’t the only numbers that should make us think. Research is consistently giving us insights into the realities of today’s working world. And because our heads are buried in research each and every day, we thought it would be fun and enlightening to give you some of the statistics we thought were most provocative and interesting.

  1. A recent study by CareerBuilder.com shows that a whopping 58 percent of managers said they didn’t receive any management training. Digest that for a second. Most managers in the workforce were promoted because they were good at what they did, and not necessarily good at making the people around them better. This statistic obviously unveils a harsh reality. We have a bunch of leaders who aren’t trained on how to lead.
  2. Leigh Branham, author of The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave revealed that 89 percent of bosses believe employees quit because they want more money. As much as any boss would love this statistic to be true (because it basically pardons any manager from wrong-doing) it’s simply not true. Only 12 percent of employees actually leave an organization for more money.
  3. Loverboy’s Working for the Weekend is still ranked #100 on VH1′s 100 Greatest Songs of the 80′s. Although this is just a fun fact, it may reveal something bigger—that there’s a connection to the lyrics and sentiment of the song that tells us how many employees just want to get away from work.
  4. A Harvard Business Review survey reveals 58 percent or people say they trust strangers more than their own boss. This is truly shocking. We live in a world where cultural trust is at an all time low, but also, in certain areas, at ground-breaking Never before would we ask a stranger to drive our kids around town until Uber and Lyft arrived. However, distrust of leadership should be worrisome to all of us who have jobs.
  5. Global studies reveal that 79 percent of people who quit their jobs cite ‘lack of appreciation’ as their reason for leaving. As two guys steeped in research about the power and impact of employee appreciation, this isn’t a shocker to us, but it is to many of the companies we consult. People don’t leave companies. They leave bosses.
  6. American workers forfeited nearly 50 percent of their paid vacation in 2017. And, nearly 10 percent take no vacation days at all. According to a study by Glassdoor, the fear of falling behind is the number one reason people aren’t using their vacation time.
  7. Career Builder released a study that revealed two out of every five employees suggest they’ve gained weight at their current job. The shocking part isn’t the weight gain as much as the fact over a quarter of these employees had access to employer-sponsored wellness benefits, but 63 percent of those employees didn’t take advantage of them.
  8. People still fall in love at work. A study by Glassdoor suggests that men and women are almost equal when it comes to finding love in the workplace. Women find love a little more frequently than men, however. 52 percent reported finding love at work, compared to only 48 percent.
  9. The Conference Board reports that 53 percent of Americans are currently unhappy at work. Consider that for a second. Half of the workforce is unhappy. That is sad. Not to be snarky, but maybe taking a vacation (the statistics are hauntingly similar) might be a good starting place.
  10. Recognition is the number one thing employees say their manager could give them to inspire them to produce great work. Global studies prove that when it comes to inspiring people to be their best at work, nothing else comes close—not even higher pay, promotion, autonomy or training.

While all of these statistics are fascinating to think about, just pondering their meaning won’t achieve much. As leaders, it’s our responsibility to take action, look for ways to promote change, and, if we have to, build practices, policies, and procedures that inspire change. That is our job. We’re responsible to inspire the best in people.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidsturt/2018/03/08/10-shocking-workplace-stats-you-need-to-know/#695247acf3af

5 employer branding myths that are holding you back

As you may already know, your competitive advantage relies on the job satisfaction and productivity of the employees who work for your organization. Companies that develop reputations for being great places to work have strong employer branding. Unfortunately, many organizations believe that successful branding is beyond their reach; they believe that the branding they see in other companies is impossible to replicate.

Fortunately, employer branding responsibilities do not fall only to HR, marketing or communications. It’s is a whole-business function, which any company has the opportunity to develop. Here are five myths that prevent many companies from creating a healthy employer branding strategy.

Myth #1: It’s too expensive.
In reality, you can’t afford not to. If you have an existing foundation, it’s you’re in a good position to shape and implement a branding strategy for your company. You already have an army of brand ambassadors — your employees. When your company is seeking candidates, ask your current employees to share job openings through social media. This is an easy and free way to strengthen or create an employer brand.

Myth #2: It’s just for big companies.
Employer branding is even more necessary when you have a consumer brand that few have heard of — yet. You need to invest in your online presence and analyze how candidates find out about your company.

When they do a search for your company, what information does Google show on the first two pages? Would a job seeker see relevant information about job openings? Many candidates use information they find in a Google search as a factor in deciding whether to interview or accept a job offer from a company. And you don’t have to be a big company for people to look you up.

Myth #3: You can’t measure it.
Yes, you can. Whether you’ve been executing employer-branding campaigns for years or are just starting out, studying the analytics of your company website is crucial.

At the very least, you should analyze how many visits you have on your career landing page each month, the areas on your website where visitors spend the most time, and how many applicants apply for each job through your website. You can also analyze how many people interact with your social media platforms by using Google Analytics, Twitter Analytics, LinkedIn Analytics, and other analytics tools, which are all free. By setting goals and constantly measuring them, you can see how your branding strategy is working.

Myth #4: My company doesn’t need it.
Do potential candidates line up at the door of your HR department without any effort on your part to recruit them? If the answer is yes, then you deserve a statue. But if the answer is no, you need to analyze each step in a candidate’s journey to find out how he or she interacts with your employer brand.

Myth #5: It is too difficult.
The good news is that your employer brand already exists. You don’t have to create a new one, unless you’re creating a new company. You can outline an effective employer branding strategy by calling on your current employees: Ask them what they like about their work, what they value most about the company and what directives they would like to develop. This allows you to access their insights easily and quickly and use them to project their positive image of your company on social media platforms, which are usually the entry point into employer branding.

Final thoughts
Every company has an employer brand, whether it has been consciously or unconsciously defined. By tapping into the wisdom of current employees, company management and candidates who have interacted with the company, you can build a healthy employer brand — an absolute “must” as your brand is the reputation your company has with its employees and job candidates.

Source: https://www.hrdive.com/news/5-employer-branding-myths-that-are-holding-you-back/518405/

Why businesses must tackle digital disruption head-on through upskilling and re-skilling

Upskilling the current workforce is a more time and cost-effective method to become an agile and proactive business than looking for new talent through external channels.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution has resulted in a digital disruption that has massively impacted various industries. Skill requirements for jobs are rapidly changing, while entire industries evolve simultaneously.

According to a NASSCOM report, nearly 40 percent of the estimated four million workforce in India will need re-skilling over the next five years to keep up with technology trends like automation that are pervading nearly every major industry. Newer technologies like cloud computing, Big Data, analytics, and Machine Learning provide immense opportunities for career growth to aspiring professionals in the IT and financial sectors. As a result, businesses in these sectors, realising the need to upgrade themselves, are focusing on adopting new-age technologies and digitisation.

However, a more pressing need for these businesses is to have the right talent that is skilled in applying these technologies or upskilling their existing talent base. For organisations to effectively achieve their business objectives, they will need to take a fundamentally different approach to managing their talent pool.

Hiring trends across organisations are dominated today by the demand for skilled individuals who have the knowledge of modern digital tools. However, instead of focusing on helping their existing talent grow, most organisations opt for external recruitment channels to locate skilled talent in the job market and hire them.

Also, a lot of organisations are usually obsessed with chasing new talent, and in the process neglecting the contribution and not valuing their existing employees. Recruiters and HR managers must focus on identifying potential employees who can be trained or skilled appropriately in order to take on higher roles in the organisation and fill the skills gaps in the organisation’s workforce.

How to upskill your workforce

The first and foremost step towards undertaking employee upskilling in your organisation is to conduct a survey of the top skills that are in demand and identify the ones your organisation needs most to keep up with emerging trends in the industry. Hence, to become a more agile and proactive business, and gain a competitive edge over the competition, upskilling the current workforce is a far more time and cost-effective method than looking for new talent through external channels. In addition, organisations must make sure that they also do the following:

Facilitate easy access to training and development opportunities and make them affordable for your workforce. You would also want to focus your efforts more on training employees with high productivity and morale. However, you must also make sure that all employees have equal access to all learning and skilling opportunities.

Make sure that the organisation’s training programmes and learning management systems are conducive to different learning styles. While some employees may be better able to learn within a traditional classroom environment, others may prefer online self-paced learning independent of teachers and trainers. Micro-learning modules covering vast topics through multiple short videos can also help employees who prefer to learn on-the-go through mobile devices.

Enable and encourage employees to choose their career paths by making them responsible for their personal development, thereby prompting them to make prudent decisions about furthering their prospects for growth. Employees who are conscious of their freedom to take decisions regarding their career progression are more likely to take ownership over their professional and personal growth.

Incentivise learning and upskilling for employees by rewarding them for completing a training programme. This will drive the importance of reskilling and upskilling in their minds, thereby developing a culture of learning in the organisation.

Upskilling and reskilling employees have proven to enhance productivity while improving employee retention rate for the organisation.

Thus, companies should consider investing in learning management systems through collaboration with skilling firms and online learning platforms. By aligning their talent retention and acquisition strategies with business strategies, organisations can ensure that they are well prepared to take the global digital disruption head-on and emerge as a major success story.

Source: https://yourstory.com/2018/03/businesses-digital-disruption-upskilling-re-skilling/

Seven Leadership Secrets You Should Already Know

Not all of us naturally know how to lead. Some leaders have received training, had a mentor or are just plain naturally intuitive leaders. However, many wing it and hope for the best. If you want to be a great leader, here’s what you should know.

Accept a lateral transfer.

My clients sometimes complain of boredom. Here is a direct quote: “I can do this in my sleep, and if I was near retirement, that would be a good thing, but I’m not.” The conversation naturally then moves into a desire for a promotion.

When a lateral transfer is proposed, many leaders seem to balk at this notion. It is as though they’re insulted. Here’s the thing: A lateral transfer promotes your versatility. By accepting a lateral transfer, you showcase that your skills are transferable, you can learn new things and you can build relationships with a whole new set of stakeholders.

Do not exercise command and control.

The good news is that you have been assigned a cool initiative. Leaders, rather than viewing this as a collective exercise, sometimes decide they are in charge and go for the glory.

Remember, diversity of thought brings richer solutions. You will never be rewarded for being the sole architect, even if the project successfully gets off the ground. Your brand should be about bringing different views to the table and never about what you solely think is the best.

Demonstrate emotional resilience.

Things go wrong. Of course, this creates frustration and anxiety. Your job is not to be reactive. Rather, be that leader who guides your team through the storm. You may not have the answers right away. With careful consideration and dialogue, you are sure to find the solution. Be known as the leader who can navigate through tough times.

Read the room.

Passion leads to high energy and enthusiasm. On a good day, this is inspiring and infectious. On a not so good day, you may miss key signs your audience is not on board.

Watch your audience’s body language. Poor eye contact, reverting to mobile devices and laptops, fidgeting, confused and unhappy facial expressions are cues that mean something is not aligned. Now, stop and take a pulse. Then, recalibrate and allow for a healthy discussion amongst your team members.

Stop being so granular.

Trust your own capabilities. It is assumed that you know your stuff. Your audience wants a high-level overview and an understanding that you are aligned strategically. The more senior you are, the more you must let go of defending your position with tactics. Show that you grasp how your mandate fits into the overall vision.

Ramp up your EQ.

How often do we hear, “They have great technical skills, but on the leadership front, not so much”? Before you charge ahead with your how to and technical recommendations, think about the need to build rapport.

Yes, you might be a subject matter expert. Everyone, though, has a need to win and a particular lens regarding how to achieve that win. You must work to understand their vantage points. If you don’t, you will be seen as running your own race. No matter how hard you run, if you don’t seek to build relationships based on colleagues’ vantage points, it is unlikely you will get traction. Your brilliant ideas may never see the light of day.

Adopt a mentoring role.

This doesn’t necessarily mean you officially take on mentees. What it does mean is that you are invested in helping others succeed. You should be known as a leader who takes the time to guide and offer advice to those who aspire for more. In essence, as a leader, you want to be viewed as a confidante where others see you as a safe haven and sage advisor.

Being a great leader requires many roles and many challenges. With each experience, you pivot closer to being the ideal leader. Remember, people do not leave jobs — they leave bosses. Be that leader everyone wants to work with.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2018/03/05/seven-leadership-secrets-you-should-already-know/#5d2cfd0c6529