It’s Time We Finally Do Away With Performance Improvement Plans

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Today’s workplace is ideally positioned for leaders who are self-aware, relentlessly driven to maximize human potential and create platforms for authentic expressions while exceeding business goals and objectives. These authentic leaders are not only humane, empathic, courageous and vulnerable but honest.

With that stated, one of the popular performance management tools, the performance improvement plan (PIP), is still the defacto standard for improving performance.

The objectives of a PIP are:

• Clarify: Clearly communicate the gaps in an employee’s performance or behavior.

• Capture: Articulate why the employee’s performance isn’t up to par.

• Define: Clearly state what is acceptable behavior and performance.

• Deter: Capture the adverse consequences if the desired performance goals and objectives are not met.

However, despite the best intentions of a PIP, it often fails as a means of enabling or helping employees, but rather, a paper trail to justify punitive measures.

In one article, Michelle Costello asserted accurately that the three scariest words during a performance review season are “performance improvement plan.” Forbes contributor Liz Ryan made a similar statement when she advocated for something better to replace the PIP, which, in her words, is part of the “crusty, outdated management system” that sadly rules in many organizations.

Today’s workplace is ideally positioned for leaders who are self-aware, relentlessly driven to maximize human potential and create platforms for authentic expressions while exceeding business goals and objectives. These authentic leaders are not only humane, empathic, courageous and vulnerable but honest.

With that stated, one of the popular performance management tools, the performance improvement plan (PIP), is still the defacto standard for improving performance.

The objectives of a PIP are:

• Clarify: Clearly communicate the gaps in an employee’s performance or behavior.

• Capture: Articulate why the employee’s performance isn’t up to par.

• Define: Clearly state what is acceptable behavior and performance.

• Deter: Capture the adverse consequences if the desired performance goals and objectives are not met.

However, despite the best intentions of a PIP, it often fails as a means of enabling or helping employees, but rather, a paper trail to justify punitive measures.

In one article, Michelle Costello asserted accurately that the three scariest words during a performance review season are “performance improvement plan.” Forbes contributor Liz Ryan made a similar statement when she advocated for something better to replace the PIP, which, in her words, is part of the “crusty, outdated management system” that sadly rules in many organizations.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2019/07/09/its-time-we-finally-do-away-with-performance-improvement-plans/#24d14be150b2

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